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130

Many learning algorithms either learn a single weight per feature, or they use distances between samples. The former is the case for linear models such as logistic regression, which are easy to explain. Suppose you have a dataset having only a single categorical feature "nationality", with values "UK", "French" and "US". Assume, without loss of generality, ...


90

You can also use joblib.dump and joblib.load which is much more efficient at handling numerical arrays than the default python pickler. Joblib is included in scikit-learn: >>> from sklearn.externals import joblib >>> from sklearn.datasets import load_digits >>> from sklearn.linear_model import SGDClassifier >>> digits = ...


56

Use its value directly: In [79]: df[df.c > 0.5][['b', 'e']].values Out[79]: array([[ 0.98836259, 0.82403141], [ 0.337358 , 0.02054435], [ 0.29271728, 0.37813099], [ 0.70033513, 0.69919695]])


51

What you want is called multi-label classification. Scikits-learn can do that. See here: http://scikit-learn.org/dev/modules/multiclass.html. I'm not sure what's going wrong in your example, my version of sklearn apparently doesn't have WordNGramAnalyzer. Perhaps it's a question of using more training examples or trying a different classifier? Though note ...


50

I think you can almost do exactly what you thought would be ideal, using the statsmodels package which is one of pandas' optional dependencies (it's used for a few things in pandas.stats.) >>> import pandas as pd >>> import statsmodels.formula.api as sm >>> df = pd.DataFrame({"A": [10,20,30,40,50], "B": [20, 30, 10, 40, 50], "C": [...


49

Classifiers are just objects that can be pickled and dumped like any other. To continue your example: import cPickle # save the classifier with open('my_dumped_classifier.pkl', 'wb') as fid: cPickle.dump(gnb, fid) # load it again with open('my_dumped_classifier.pkl', 'rb') as fid: gnb_loaded = cPickle.load(fid)


46

Here's a small kmeans that uses any of the 20-odd distances in scipy.spatial.distance, or a user function. Comments would be welcome (this has had only one user so far, not enough); in particular, what are your N, dim, k, metric ? #!/usr/bin/env python # kmeans.py using any of the 20-odd metrics in scipy.spatial.distance # kmeanssample 2 pass, first sample ...


43

There are indeed several ways to get feature "importances". As often, there is no strict consensus about what this word means. In scikit-learn, we implement the importance as described in [1] (often cited, but unfortunately rarely read...). It is sometimes called "gini importance" or "mean decrease impurity" and is defined as the total decrease in node ...


43

You can use: >>> from sklearn.externals import joblib >>> joblib.dump(clf, 'my_model.pkl', compress=9) And then later, on the prediction server: >>> from sklearn.externals import joblib >>> model_clone = joblib.load('my_model.pkl') This is basically a Python pickle with an optimized handling for large numpy arrays. ...


41

It's possible to do this with pandas.stats.ols: >>> from pandas.stats.api import ols >>> df = pd.DataFrame({"A": [10,20,30,40,50], "B": [20, 30, 10, 40, 50], "C": [32, 234, 23, 23, 42523]}) >>> res = ols(y=df['A'], x=df[['B','C']]) >>> res -------------------------Summary of Regression Analysis------------------------- ...


40

Scikit-learn uses LibSVM internally, and this in turn uses Platt scaling, as detailed in this note by the LibSVM authors, to calibrate the SVM to produce probabilities in addition to class predictions. Platt scaling requires first training the SVM as usual, then optimizing parameter vectors A and B such that P(y|X) = 1 / (1 + exp(A * f(X) + B)) where f(X)...


40

It looks like sklearn requires the data shape of (row number, column number). If your data shape is (row number, ) like (999, ), it does not work. By using numpy.reshape, you should change to (999, 1). Ex. data.reshape((999,1)) In my case, it worked with that.


38

Worked for me after installing scipy.


36

The classifiers themselves do not record feature names, they just see numeric arrays. However, if you extracted your features using a Vectorizer/CountVectorizer/TfidfVectorizer/DictVectorizer, and you are using a linear model (e.g. LinearSVC or Naive Bayes) then you can apply the same trick that the document classification example uses. Example (untested, ...


32

HashingVectorizer will work if you iteratively chunk your data into batches of 10k or 100k documents that fit in memory for instance. You can then pass the batch of transformed documents to a linear classifier that supports the partial_fit method (e.g. SGDClassifier or PassiveAggressiveClassifier) and then iterate on new batches. You can start scoring the ...


