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(Make sure you understand higher-order functions). In Alonzo Church's untyped lambda calculus a function is the only primitive data type. There are no numbers, booleans, lists or anything else, only functions. Functions can have only 1 argument, but functions can accept and/or return functions—not values of these functions, but functions themselves. ...


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Scheme macros are hygienic. The genv you defined in get-global-environment is not the same as the genv in your _def-initial (which uses whatever genv was there when _def-initial was defined, which in this case would be the top-level one, which as you pointed out does not exist). In order to make your macro work, you must adapt _fill-global-env, ...


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If a function accepts and/or returns a function, it is called a higher-order function (HOF). For inexperienced programmers, coming from C, C++, or Java, higher-order functions sound like magic, but they are very simple. Imagine a simple function that returns the result of 2 + 3: (define (foo) (+ 2 3)) ;; (foo) => 5 That's a boring function, it always ...


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AFAIK using streams when you are doing something like sorting is a waste of cycles since you need to be finished with the sort in order to know the first element. If you have tasks that work like a sort so that you'll need to evaluate a whole set you'll end up using more time than without streams. The reason for that is that the whole stream system has a ...


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Try this: (reverse (string->list c)) Remember: in Scheme all standard list functions return values that must be used or stored somewhere, they don't modify objects in-place.


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A more radical approach is to not make >> a macro at all: (define (>> it . fs) ((apply compose (reverse fs)) it)) (>> 5 add1 even?) ;; => #t Now it's merely a function that combines the functions given to it into one function and calls that combined function with it's first argument it. The advantage here is you can ...


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The difficulty with tail recursion in these languages is that their implementations use the stack to store procedure arguments and local variables as well as return addresses. In machine language, there are no function calls, so function calls are translated into Push the arguments into the call stack push the return address into the stack goto the ...


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C certainly can implement tail recursion. Tail recursion in C looks like this: int foo (int bar) { int baz; ... return foo(baz); } All C compilers can do that. Some (indeed most) of them provide optimization for it so it doesn't use additional stack space, like this (gcc, MSVC and clang/LLVM): How do I check if gcc is performing ...


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The reason is that in the second example you return a fresh closure every time, whereas in the first example there is only one closure, so only one state. If you want the same behaviour in the first case as you have in the second case, change to: (define (new-withdraw) ; this is a procedure now (let ((balance 100)) (lambda (amount) (if (>= ...


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Since list-ref uses time linear to the index, it is rarely okay to use unless for short lists. If the access pattern is sequential however and the number of elements can vary, then lists are fine. It would be interesting to see a benchmark for summing the elements of a 50 element long list of fixnums. The access pattern to a data structure is not always ...


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In your first example: (time (for ([i (in-range 1000000)]) (make-list 50 #t))) ;50 million list nodes (time (for ([i (in-range 1000000)]) (make-vector 50 #t))) ; 1 million vectors Keep in mind that you're asking for 50x allocations with the list. It's actually not so bad that the GC time is ~20x and the real time is ~10x. Also there's the initial #t ...


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Vectors are the same as arrays in most programming languages. As any arrays they have a fixed size they have O(1) access/update. Increasing the size is expensive since you need to copy every element to a new vector of a larger size. If you do a loop across all elements you can do it O(n). Lists are singly linked lists. They have dynamic size, but random ...


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You need the solution formula for this system of equations: (x-x1)^2 + (y-y1)^2 = r^2 (x-x2)^2 + (y-y2)^2 = r^2 where (x,y) are the center of the circle, and (x1,y1) and (x2,y2) are points on the circle. Giving these equations to Wolfram Alpha gives these solutions: x = (-sqrt(-(y1-y2)^2 (x1^2-2 x1 x2+x2^2+y1^2-2 y1 y2+y2^2) (-4 r^2+x1^2-2 x1 ...


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First off. Scheme (R7RS, R6RS, R5RS) doesn't have printf. There is display and SRFI-28 format. Because of this I'll just read printf as print statement which again could mean you're just using display. The correct answer is that your code should be made into small procedures that can be unit tested easily. If you do that you'll never need either a debugger ...


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Often with mutating procedures like vector-set! the expression evaluates to some undefined value. By undefined we mean the implementer has the choice to put whatever they want. Most implementations then choose an object to be the "undefined" object, but some might choose to return the object that was mutated spearing you from having to do it explicitly in ...


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The value of a begin block is the value of the last expression in the block > (define x (begin (print "hello") 3 2 1)) "hello" > x 1 Implementations may differ regarding the value of vector-mutating expressions - some return the modified vector, while some return void or something equivalent. Thus, in your tree procedure, some implementations will ...


