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4

From source code documentation: Cosine distance is defined as 1.0 minus the cosine similarity. So your result make sense.


4

Because word 'algoritham' never appeared in your documents. Perhaps you should try 'algorithm'.


3

The biggest difference between the models you're building from a "features" point of view is that Naive Bayes treats them as independent, whereas SVM looks at the interactions between them to a certain degree, as long as you're using a non-linear kernel (Gaussian, rbf, poly etc.). So if you have interactions, and, given your problem, you most likely do, an ...


2

Use LabelEncoder which takes an array of strings and transforms it into an array of integers. Example: from sklearn.preprocessing import LabelEncoder import pandas as pd data = pd.DataFrame() data['age'] = [17,33,47] data['gender'] = ['m','f','m'] enc = LabelEncoder() print(data) enc.fit(data['gender']) data['gender'] = enc.transform(data['gender']) ...


2

One option would be to just add these two new features to your CountVectorizer matrix as columns. As you are not performing any tf-idf, your count matrix is going to be filled with integers so you could encode your new columns as int values. You might have to try several encodings but you can start with something like: sentiment [-5,...,5] transformed to ...


2

The main problem with your approach is you are confusing the feature selection transformer with the final estimator. What you will need to do is create two stages, the transformer first: rf_feature_imp = RandomForestClassifier(100) feat_selection = SelectFromModel(rf_feature_imp, threshold=0.5) Then you need a second phase where you use the reduced ...


2

The target in Boston dataset is continuous. You are using svm.SVC, which is a classification algorithm (Support Vector Classification). You can do a regression with svm.SVR on this dataset. import matplotlib.pyplot as plt from sklearn import datasets from sklearn import svm boston = datasets.load_boston() X, y = boston.data, boston.target reg = ...


2

Should this really be the case because of the scaling done to the training data? Yes, this is expected behavior. You trained your model on scaled data, thus it will only work with scaled data. If so, is there an easy way to scale the raw values too? Yes, just save your scaler. # Training scaler = StandardScaler() X_train = ...


2

This is modified from the docs from sklearn import datasets from sklearn.ensemble import ExtraTreesClassifier iris = datasets.load_iris() #sample data X, y = iris.data, iris.target model = ExtraTreesClassifier(n_estimators=10000, n_jobs=-1, random_state=0) model.fit_transform(X,y) # fit the dataset to your model I think feature_importances_ is what ...


2

Mask the nan values by using ~isnull(): mask = ~dataset['v3'].isnull() dataset['v3'][mask] = enc.fit_transform(dataset['v3'][mask]) Another way is to use the pandas.factorize function, which takes care of the nans automatically (assigns them -1): dataset['v3'] = dataset['v3'].factorize()[0]


2

np.concatenate((x[0:3,:], y[0:3,:]), axis=0) Or np.vstack((x[0:3,:],y[0:3,:]))


2

You using array2 as your target labels. GaussianNB() is a classifier, so target labels must be integers.(in your case 0.3 is float) If your labels are real numbers, consider using Regression.


1

I think you've got a bit confused with your X and y here. You want to transform you X into a tf-idf vector and train using this against y. See below from sklearn.svm import SVC from sklearn.grid_search import GridSearchCV from sklearn.cross_validation import KFold from sklearn.feature_extraction.text import TfidfVectorizer from sklearn import datasets ...


1

One way is to call the feature selector's transform() on the feature names, but it has to be presented the feature names in the form of an list of examples. First you must obtain the feature selection phase from the best estimator found in the GridSearchCV. fs = gs.best_estimator_.named_steps['fs'] Create an example list from the feature_names: ...


1

The most concise solution is probably c = np.r_[x[:3], y[:3]] (The most concise solution isn't necessarily the most readable solution.)


1

You could probably use Random Forest for your classification problem. There are basically 3 parameters to deal with data imbalance. Class Weight, Samplesize and Cutoff. Class Weight-The higher the weight a class is given, the more its error rate is decreased. Samplesize- Oversample the minority class to improve class imbalance while sampling the defects ...


1

Not exactly the same code; partial_fit uses total_samples: " total_samples : int, optional (default=1e6) Total number of documents. Only used in the partial_fit method." https://github.com/scikit-learn/scikit-learn/blob/c957249/sklearn/decomposition/online_lda.py#L184 (partial fit) ...


1

hidden_layer_sizes=(7,) if you want only 1 hidden layer with 7 hidden units. length = n_layers - 2 is because you have 1 input layer and 1 output layer.


1

You've mis-spelt sklearn as sklern.


1

The answer to your first question is yes, the amount by which it will affect your results depends on the algorithm. My advive would be to keep an eye on the class-based statistics such as recall and precision (found in classification_report). For RandomForest() you can look at this thread which discusses the sample weight parameter. In general ...


1

Short Answer: Yes, that's what it means (if you don't consider E). Long Answer: See below a code I just did on Jupyter. As you can see I generate some data with some "noise" then fit it with sklearn.linear_model.LinearRegression. Then I get my coefficient (+intercept) and you see that the regression is actually x.coeff+intercept which is your K1*F1 if I'm ...


1

Imagine following labels and splitting [010|101|10] So you have 8 data points, 4 per class and you split it to 3 folds, leading to 2 folds with 3 elements and one with 2. Now let us assume that during cross validation you get following preds [010|100|00] thus, your scores are [100%, 67%, 50%], and cross val score (as an average) is around 72%. Now what ...


1

Hashtags are usually just tags, thus one object can have many of them. In such setting there is no multiclass scenario - and you should have just a single SGD binary classifier per tag. You can obviously fit more complex models taking into account reasoning between tags, but SGD is not duing so, thus using it in a provided setting does not make any more ...


1

I'm not sure if I understand your question, but you seem to want to join categories into supercategories. This should not be hard to do, but it's less than optimal to do this at a late stage of the experiment. If you want to reduce the number of categories, do this by joining some of the categories as the very first step of your process. That way, similar ...


1

Here is some sample code using matplotlib (EDIT: added grid and switching off the interpolation) import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot as plt confmat=np.random.rand(90,90) ticks=np.linspace(0, 89,num=90) plt.imshow(confmat, interpolation='none') plt.colorbar() plt.xticks(ticks,fontsize=6) plt.yticks(ticks,fontsize=6) plt.grid(True) plt.show()


1

Alternatively, you can use pandas's get_dummies function, which performs label encoding and one hot encoding. In: import pandas as pd s = pd.DataFrame(list('abca')) s = pd.get_dummies(s) print s Out: a b c 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 2 0 0 1 3 1 0 0


1

If you are using 0.17 you can use SelectFromModel from sklearn import datasets from sklearn.ensemble import RandomForestClassifier from sklearn.feature_selection import SelectFromModel iris = datasets.load_iris() X, y = iris.data, iris.target model = RandomForestClassifier(5000) new_model = SelectFromModel(model, threshold=0.5) From this example, there ...



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