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34

This can be a somewhat confusing way of defining the size but you are basically specifying the area of the marker. This means, to double the width (or height) of the marker you need to increase s by a factor of 4. [because A = W*H => (2W)*(2H)=4A] There is a reason, however, that the size of markers is defined in this way. Because of the scaling of area as ...


31

There's no need for manually setting the colors. Just specify a grayscale colormap... import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot as plt # Generate data... x = np.random.random(10) y = np.random.random(10) # Plot... plt.scatter(x, y, c=y, s=500) plt.gray() plt.show() Or, if you'd prefer a wider range of colormaps, you can also specify the cmap kwarg ...


22

From the documentation for scatter: Optional kwargs control the Collection properties; in particular: edgecolors: The string ‘none’ to plot faces with no outlines facecolors: The string ‘none’ to plot unfilled outlines Try the following: import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import numpy as np x = np.random.randn(60) y = ...


16

You can use plot, but then all points have the same color. However, you can divide the set in different subsets and plot them each with their own color: N = 100000; x = rand(N,1); y = rand(N,1); C = sin(2*x)+y; cdivs = 10; [~, edges] = hist(C,cdivs-1); edges = [-Inf edges Inf]; % to include all points [Nk, bink] = histc(C,edges); figure; hold on; cmap = ...


15

Would these work? plt.scatter(np.random.randn(100), np.random.randn(100), facecolors='none') or using plot() plt.plot(np.random.randn(100), np.random.randn(100), 'o', mfc='none')


12

If you want markers that resize with the figure size, you can use patches: from matplotlib import pyplot as plt from matplotlib.patches import Rectangle x = [0.5, 0.1, 0.3] y = [0.2 ,0.7, 0.8] z = [10, 15, 12] dx = [0.05, 0.2, 0.1] cmap = plt.cm.hot fig = plt.figure() ax = fig.add_subplot(111, aspect='equal') for x, y, c, h in zip(x, y, z, dx): ...


11

This works for me, using matplotlib 1.1: import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot as plt x = np.arange(10) y = np.sin(x) plt.scatter(x, y, marker='+', s=150, linewidths=4, c=y, cmap=plt.cm.coolwarm) plt.show() Result: Alternatively, for n points, make an array of RGB color values with shape (n, 3), and assign it to the edgecolors keyword argument ...


10

It sounds like you want something like this. You need to actually call legend for the legend to appear. The label kwarg just sets the _label attribute on the artist object in question. It's there for convenience, so that the label in the legend can be clearly associated with the plotting command. It doesn't directly have anything to do with adding a legend ...


10

Alright, I found one way to do it, that looks relatively clean: (using the ColorBar object from the question) color_bar.set_alpha(1) color_bar.draw_all() # pylab.draw() or pyplot.draw() might be necessary It would be great to get a confirmation that this is the most robust way to proceed, though! :)


10

Translate from user data coordinate system to display coordinate system. and use edgecolors='none' to plot faces with no outlines. import numpy as np fig = figure() ax = fig.add_subplot(111) dx_in_points = np.diff(ax.transData.transform(zip([0]*len(dx), dx))) scatter(x,y,c=z,s=dx_in_points**2,marker='s', edgecolors='none')


9

I bet engineSize, fuelMile are stings, try printing them, if that is the case, you have to convert them to float before passing them as arguments to scatter floatval = float(strval)


8

To combine various types of plots in the same graph you should use the function plt.hold(True). The following code plots a 3D scatter plot with a 3D surface plot: from mpl_toolkits.mplot3d import * import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import numpy as np from random import random, seed from matplotlib import cm fig = plt.figure() ax = fig.gca(projection='3d') ...


7

What you've got is pretty much "best practice"; it's just a bit confusing until you get used to it. Two things, though: First, be careful with this: sizeof(MPI_CHAR) is, I assume, 4 bytes, not 1. MPI_CHAR is an (integer) constant that describes (to the MPI library) a character. You probably want sizeof(char), or SIZE/2*sizeof(char), or anything else ...


7

You can use the color argument of scatter If your data are already sorted in time than simply use: % let n be the number of points you have cmp = jet(n); % create the color maps changed as in jet color map scatter(x, y, 10, cmp, 'filled'); Otherwise you need to sort your data first: [time, idx] = sort(time); x = x(idx); y = y(idx); cmp = jet(n); % ...


7

Sure, just pass the pch parameter as a character. dat <- data.frame(x=rnorm(100), y1=rnorm(100)-1, y2=rnorm(100), y3=rnorm(100)+1) plot(y1 ~ x, data=dat, pch="0", ylim=c(-4, 4)) points(y2 ~ x, data=dat, pch="3") points(y3 ~ x, data=dat, pch="6") ETA: one nice thing is that the pch parameter, like many base graphics parameters, is vectorised. So you can ...


