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So this turned out to be simpler than I expected. I just needed to initialize a Padding object first then add it to my packet. pkts = rdpcap(infile) for pkt in pkts: print len(pkt) if len(pkt) < 60: pad_len = 60 - len(pkt) pad = Padding() pad.load = '\x00' * pad_len pkt = pkt/pad if len(pkt) == 60: ...


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The following will capture all packets with destination port number equal to 5555 on all available interfaces. sniff(filter = 'dst port 5555') You can of course specify the interface that you wish to sniff on by specifying the iface parameter.


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Yes. You probably want one of the multiple thread management APIs, such as twisted.internet.threads.deferToThread(): http://twistedmatrix.com/documents/current/api/twisted.internet.threads.html#deferToThread You might use it like: def runScapy(): d = reactor.deferToThread(scapy.sniff) d.addCallback(doSomethingWithSniffResult) ...


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You need to import logging and adjust the settings for the logging message first. What's happening is you import scapy into your namespace, trigger the error - and then change the logging settings. import logging logging.getLogger("scapy.runtime").setLevel(logging.ERROR) from scapy.all import *


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To anyone interested, I reckon I managed to track down the "problem". It is a small non-compliance with the specification that should be fixed. If you check the code for processing ack numbers of segments received (available here), there is a check on the ack numbers' acceptability, as established in rfc 793 and rfc 5961. Based on the rfc 5961, which ...


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>>> ls(DNS) id : ShortField = (0) qr : BitField = (0) opcode : BitEnumField = (0) aa : BitField = (0) tc : BitField = (0) rd : BitField = (0) ra : BitField = (0) z : BitField = (0) rcode : ...


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packet.flags = 0x8 will set the flags option in the IP header, and not the TCP header.You need to do packet.getlayer(TCP).flags = 32 # or 0x20 to set the URG flag of the TCP header. As for testing this, I am assuming packet.show() is not enough? What do you need this "urgent" packet to do?


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For simplicity let's suppose both the outgoing and the incoming packets are captured in "tmp.pcap", and that they are the only two packets captured in that file. Then: pkts = rdpcap("tmp.pcap") roundTripTime = pkts[1].time - pkts[0].time


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Short answer: no. Scapy's sniff function doesn't distinguish between incoming and outgoing packets. If you want to filter based on source mac, you can do this: MYMAC = "12:34:56:78:90:99" def isNotOutgoing(pkt): return pkt[Ether].src != MYMAC sniff(iface="eth0", lfilter=isNotOutgoing)


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I have the same problem, udp socket does not receive scapy packet. I suppose there might be something related to this post: Raw Socket Help: Why UDP packets created by raw sockets are not being recieved by kernel UDP? And what works for me is the socket.IP_HDRINCL option. Here is the working code for both and sender. sender: import socket from scapy.all ...


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Scapy doesn't always perform best: http://askldjd.wordpress.com/2014/01/15/a-reasonably-fast-python-ip-sniffer/ However you can definitely sniff incoming and outgoing. I am not aware of a way to take in only incoming or outgoing specifically but I believe you can filter your results. Or if you are willing to take on a larger task you can edit Scapy and ...


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It seems that simply rearranging the class so that the run method came just under the __init__() method fixed the issue. I also stopped using the thread class and used the multiprocess class, which builds on the Thread class but allows greater concurrency. The final class looks like this: from scapy.all import * import sys import datetime import Queue from ...


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From the docs: $ cd /tmp $ wget scapy.net $ unzip scapy-latest.zip $ cd scapy-2.* $ sudo python setup.py install Alternatively, you can execute the zip file: $ chmod +x scapy-latest.zip $ sudo ./scapy-latest.zip or: $ sudo sh scapy-latest.zip or: $ mv scapy-latest.zip /usr/local/bin/scapy $ sudo scapy


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I don't know if I understand you correctly. Is there any difference between your two SYN packets? If so, just create two SYN as you want and then send them together. If not, send same packets twice using scapy.send(pkt, 2).I don't remember the specific parameters, but I'm sure scapy.send can send as many packets and fast as you like.


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I'm not sure if this meets your needs, but sniff takes a prn keyword argument that is designed for printing the packets to the screen as they come in, but can also be used for processing them in real time. http://www.secdev.org/projects/scapy/doc/usage.html#simplistic-arp-monitor For example: def process(pkt): # do stuff sniff(iface="lo", ...


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If you want to use Scapy (which seems a reasonable choice for what you want to do), you need to use the Packet.time attribute. Here is a simple example: >>> def measure_delay(packet): ... ans, _ = sr(packet, verbose=False) ... if ans: ... return reduce(lambda x, y: y.time - x.time, ans[0]) ... >>> ...


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well, this might not be the full answer, since i also found it hard to find such info, but... for some options, you can check in dhcp.py how they are defined in DHCPOptions dictionary - for example, you see that renewal_time by its definition is of int type and as default set to 21600 - IntField("renewal_time", 21600). for other info, i suggest to dig ...



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