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8

You have a return false inside the if, therefore the only time those two log statements will be reached is if the if condition wasn't true and the block controlled by the if didn't run. And if the block didn't run, then yy wasn't assigned a value. It's in scope, but uninitialized.


5

You are confusing the scope of a variable with the storage duration. As mentioned in the C11 standard, chapter §6.2.1, Scopes of identifiers, for file scope [...] If the declarator or type specifier that declares the identifier appears outside of any block or list of parameters, the identifier has file scope, which terminates at the end of the ...


5

There is no such thing as "declaring a global variable with setq", there is only "set the value of a variable with setq" and if you're doing that in the top lexical environment, the results are amusingly under-defined. If you look at what the variable varname contains, it may well be the list (poop). Also, the "q" at the end of setq actually means "quoted" ...


4

You're setting the value of the local variable varname, not the global variable whose name it contains. To do what you want you need to use the symbol-value accessor to indirect through it to get the global value's variable. (defun myfun (varname) (setf (symbol-value varname) '(poop)))


4

You can use the builtin locals() function: PICKLE_FILENAME_INSTRUCTION_IDS = 'pickled_instruction_ids.txt' def compare_instruction_id_list_with_baseline(baselineidspicklefile): baseline_ids = load_pickled_ids(baselineidspicklefile) current_main_url_content = get_page_content(main_url_test) root = lh.fromstring(current_main_url_content) ...


4

checkForActivity is defined only in the scope of createServer(). In changeCheckForActivity(), it is not yet defined if createServer() is async and anyways not visible. var net = require('net'); var checkForActivity = false; net.createServer(function(sock){ sock.on('data',function(data){ changeCheckForActivity(); }); }); function ...


3

Variables are local to the functions; you need to return the relevant values you want to share to the caller and pass them to the next function that uses them. Like this: def get_two_nums(): ... # define the relevant variables return op, n1, n2, ans def question(op, num1, num2, answer): ... # do something with the variables Now you ...


3

Why not return a tuple? def get_two_nums(): ... ... op = ... num1 = ... num2 = ... answer = ... return op, num1, num2, answer def question(): op, num1, num2, answer = get_two_nums() response = int(input("What is {} {} {}? ".format(num1, op, num2))) if response == answer: # the rest of your logic here


3

If you return a reference, you'll get a reference. It means print $ref would return REF(0x600077f10) And you'll need to dereference it to get the file handle. It wouldn't disappear after leaving the subroutine, as there's still a reference pointing to it: the one you return (given you assign it to a variable). As you probably know, Perl uses ...


3

In your first function, there is no problem returning str[1] as it is not pointing to a local variable, it is a pointer to a string literal. Note that string literals should be declared const: const char *func1(void) { const char *str[3] = { "so", "is", "amazing" }; return str[1]; } Your second function returns a pointer to allocated space. ...


2

Please refer to https://github.com/angular/angular.js/wiki/Understanding-Scopes What happens is that the child scope gets its own property that hides/shadows the parent property of the same name. This is not something AngularJS is doing – this is how JavaScript prototypal inheritance works. Please see updated code pen I've changed ...


2

I tried to solve this problem by using controller as syntax. With controllerAs syntax, there is no confusion about scope. Here is the working code <div ng-controller="MyController as myctrl"> <card-panel layout-margin> <h1>MyDemo</h1> <md-input-container class="md-block"> <label> demo ...


2

Marking something as static within a function relocates its storage off of the stack and allows its value to persist across multiple calls. Marking something static, however, does nothing to change the scope of the variable. While you certainly could create a pointer that is aimed at bar and manipulate it from main, the compiler will view bar as undefined ...


2

You forgot to initiate the digest cycle by calling $scope.$apply() after you modify the scope variable from non-angular context. success: function (data, status, xhr) { $scope.req_result = "Post succeeded"; $scope.$apply(); }, error: function (xhr) { $scope.req_result = "ERROR: " + xhr.responseText $scope.$apply(); } Angular does the ...


2

In the case you are talking about, static methods are a reasonable choice. Static methods/members belong to the class itself and not to any one instance. Some refer to this as belonging to all instances of the class, but that is not quite the same meaning. Static methods are meant to be stateless (meaning that they don't depend on anything else but what ...