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"how should I close a begin statement?" with any expression you want. When evaluated, the value of that expression is returned as the value of the whole begin expression. Scheme is expression-oriented language. Each code snippet in it - each form - is an expression, not statement — it has some value. Variables are not "called", they are ...


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length returns the number of elements in a list. count is not a standard procedure mentioned in any of the official Scheme reports (I searched R5RS, R6RS and R7RS) so it's not a part of Scheme. In many implementations you will get some sort of error saying that count does not exist. This is radically different than the expected result you have in your ...


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It depends on what interpreter you're using. In standard Scheme, only length is defined. In other interpreters (say, Racket) count exists but it's different, it receives a list and a predicate and returns the number of elements in the list that meet the condition. I don't know in which interpreter count is defined as a single-parameter function that returns ...


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One side note: You need to use an environment model to figure it out.Because the answer of questions like that differs in lexical scoping versus dynamic scoping.


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There are two ancient principles when it comes to "objects": objects are just a poor person's closures and closures are just a poor person's objects You can pass the executor's state around in function arguments to avoid mutation. Use a helper function to get the ball rolling. A simplified example for illustration, using a queue of numbers and ...


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"Best" depends on your needs and constraints; here's an example implementation using Racket's build-in procedures that is short but probably slow for large lists: (define (mycount lst) (map (lambda (e) (cons e (count (curry eqv? e) lst))) (remove-duplicates lst))) then > (mycount '(a a x a 11 11 a 11 a)) '((a . 5) (x . 1) (11 . 3)) If you ...


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(define delete (lambda (atom l) (cond ((null? l) '()) ((atom? (car l)) (cond ((eq? atom (car l)) (delete atom (cdr l))) (else (cons (car l) (delete atom (cdr l)))) ) ) (else (cons ...


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You are so close! List structure is iterated from beginning to end and built from end to beginning. If you want to make the list (1 2 3) you first have to make (2 3) then cons the first 1 to the finished constructed list (2 3). Your rcons do that as you see (cons (car lst) (rcons val (cdr lst))) which makes a list with the current value to the rcons of the ...


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I believe this is highly implementation and setting dependent. In many implementations there are different kinds of optimizations and in some there are none. To get the best performance you may need to compile your code or use settings to reduce debug information / stack traces. Getting the best performance in one implementation can worsen the performance in ...


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Your long ans short questions are actually addressing two different problems. EX 1.23 is problem(below), why the (next) procedure isn't twice faster than (+ 1)? You provide two possible reasons to explain the relative lack of speed up (and 30% speed gain is already a good achievement): The apparent use of a function next instead of a simple ...


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Looking through the source, I found kawa\lib\files.scm, which defines directory-files. So, it is just a matter of: (require <kawa.lib.files>) (directory-files path)


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I'd go for something like this: (define (create-obj mlist) (lambda (method parms) (case method ((override) (set! mlist (cons parms mlist))) (else (let ((func (assoc method mlist))) (if func (apply (cdr func) parms) "Error: no such method")))))) (define myobj (create-obj (list (cons "a" ...


2

I can't run this locally, but you should be returning the end of the list on the final recursion (and not the entire list like you're trying to do, which is always null there by the way...): (define (rcons val lst) (if (not (null? lst)) (cons (car lst) (rcons val (cdr lst))) (cons val '()))) ; recursion ends here - only return end of ...


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This should do: (define (create-obj mlist) (lambda (method parms) (let ((func (assoc method mlist))) (if func (apply (cdr func) parms) "Error: no such method"))))


3

Here is one way to do it. First define a version of >> that uses an explicit it (below it is called >>>). The definition of >> simply generates an identifier and hands it to >>>. #lang racket (define-syntax (>>> stx) (syntax-case stx () [(_ it x) #'x] [(_ it x (y ...) rest ...) #'(let ([it x]) (>>> it (y ...


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The Racket definition of cond is in collects/racket/private/cond.rkt. It's written using low-level syntax object operations, not using either syntax-rules nor syntax-case, so unless you know syntax objects very well, it won't be readable to you. As an alternative starting place for your customised cond, one definition of cond is the reference implementation ...


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r5rs describes cond here: http://www.schemers.org/Documents/Standards/R5RS/HTML/r5rs-Z-H-7.html#%_sec_4.2.1 You would normally implement it as a macro.


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You can also do it like this.First find the lenght of a list by cdring it down.Then use list-ref x which gives the x element of the list. For example list-ref yourlistsname 0 gives the first element (basically car of the list.)And (list-ref yourlistsname (- length 1)) gives the last element of the list.


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The result is the list '(4), not the number 4. You have a list with two elements, where 1 is the first element, and the list ((2 . 3) 4) is the second element. In other words, the cdr of the list is (cons ((2 . 3) 4)) '()), or (((2 . 3) 4)). > (cdr '(1 ((2 . 3) 4))) '(((2 . 3) 4)) This is a list with one element - the list ((2 . 3) 4) - which is of ...


