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90

Sure, just index it as you normally would. E.g. y = x[:k, :] This will return a view into the original array. No data will be copied, and any updates made to y will be reflected in x and vice versa. Edit: I commonly work with >10GB 3D arrays of uint8's, so I worry about this a lot... Numpy can be very efficient at memory management if you keep a few ...


33

You can also use joblib.dump and joblib.load which is much more efficient at handling numerical arrays than the default python pickler. Joblib is included in scikit-learn: >>> from sklearn.externals import joblib >>> from sklearn.datasets import load_digits >>> from sklearn.linear_model import SGDClassifier >>> digits = ...


16

Classifiers are just objects that can be pickled and dumped like any other. To continue your example: import cPickle # save the classifier with open('my_dumped_classifier.pkl', 'wb') as fid: cPickle.dump(gnb, fid) # load it again with open('my_dumped_classifier.pkl', 'rb') as fid: gnb_loaded = cPickle.load(fid)


9

The actions described on the scikit-learn website work irrespective of the scikit-learn version in EPD. Python will automatically use the scikit-learn version set in the PYTHONPATH environment variable, which you should set to the directory path of the Git version of scikit-learn. If you use Bash on a Unix-like system, you should do the following: Perform ...


8

Yes your solution looks alright. To pass the raw memory of a numpy array directly to a C program you can use the ctypes helpers from numpy or wrap you C program with cython and call it directly by passing the numpy array (see the doc at http://cython.org for more details). However, I am not sure that trying to speedup the prediction on a GPU is the easiest ...


7

This was a bug in scikit-learn that I fixed five minutes ago. Thanks for spotting it. I suggest you either upgrade to the newest version from Github, or separate the vectorizer from the pipeline as a workaround: count = CountVectorizer(vocabulary=myvocab) X_vectorized = count.transform(X_train) text_classifier = Pipeline([ ('tfidf', ...


7

The coefficients are attributes of the estimator object--that you created when you instantiated the Logistic Regression class--so you can access them in the normal python way: >>> import numpy as NP >>> from sklearn import datasets >>> from sklearn import datasets as DS >>> digits = DS.load_digits() >>> D = ...


6

I am not sure what you mean by 10*10 cross validation. The ShuffleSplit configuration you give will make you call the fit method of the estimator 10 times. If you call this 10 times by explicitly using an outer loop or directly call it 100 times with 10% of the data reserved for testing in a single loop if you use instead: >>> ss = ...


6

Statsmodels has scipy.stats as a dependency. Scipy.stats has all of the probability distributions and some statistical tests. It's more like library code in the vein of numpy and scipy. Statsmodels on the other hand provides statistical models with a formula framework similar to R and it works with pandas DataFrames. There are also statistical tests, ...


5

If you use scikits' vectorizers (CountVectorizer or TfidfVectorizer are good as a first attempt) you get a sparse matrix representation. From the documentation: vectorizer = TfidfVectorizer(sublinear_tf=True, max_df=0.5, stop_words='english') X_train = vectorizer.fit_transform(data_train.data) #initialize your classifier clf.fit(X_train, y_train)


5

1) This is expected: small gamma and small regularization will select more support vectors hence the model will be more complex and longer to fit. 2) There is a cache_size argument that will be passed to the underlying libsvm library. However depending on your data, libsvm might or might not use all of the available cache. 3) No idea. I you run more timed ...


5

Missing values are simply not supported in scikit-learn. There has been discussion on the mailing list about this before, but no attempt to actually write code to handle them. Whatever you do, don't use NaN to encode missing values, since many of the algorithms refuse to handle samples containing NaNs. The above answer is outdated; the latest release of ...


5

You have a lot of questions there but I'll try to help. As far as I remember, TF-IDF should not be a negative value. TF is the term frequency (how often a term appears in a particular document) and the inverse document frequency (# of documents in corpus / # of documents that include the term). That's then usually log weighted. We often add one to the ...


5

There is a Windows binary build of scikits.audiolab (and a whole lot of other stuff) for python 2.7 here: http://www.lfd.uci.edu/~gohlke/pythonlibs/#scikits.audiolab audiolab will also require libsndfile. The link is right there on that page, but I'll put it here too since libsndfile is great: http://www.mega-nerd.com/libsndfile/#Download PS: You will ...


5

The coef_ vectors is a view on the parameters learned by the machine learning algorithm. It does not make sense to set them by hand as they are automatically tuned optimally from the data. What you can do instead is: set class_weight if you have prior knowledge about some classes being more important than others set sample_weight if if you have prior ...


