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3

Be sure to support arbitrary keyword arguments in your spider and call __init__ with super() like shown in the docs for spider arguments: class MySpider(scrapy.Spider): name = 'myspider' def __init__(self, category=None, *args, **kwargs): super(MySpider, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs) # <- important self.category = category ...


2

You will want to use any of the multiple approaches to removing a character from a string in Python. strip() only removes whitespace from the start and end. Going with a method similar to what you're already doing: string = ''.join(c for c in list if c not in '\r\t\n') string0 = ''.join(c for c in list0 if c not in '\r\t\n') You could also just add ...


2

You failed to replace the special chars. Try this: filename = os.path.join(directory,experience['Title'][0]+'.txt') filename = filename.replace('\\' , "").replace('?' , "") UPDATE You just want to specify a legal file name. So I come up with an idea like this. directory = os.path.join('Erowid/archive/',experience['Substance'][0].strip().lower()) ...


2

The problem is simple: the callback has to be different than parse, so I suggest you name your method parse_site for example and then you are ready to continue your scraping. If you make the change below it will work: rules = (Rule(LinkExtractor(allow=(r'.*categories/.*', )), callback='parse_site', follow=True),) def parse_site(self, response): The ...


2

The problem is, there are multiple elements with email-input class, and the first one, that is actually located, is invisible. You need the one in the page container: self.driver.find_element_by_css_selector("#page-container .email-input")


1

You have decimal places in the string, so a simple cast is not going to work. You can do a double conversion: cast(cast(ticketprice as decimal(10, 2)) as int) or: (ticketprice::decimal(10, 2))::int (The parens are not strictly necessary.) EDIT: Or, as Erwin points out, just use numeric: (ticketprice::numeric)::int Postgres is much smarter about ...


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This is what you'd use the meta Keyword for. def parse(self, response): for sel in response.xpath('//tbody/tr'): item = HeroItem() # Item assignment here url = 'https://' + item['server'] + '.battle.net/' + sel.xpath('td[@class="cell-BattleTag"]//a/@href').extract()[0].strip() yield Request(url, ...


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You can override / implement the parse_start_url function and there call parse_1 or parse_2 when the response.url meets your criteria (in this case it is the right URL). def parse_start_url(response): if response.url == 'http://111sssssssss.com': parse_1(response) if response.url == 'http://222sssssssssssss.com': parse_2(response) ...


1

After a lot of research, I found a way to setup my Scrapy project to work with TOR on Windows OS: Download TOR Expert Bundle for Windows (1) and unzip the files to a folder (ex. \tor-win32-0.2.6.10). The recent TOR's versions for Windows don't come with a graphical user interface (2). It is probably possible to setup TOR only through config files and cmd ...


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How that page is setup, and how you are selecting things, all you're grabbing is one pair, in the form of a tuple. When you do zip(divs_title.xpath('.//a/text( )'), divs_title.xpath('.//a/@href') you return a one item list of the tag text, and a one item list of the href content. You zip the together, and get one item. The (not-good) solution is to try ...


1

As Andrea already mentioned this is the outcome when you mix unicode and str objects. The documentation of Scrapy (http://doc.scrapy.org/en/latest/topics/selectors.html) says that methods like .css() return unicode objects so text is of type unicode and key must be of type str. 0xe9 is likely to be the encoded character é in native Windows text encoding. So ...



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