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lang racket A list (a b c) is short for (a . (b . (c . ()))). Therefore '(1 ((2 . 3) 4))) is short for '(1 ((2 . 3) . (4 . ())) . ()). To make sure, we test it in the REPL: > ''(1 ((2 . 3) . (4 . ())) . ()) '(1 ((2 . 3)) 4) cdadr is short for (cdr (car (cdr _))). Here car extract the first part of a pair (car '(a . d)) = a and cdr extract the ...


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They are not the same! Their names can actually help remember which does what. map will take as argument one procedure and one or more lists. The procedure will be called once for each position of the lists, using as arguments the list of elements at that position: (map - '(2 3 4)) ; => (-2 -3 -4) map called (- 2), (- 3), (- 4) to build the list. ...


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Abstraction is a purely syntactical transformation ! It's just beta-reduction in reverse: ..... a ..... ==> (λa. ..... a ..... ) a That is, you just make some entity that you use into a function's parameter, and pass that entity as an argument in the function's call. That way, what was specific before is now generalized, turned into a ...


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In tally-by-place-points you call (total-points-for (first aloc) alov) to get the place points. In tally-by you are supposed to be able to do exactly the same if you pass total-points-for as argument helper. Thus you need to replace references to total-points-for with helper and also pass helper when recursing: (define (tally-by helper aloc alov) (cond ...


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The error reported occurs in the check procedure. All those references to the variables called c and x will fail, what are those variables supposed to be? where do they come from? Remember: in Scheme = is used for comparing two numbers, not for assignment. There are other problems. The last line of check is calling checkp, but you forgot to pass the ...


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No, apply calls its first argument as a procedure, with all the rest as its arguments, with the last one - list - opened up, i.e. its contents "sliced in": (apply f a b (list c d e)) == (f a b c d e) E.g.: (apply + 1 2 (list 3 4 5)) ;Value: 15 It is just one call; map is indeed calling its first argument for each member element of its second ...


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This (define a (lambda() (cons a #f))) defines a procedure, a, which when called will return the pair (<the procedure a> . #f) i.e. whose car is the procedure itself, and whose cdr is #f. In other words, the result of evaluating (a) is the result of calling the procedure a with no arguments, which is, by definition of a above, (<the ...


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define from top level defines a global variable a. The anonymous procedure (lambda() (cons a #f), when called, makes a pair out of the evaluation of a and #f. When you evaluate a you get a procedure. In my system you get #<procedure:a>. When you evaluate (a) you get (#<procedure:a> . #f). Now the way procedures display is highly ...


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Probably because you're using a restricted sublanguage that offers only limited functionality. What Scheme implementation are you using, and are you in some kind of restricted module that doesn't import the standard Scheme procedures? modulo is indeed a standard part of Scheme and is included in any standard Scheme system. (It is, however, not a "keyword", ...


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Character classes are surrounded by two square brackets on each side. In your second expression, you only have one square bracket on each of the inner sides of the character classes. You need to do this instead: #px"[[:digit:]]-[[:digit:]]" On the other hand, using full POSIX character classes just to match digits is a little verbose. Since it's so ...


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for-each evaluates the given function on the list elements left-to-right, and discards the return value of the function. It's ideal for doing side-effecting things to each element of the list. map evaluates the given function on the list elements in no specific order (though most implementations will use either right-to-left or left-to-right), and saves the ...


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There is a big difference: map returns the list containing the results of applying the given procedure on the elements of the list (or lists), while for-each returns void. > (for-each (λ (x) (add1 x)) '(1 2 3)) > (map (λ (x) (add1 x)) '(1 2 3)) '(2 3 4) You use map whenever you need the result of the computation and you use for-each when you're ...


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To call the procedure aterm with n as a parameter you need to express it as (aterm n): (define series (lambda (n a-term) (if (= n 0) 0 (+ (a-term n) (series (- n 1) a-term))))) then > (series 10 (lambda (n) (sqr n))) 385 or, shorter > (series 10 sqr) 385


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There's for/list with in-indexed and that does what you describe: (define (f lst f1 f2) (define last (sub1 (length lst))) (for/list (((e i) (in-indexed lst))) (if (< 0 i last) (f1 e) (f2 e)))) then > (f '(1 2 3 4 5) sub1 add1) '(2 1 2 3 6)


3

You can use a map on all the elements except the first and the last one and treat those two separately. In this way you avoid those comparisons which you would do for every element. (define special-map (λ (lst f1 f2) (append (list (f1 (car lst))) (map f2 (drop-right (cdr lst) 1)) (list (f1 (last lst)))))) Example Let's try ...



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