4

Is it ok to use the same data in the grid search that I will be using during the real classification? It is ok to use this data for training (fitting) a classifier. Cross validation, as done by StratifiedKFold, is intended for situations where you don't have enough data to hold out a validation set while optimizing the hyperparameters (the algorithm ...


4

A complement to HYRY's answer if you want to shuffle consistently several arrays x, y, z with same first dimension: x.shape[0] == y.shape[0] == z.shape[0] == n_samples. You can do: rng = np.random.RandomState(42) # reproducible results with a fixed seed indices = np.arange(n_samples) rng.shuffle(indices) x_shuffled = x[indices] y_shuffled = y[indices] ...


4

Indeed, the estimator.coef_ and estimator.intercept_ attributes are read-only python properties instead of usual python attributes. Their values come from the estimator.raw_coef_ array whose memory layout directly maps the expected memory layout of the underlying liblinear C++ implementation of logistic regression so as to avoid any memory copy of the ...


4

In scikit-learn there is a sklearn.metrics.euclidean_distances function that works both for sparse matrices and dense numpy arrays. See the reference documentation. However non-euclidean distances are not yet implemented for sparse matrices.


4

Could you provide your R code? I'd be interested in knowing how this is dealt with in R. The problem here is that you're only passing y to boot.ci, but every time it runs my_function, it uses the entire, original x (note the lack of x input to my_function). Bootstrapping applies the statistic function to resampled data, so if you're applying your statistic ...


3

First, the problem you posed (being able to tile audio samples while automatically removing the quiet space between them) is not one that can be solved with threading. You need to analyze the recorded sound to determine where there is or is not silence, or simply allow the user to specify when recording should end. You can accomplish the latter with a simple ...


3

Here's a numpy implementation of some Matlab code for matrix whitening I got from here. def whiten(X,fudge=1E-18): from numpy import dot, sqrt, diag from numpy.linalg import eigh # the matrix X should be observations-by-components # get the covariance matrix Xcov = dot(X.T,X) # eigenvalue decomposition of the covariance matrix d,V = ...


3

If you can afford this, consider using LinearSVC: libsvm-based SVCs have training complexity between O(n_features * n_samples^2) and O(n_features * n_samples^3), while LinearSVC (based on liblinear) has O(n_features*n_samples) training complexity and O(n_features) test complexity.


3

If you want to cross validate a score, use the sklearn.cross_validation.cross_val_score utility function and pass it the scoring function you like from the sklearn.metrics module: http://scikit-learn.org/dev/modules/cross_validation.html


3

You're looking at the documentation for 0.11 (to be released soon), where the vectorizer has been overhauled. Check the documentation for 0.10, where there is no tokenizer argument and the analyzer should be an object implementing an analyze method: class MyAnalyzer(object): @staticmethod def analyze(s): return s.split() v = ...


3

It is not (yet?) possible to pass precomputed or lazily computed user defined distance functions to the kNN models. However in the master branch, now you have the possibility to use arbitrary p for p-Minkowsky distances: https://github.com/scikit-learn/scikit-learn/pull/742 It would be quite easy to make it possible to pass arbitrary user defined distance ...


2

is your issue how to get the predicted y values of your regression? Or is it how to use the regression coefficients to get predicted y values for a different set of samples for the exogenous variables? pandas y_predict and y_fitted should give you the same value and both should give you the same values as the predict method in scikits.statsmodels. If you're ...


2

The best solution really depends on details your not giving. By the way, you should really give your code, or at least the np.loadtxt instruction. In the following, "data" is the array loaded from the file using: data = np.loadtxt('file.txt', [('x',float), ('y',float), ('value',float)]) 1) Direct reshape: Following on what @tom10 said If you know that ...


2

scale_C=True (deprecated in the dev version and scheduled for removal in 0.12) causes the regularization parameter C to be divided by the number of samples before it is handed to the underlying LibSVM implementation. shrinking enables or disables the "shrinking heuristic", described by Joachims 1999, that should speed up SVM training.


2

I am interesting in this theme too. When I am using baes classification (may be this russian article about baes algorithm can help you http://habrahabr.ru/blogs/python/120194/) I use only 20 top word of documents. I tried many values. In my exeperimental top 20 get best result. Also I changed usual tf-idf to this: def f(word): idf = log10(0.5 / word.df) ...



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