6

Here's another way: this adds a circle to the current axes, plot or image or whatever : from matplotlib.patches import Circle # $matplotlib/patches.py def circle( xy, radius, color="lightsteelblue", facecolor="none", alpha=1, ax=None ): """ add a circle to ax= or current axes """ # from .../pylab_examples/ellipse_demo.py e = Circle( ...


6

Take a look at RStudio and this example: library(manipulate) data = matrix(rnorm(20), ncol = 2) example <- function(data, a, b){ plot(data[,1],data[,2]) abline(a = a, b = b) } manipulate( example(data, a, b), a = slider(-5,5), b = slider(-5,5) ) This will put a new line on the plot, and allow you to tweak its slope and intercept. This was ...


6

Use locator(), a function that allows you to get the coordinates of the mouse pointer when clicking on a plot. Then use plot(cars) xy <- locator(n=2) lines(xy, col="red", lwd=5) lm(y~x, xy) abline(coef(lm(y~x, xy))) coef(lm(y~x, xy)) (Intercept) x 33.142094 1.529687 Of course the correct way of fitting lines through data is to use a ...


6

EDIT: Complete revision to allow for clarified request Here is my target plot: And here is the code that produces it: library("ggplot2") # CREATE DATA FRAME # This is the sort of data that I understand you to have start <- rnorm(200) value <- rnorm(200) df <- data.frame( cbind(start, value) ) df[ df$start > -0.6 & df$start <= 0, ...


5

In matplotlib grey colors can be given as a string of a numerical value between 0-1. For example c = '0.1' Then you can convert your third variable in a value inside this range and to use it to color your points. In the following example I used the y position of the point as the value that determines the color: from matplotlib import pyplot as plt x = ...


5

x <- runif(50, -10, 10) y <- runif(50, -10, 10) plot(x, y, yaxt="n") # don't plot y-axis, see ?par, section xaxt axis(2, pos=0) # Draw y-axis at 0 line But personally I think that you should use grid() or Andrie solution.


5

Here is a quick solution def getColumn(filename, column): results = csv.reader(open(filename), delimiter="\t") return [result[column] for result in results] and then you can use it like this time = getColumn("filename",0) volt = getColumn("filaname",1) plt.figure("Time/Volt") plt.xlabel("Time(ms)") plt.ylabel("Volt(mV)") plt.plot(time,volt)


5

I would do one of two things: Do the loess() fitting outside of ggplot(), predict for the two regions separately and add each set of predictions to the plot with its own geom_line() layer. Similar to the above, but this time within ggplot() realm of operations. Add two layers to the plot, not one, both using geom_smooth(), but importantly change the data ...


5

Mike Robinson, your example helped. For those who are wondering, here is what I did: I removed: svg.selectAll(".dot") .data(data) .enter().append("circle") .attr("class", "dot") .attr("cx", function(d) { return x(d.x); }) .attr("cy", function(d) { return y(d.y); }) .attr("r", 12); and added: var node = svg.selectAll("g") ...


5

You can fix your script in 2 ways, both involve changing the update function: Using a scatter call in the update function, is clearer I think Transposing the data array before calling set_offsets in update Using a scatter call is the clearest fix, and you could increase the agents during your run: def update(self, i): """Update the scatter plot.""" ...


5

Use abline as in: # Estimating the model model <- lm(snowfall~elevation, data=snowfallElevationPlot) # Plot plot(elevation, snowfall) # Adding the regression line to the plot abline(model) This produces


5

You can use text. Using @HongOoi data: dat <- data.frame(x=rnorm(100), y1=rnorm(100)-1, y2=rnorm(100), y3=rnorm(100)+1) plot(y1 ~ x, data=dat, type='n', ylim=c(-4, 4)) text(dat$x,dat$y1,label=0,col='blue') text(dat$x,dat$y2,label=1,col='green') text(dat$x,dat$y3,label=2,,col='red')


4

I answered my own question after waiting SECONDS for an answer here :-) You can indeed have different colors for different data elements. For example: http://chart.apis.google.com/chart?chs=300x200&cht=s&chd=t:1,2,3|6,5,4&chds=1,3,0,10&chxt=x,y&chxl=0:|0|1|2|1:|0|10&chm=d,ff0000,0,0,8,0|a,ff8080,0,1,42,0|c,ffff00,0,2,16,0 It's the ...


4

This is a huge, ugly hack. But no other way would work. Maybe someone else can improve. fig1 = pylab.figure() fig2 = pylab.figure() ax1 = fig1.add_subplot(111) ax2 = fig2.add_subplot(111) ax1.scatter(range(10), range(10), c=range(10), alpha=0.2) im = ax2.scatter(range(10), range(10), c=range(10), alpha=1.0) fig1.colorbar(im, ax=ax1) fig1.show()


4

To elaborate on @MYaseen208's answer: for the legend (given his code) you want something like: legend("topleft", legend=levels(factor(data.c)), text.col=seq_along(levels(factor(data.c))))



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