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6

In PHP, in contrast to JS and many other languages, the ternary operator is left-associative. This means your expression is equivalent to $percent = (($percent > 100) ? 100 : ($percent < 0)) ? 0 : $percent; And since ($percent > 100) ? 100 : ($percent < 0) evaluates to 100 in this case, it's as if you had written $percent = 100 ? 0 : ...


3

You can try to use the built in sorted method, eg for line in sorted(os.listdir(d)): f.write(line + "\n") Here's some more information from python documentation that you might find helpful: https://docs.python.org/2/library/os.html os.listdir(path) Return a list containing the names of the entries in the directory given by path. The list is in ...


2

Your code prints 0 due to operator priorities. This one works fine: <?php $percent = 105; $percent = ($percent > 100) ? 100 : (($percent < 0) ? 0 : $percent); echo $percent;


2

You should use the case-sensitive operator: S== From Logiclib documentation: Case-sensitive string tests (using System.dll): a S== b; a S!= b


2

One way to do it in awk awk -F, '!x[substr($2,0,5)]++{i++}END{print i}' abc.csv


2

Lots of ways to do this. Here's one: switch -Regex ([math]::truncate([math]::log($bytecount,1024))) { '^0' {"$bytecount Bytes"} '^1' {"{0:n2} KB" -f ($bytecount / 1kb)} '^2' {"{0:n2} MB" -f ($bytecount / 1mb)} '^3' {"{0:n2} GB" -f ($bytecount / 1gb)} ...


2

You want to put program1 into the background with &: program1&; program2; kill $! then it will run along with program2. kill $! ($! being the pid of most recently backgrounded process -- i.e. program1) will start after program2 terminates. If program1 is still running, kill $! will terminte it.


1

this is what you want: $percent = ($percent > 100 ? 100 : ($percent < 0 ? 0 : $percent)); Or maybe a bit simpler, like this: $percent = min(100, max(0, $percent));


1

You can use File::Find or File::Find::Rule: use strict; use warnings; use autodie; use File::Find::Rule; # find all the .dat files in . my @files = File::Find::Rule->file() ->name( '*.dat' ) ->in( '.' ); for my ($file) { my $data = do { open my $fh, '<', $file; local ...


1

Assuming you have a Bash shell, you can use a simple for loop combined with grep: for file in `grep -lr some_attr | uniq` do perl script_name.pl $file done


1

No need to fork and rely on awk if you're using bash: read -ra FIELDS < "$PWD/file.txt" for A in "${FIELDS[@]:1}"; do case "$A" in DIC|IC|RNDIC) # <do some things> break ;; esac done Or function is_type1 { local FIELDS A read -ra FIELDS < "$1" for A in "${FIELDS[@]:1}"; do case "$A" in ...


1

You can call exit after printing 1 once: type=$(awk 'NR==1 { for (i = 1; i <= NF; i++) { if (i != 1 && ($i == "DIC" || $i == "IC" || $i == "RNDIC")) { print "1" exit } } }' $PWD/file.txt)


1

use command grouping with { ... } instead of ( ... ), as in [[ $var1 = "N" ]] || { command 1; var=N; echo $var; } this avoids subshelling the grouped commands list, and thereby keeps the value assigned to the variable. This works with both AT&T and MirBSD Korn Shells.


1

There are a few convoluted ways to go about doing this. 1) Invoke another instance of the Excel application and run the Macro using that. Then how would you know whether it's done? You pass a global variable by reference to it. And use the OnTime functionality to keep checking every few seconds if its done or not. An example for calling another excel ...



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