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You are using axis.title = element_text(colour = "#7F3D17") to get the right color for the title. But you should be using plot.title = element_text(colour = "#7F3D17"). With axis.title you define the setting for both axis, whereas with axis.title.x or axis.title.y you define the setting for the x-axis title or y-axis title specifically. Because you are ...


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In addition to the solutions given in the Q&A linked by @hrbrmstr, a litteral representation of it can be achieved using convex hulls: library(scales) #Only for the transparency effect data(iris) plot(iris$Sepal.Length, iris$Sepal.Width, type="n") a <- split(iris, iris$Species) #Separate the dataset by ID (here species) for(i in seq_along(a)){ h ...


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You could use the ellipse function from the ellipse package to compute points on an ellipse, for each group of data you would give the ellipse function the means, standard deviations, and correlation, then pass the results to the lines function to add to the scatterplot. This will work well if the groups are reasonably normal, but the ellipse will not fit ...


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In the description of ?discrete_scale, you will find the following for the breaks argument: "This parameter does not affect in any way how the data is scaled - it only affects the appearance of the legend." If you read the next line, it says that limits is "A character vector specifying the data range for the scale. and the default order of their display in ...


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If I understand you correctly, you want the loess curves to be based on the binary data (??). If so, then this seems be what you are asking for. Ex <- read.csv("StackOverflowEx.csv") library(ggplot2) library(reshape2) # for melt(...) vars <- select.list(names(Ex),multiple=TRUE,graphics=TRUE) Cases<-subset(Ex,select=vars) gg <- ...


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The color function takes an array of colours. For the scatter plot this equates to one colour per data group. if you change it to nv.addGraph(function() { chart = nv.models.scatterChart() .showDistX(true) .showDistY(true) .color( [d3.rgb("green"), d3.rgb("orange")] ); }; it seems to work as you need. EDIT - setting colour using RGB string this can ...


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If you read help("legend") you find out that bg specifies the background of the legend. You need to use pt.bg: legend("topright", legend=c('Point3','Point2','Point1'), pch=c(21,21,21), pt.bg=c('white','black','dark grey'), col=c('black','black','black'), bty='n')


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You can try to use the adjustcolor function For example: getColWithAlpha <- function(colLevel, alphaLevel) { maxAlpha <- max(alphaLevel) cols <- rainbow(length(levels(colLevel))) res <- cols[colLevel] sapply(seq(along.with=res), function(i) adjustcolor(res[i], alphaLevel[i]/maxAlpha) ) } plot(iris$Sepal.Length, iris$Petal.Length, ...


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Adjusting alpha is pretty easy with adjustcolor function: COL <- adjustcolor(c("red", "blue", "darkgreen")[iris$Species], alpha.f = 0.5) plot(iris$Sepal.Length, iris$Petal.Length, col = COL, pch = 19, cex = 1.5) #attempt in base graphics Mapping alpha to variable requires a bit more hacking: # Allocate Petal.Length to 7 length categories seq.pl ...


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It looks like this will be in the next version of the seaborn package (listed as issue #63 on github). In the meantime, here's the solution I came up with. def factor_scatter_matrix(df, factor, palette=None): '''Create a scatter matrix of the variables in df, with differently colored points depending on the value of df[factor]. inputs: ...


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In theory you can solve this optimally using maximum weighted bipartite matching. But this takes time cubic in the number of points, which will be too slow for such large n. There are probably much faster heuristics that start from the same formulation as the exact solution, so it might nevertheless be useful to explain how you would set it up: Let A be a ...


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For the moment, I've implemented a version of GridFit in Python. If anyone else wants to use it, feel free - I'm happy for this to be under CC-Zero. There are probably ways to improve the algorithm, for example by using the point distribution (rather than the aspect ratio of the box) to choose when to bisect vertically and when horizontally. import numpy ...


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You could use Apache Commons math. For linear, polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, and power trend lines OLSMultipleLinearRegression is all you need. In this S.O. previous question, you can found the code for the trend lines. Then you can simply add new series to yout chart with values derived from the trendline.



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