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The Problem The question refers to the critical trick with a ScheduledExecutorService: Any thrown exception or error reaching the executor causes the executor to halt. No more invocations on the Runnable, no more work done. This work stoppage happens silently, you'll not be informed. This naughty-language blog posting entertainingly narrates the hard way to ...


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Estimating burst time of a process is a very large topic . in general scheduler estimates the length of the next burst based on the lengths of recent cpu bursts. basically what we do is to guess the next CPU burst time by assuming that it will be related to past CPU bursts for that process . A quick google search led me to this article which will give you a ...


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Yes, it's perfectly normal to reschedule a job from itself.


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I think this question is similar to your question "whole one core dedicated to single process" , please check the replies there.


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Whenever (https://github.com/javan/whenever) rufus-scheduler (https://github.com/jmettraux/rufus-scheduler) Clockwork (https://github.com/tomykaira/clockwork) are somehow pure schedulers. Whenever is backed by Crond, so it's solid (but jobs will get executed in distinct processes). Rufus-scheduler and Clockwork are similar, in Ruby process, schedulers ...


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The problem is that a Sitecore scheduled task runs in a separate thread, and since the command is registered as InstancePerLifetimeScope (if following the example in the linked blog post), Autofac will inject a new instance in the scheduled task. Instead, in your scheduled task you should probably get the command from the CommandManager, using something ...


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This problem is known as the set cover problem. Essentially, you are asking for the smallest set of groups that will cover all of the jobs you want to do. Unfortunately, the problem is NP-complete. Therefore there is not likely to be an efficient algorithm to find the solution. It may not matter if you have a small number of jobs or groups (since you can ...


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Round Robin Scheduling program in C #include<stdio.h> #include<conio.h> main(){ int i, j, k, n, so, tq, sob, sum, swt, stat, tata, temp, count; int bt[10], bth[10], wt[10], tat[10]; float awt=0.0, atat=0.0; char new; // i = loop controller // j = loop controller // k = loop controller // n = number of process ...


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Intuition I will give it a try. The naive approach is to enumerate all possible solutions and pick the best one. With this in mind, finding k rooms which can accommodate n meetings is equivalent to finding a k-way partition of n points. An example of a 2-way partition of 5 meetings is [ 0,2,4 ] and [ 1,3 ] in the OP example: |---0------| ...


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To find the minimum number and capacity of meeting rooms needed to conduct all meetings, you first need to schedule those meetings optionally to the rooms (with a score function that minimizes the number of capacity of rooms). That scheduling (similar to course scheduling) is NP-complete or NP-hard. That implies that your problem is too. That, in turn, ...


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As far as I can see you cannot directly limit number of containers. This is only determined by resources. So the best you can do is to limit resources per application. In accordance to Fair scheduler documentation you can assign your application to special queue. In this case you can receive configuration which is pretty close to your task - as you can ...


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I think you will find that the default scheduling policy for a new pthread is PTHREAD_INHERIT_SCHED. To override this you need to pthread_attr_init() an explicit set of attributes, futz about with pthread_attr_setschedpolicy() and pthread_attr_setschedparam(), and then apply those attributes in pthread_create(). You could sched_getscheduler() and ...


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Consider this scenario: (m1) |-3-| (m2) |--2--| (m3) |--1--| (m4) |-1-| (m5) |-2-| Your solution will proceed as such: {3} (First room created) {3, 2} (Two meetings at same time, second room needed) {3, 2, 1} (Three meetings at same time, third room needed) {3, 2, 1} (m1 is over so m4 goes into the 3-room) {3, 2, 1, 2} (Four meetings at ...


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Process niceness (priority) setting HAS an effect on Linux! (in practise, but ONLY if you give it enough work to do!) On my system, as long as all cores are fully loaded, then nice does have an impact. On ubuntu 14.04, processes run with nice -N gets through 0.807 ** N operations compared to processes run without altering the nice value (given you are ...


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It seems like this is an issue that can be solved with routing: http://celery.readthedocs.org/en/latest/userguide/routing.html When using routing, you can have multiple queues that are populated with different types of tasks. If you want task B to not block more task A, you could make them into separate worker queues with different priority such that your ...



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