31

I think there is a lot of confusion about which weights are used for what. I am not sure I know precisely what bothers you so I am going to cover different topics, bear with me ;). Class weights The weights from the class_weight parameter are used to train the classifier. They are not used in the calculation of any of the metrics you are using: with ...


29

I finally got to solve the problem. Two things had to be done: train_argcands_target is a list and it has to be a numpy array. I'm surprised it worked well before when I just used the estimator directly. For some reason (I don't know why, yet), it doesn't work either if I use the sparse matrix created by the DictVectorizer. I had to, "manually", transform ...


29

I was able to fix this by going to my python folder and deleting the file: python27\Lib\site-packages\sklearn\utils\sparsefuncs.pyd My guess is that the problem was: An older version of scikit-learn implemented sparsefuncs as a windows DLL The current version implements it as a python file If you install a new version on top of an old version it does ...


27

I created my own function to extract the rules from the decision trees created by sklearn: import pandas as pd import numpy as np from sklearn.tree import DecisionTreeClassifier # dummy data: df = pd.DataFrame({'col1':[0,1,2,3],'col2':[3,4,5,6],'dv':[0,1,0,1]}) # create decision tree dt = DecisionTreeClassifier(max_depth=5, min_samples_leaf=1) dt.fit(df....


26

This is not a CSV file; this is just a space separated file. Assuming there are no missing values, you can easily load this into a Numpy array called data with import numpy as np f = open("filename.txt") f.readline() # skip the header data = np.loadtxt(f) If the stock price is what you want to predict (your y value, in scikit-learn terms), then you ...


26

You can pass sample weights argument to Random Forest fit method sample_weight : array-like, shape = [n_samples] or None Sample weights. If None, then samples are equally weighted. Splits that would create child nodes with net zero or negative weight are ignored while searching for a split in each node. In the case of classification, splits ...


25

MLPClassifier is not yet available in scikit-learn v0.17 (as of 1 Dec 2015). If you really want to use it you could clone 0.18dev (however, I don't know how stable this branch currently is).


24

how would you normally tell that the model is over-fitting? One useful rule of thumb is that you may be overfitting when your model's performance on its own training set is much better than on its held-out validation set or in a cross-validation setting. That's not all there is to it, though. The blog entry I linked to describes a procedure for testing ...


24

For some algorithms supporting partial_fit, it would be possible to write an outer loop in a script to do out-of-core, large scale text classification. However there are some missing elements: a dataset reader that iterates over the data on the disk as folders of flat files or a SQL database server, or NoSQL store or a Solr index with stored fields for ...


24

if your data is a pandas DataFrame, then you can simply call get_dummies. Assume that your data frame is df, and you want to have one binary variable per level of variable 'key'. You can simply call: pd.get_dummies(df['key']) and then delete one of the dummy variables, to avoid the multi-colinearity problem. I hope this helps ...


24

Since version 0.15, the tf-idf score of each feature can be retrieved via the attribute idf_ of the TfidfVectorizer object: from sklearn.feature_extraction.text import TfidfVectorizer corpus = ["This is very strange", "This is very nice"] vectorizer = TfidfVectorizer(min_df=1) X = vectorizer.fit_transform(corpus) idf = vectorizer.idf_ print dict(...


23

If you're using scikit-learn you can use sklearn.preprocessing.normalize: import numpy as np from sklearn.preprocessing import normalize x = np.random.rand(1000)*10 norm1 = x / np.linalg.norm(x) norm2 = normalize(x[:,np.newaxis], axis=0).ravel() print np.all(norm1 == norm2) # True


22

The most scalable kernel SVM implementation I know of is LaSVM. It's written in C hence wrap-able in Python if you know Cython, ctypes or cffi. Alternatively you can use it from the command line. You can use the utilities in sklearn.datasets to load convert data from a NumPy or CSR format into svmlight formatted files that LaSVM can use as training / test ...


22

In case you are using the binaries from http://www.lfd.uci.edu/~gohlke/pythonlibs/#scikit-learn. They require numpy-MKL, as indicated on the download page. The official numpy binaries won't work.


22

I have finally found the answer. You need to shuffle the training data between each iteration, as setting shuffle=True when instantiating the model will NOT shuffle the data when using partial_fit (it only applies to fit). Note: it would have been helpful to find this information on the sklearn.linear_model.SGDClassifier page. The amended code reads as ...



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