New answers tagged

0

In order to do what you want, I wouldn't use the DataFrame plotting methods. I'm also a former experimental physicist, and based on experience with ROOT I think that the Python analog you want is best accomplished using matplotlib. In matplotlib.pyplot there is a method, hist2d(), which will give you the kind of heat map you're looking for. As for creating ...


0

In order to find the regression parameters you can use the normal equation: When dealing with n features you will get n+1 regression parameters, so in your case you have 3 thetas. The plane can be represented using the plane equation: p = theta0 + theta1*p1 +theta2*p2 In order to plot the plane, you need to create a mesh grid of points in your ...


0

Easiest way is to use levelplot. Following lines work: x <- read.table("filename.dat",header=TRUE) colnames(x) <- c("col1", "col2", "col3") levelplot(x$col3 ~ x$col1 + x$col2)


1

As far as I can tell from the documentation, the input parameter c (assuming scatter(x,y,a,c,...)) can be one of: A single character specifying a colour e.g. 'g' or 'r'. But just one single scalar colouring all of you points. A single RGB triple colouring all of your points so [1,0,0] for red or [0,1,0] for green. A three column matrix of RGB triples. This ...


0

When I tried the node solution, some of my data disappeared (?), so I just added a new class called "dodo" which worked for me: svg.selectAll(".dot") .data(data) .enter().append("circle") .attr("class", "dot") .attr("r", 3.5) .attr("cx", function(d) { return x(d.time); }) .attr("cy", function(d) { return y(d.place); }) .style("fill", ...


0

What i want to do is according to different var1_prob, plot the percentile of Var2_indx. such at value 20 for var1_prob what is the 0.05 , 0.1 ,or 0.2 value of var2_indx. i hope this is clear to you @Eric


0

If you want to filter pairs of values where either hp or hs are smaller or equal to zero, then you can do something like the following: mask = (hp > 0) & (hs > 0) hp = hp[mask] hs = hs[mask] In this way you select the same values from both arrays, so the final flattened arrays should have the same size.


2

something like this? require(stats) qts <- quantile(cars[,2], probs = c(.1, .2)) # qts <- quantile(cars$dist, probs = c(.1, .2)) # alternative method … require(graphics) plot(cars) abline(h = qts, col = "red")


0

So apparently I've been missing the name of such a plot, which is a contour plot or level plot. A simple function in lattice allows you to do it. I've used the following code, found on this R blog: df<-data.frame(x=runif(1000,670,3300),y=runif(1000,2,30),z=runif(1000,0.5,1.5)) gni.loess = loess(z ~ x*y, data = df, degree = 2, span = 0.25) gni.fit = ...


1

I found the algorithm mentioned in this poster (similar algorithm also discussed in this paper) works pretty well, especially for compacting large arrays. It uses less memory to do it and is slightly faster than my previous method (5-10%). I put in a few tweaks to the poster's algorithm: 1) eliminating the final warp shuffle reduction in phase 1, can simply ...



Top 50 recent answers are included