2

I'm going to ignore the four star pointer for now and stick to what's giving OP the most immediate grief. A quick walk-through: Cell(int currentLevel, int currentRow, int currentColumn) { level = currentLevel; row = currentRow; column = currentColumn; Not bad to here. But... ptrFunction = new *fArray[3]; This says assign to the ...


2

You cannot simply pass them, because variables in get_two_nums are defined only in scope of get_two_numsfunction. So basically you have two options: Return their values as tuple into scope of another function as @TimPietzcker and @Tgsmith61591 proposed. Define variables within get_two_nums function as globals ( see global statement, for more info) as ...


2

They are local to the sprite function. The other functions you mention are defined inside the sprite function and so have access to any variables that are in its scope. They continue to be available after the sprite function has finished because they have been returned. This is called a closure.


2

According to the accepted answer for this question Why can functions in Python print variables in enclosing scope but cannot use them in assignment?, there is an additional statement added in Python 3: nonlocal that does what you want. It is like global, but says to look at the enclosing scope instead of the module level. The following modification should ...


2

The variable the function is assigned to is limited only by its scope, which is guaranteed to include the scope where the function is declared in. if() { } is not a function... it is a block. the reason it is not showing up in your example is because you have return false which breaks before the log happens, and when the logs do happen then the variable ...


2

You can pass the information along: var showForecast = { 'init': function () { this.getData(); }, 'buildView': function(data){ var code = 'Hey, you\'re from ' + data.city; $('body').append(code); }, 'getData': function () { $.getJSON('http://ipinfo.io/', function (data) { console.log(data); showForecast.buildView(data); ...


2

There are a few ways you can to this. What you have currently would work with a little modification: var rownum; $('#myTable').find('tr').click( function(){ rownum=$(this).index() alert('You clicked row '+ (rownum) ); }); Hovever, the preferred method would be to pass the variable where it's needed: function alertRowNumber(rowNumber) { alert('You ...


2

<script langguage='text/javascript'> var rownum = ""; $('#myTable').find('tr').click( function(){ rownum=$(this).index(); alert('You clicked row '+ (rownum) ); }); </script> Do not usevar, just define rownum outside so it will be global and you can access anywhere. Also you can not call find() directly.


1

There is no way to access the data variable itself. That is locally scoped to the anonymous function you pass to getJSON (and getJSON passes it as an argument, which is beyond your control). You have to copy the value somewhere. In your particular example, there are no scopes shared between getData and buildView other than the global scope. So if you want ...


1

checkForActivity is defined in a function and therefore it's in that functions scope. Within the scope for function changeCheckForActivity() checkForActivity has not been defined. If you define checkForActivity outside of the function, it will be accessible by both functions: var net = require('net'); var checkForActivity = false; ...


1

If you are intent on using f.radio_button then you could add the parameter checked: (c=='One-Shot') You could also use r.collection_radio_buttons instead: <% categories = ['One-Shot', 'Ongoing'] %> <%= f.collection_radio_buttons :category, categories, :to_s, :to_s, {checked: 'One-Shot'} %>


1

EDIT: didn't notice this first: You have local varname and global varname both in the scope of the function body. Local name shadows the global name. So, if you change the local name to var it should work the way you wrote (checked in SBCL 1.2.13). But consider the following stylistic corrections: For global variables, please use ear-muffs * around the ...


1

when i am trying to access the emails array outside the method getMessage it is empty. this line of code "console.log(emails.length);" always prints 0 Timing! I'm pretty sure, you wanted to build this: function getMessage( messages, callback ) { var emails = []; get(0); function get(index){ if(index === messages.length){ ...


1

After you get the name from the user you have to pass playerName as a String argument to any function where you want to use it. I also changed your class name to camel case. import java.util.Scanner; import java.util.Random; public class CrapsGame { //generates random number to be used in method rollDice private Random randomNumbers = new Random(); ...


1

Second alert will not show because there's nothing in $scope.orders when you alert it. That's the nature of asynchronous calls, only when you enter the success/error sections will you have something there (or not...). Until the server returns your response and the success/error functions trigger, that variable is still unpopulated since $scope.orders=data ...



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