Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

Your library linking directive are wrong -- -l prefixes lib to the name you specify, and then searches through the libdir path set by the -L options. So what you want is something like: SDL = -L$(LIB_DIR) -lSDL -lSDL2main You can make it clearer/more standard by using the standard varnames for libraries: LDFLAGS = -L$(LIB_DIR) LDLIBS = -lSDL -lSDL2main ...


0

For anyone interested, Nsight captures all commands issued to the OpenGL server. Not just those issued through your application. If you have any FPS or recording software enabled, these tend to use deprecated methods drawing to the framebuffer. In my case it was Riva Tuner which displays the FPS on screen for any running games. Disabling it resolved my ...


1

I think you misunderstand how mouse events work. You do not get a SDL_MOUSEMOTION event while the mouse is moving. Instead you get a SDL_MOUSEMOTION event when the mouse is moved. That is, the event represents a single instant in time. If you want to do something when the mouse is moved, your best option is to do it as direct response to the mouse event. If ...


0

There's a bit too much of a mess here to go over everything, but here's something... You need to decide if you are using SDL 1.2 or SDL 2.0. They are distinct libraries and come in separate frameworks. Your compile errors with SDL_WM_SetCaption etc. are from code which uses SDL 1.2. Also decide if you will use a framework for SDL or if you will link to ...


0

Code::Blocks makes object files for each file that it compiles as separate compilation units. It will compile and link together any files that are part of the project which it identifies as a source file. First, remove your #includes of the cpp files. Then try the Project > Add files... menu option to add those other cpp files to the project.


0

Do not mix screen surface emulation with the new SDL_Render API. That is, do not use SDL_GetWindowSurface at all. Also, don't clear the renderer every time you draw something. Only clear it once per frame, before you draw all your stuff. Move your repeated block with SDL_RenderClear, SDL_RenderCopy, and SDL_RenderPresent out of your event loop.


0

Worked when I used the keycodes directly, instead of converting scancodes const auto sdlKeyCodes = {...SDLK_a, SDLK_F1, SDLK_SPACE, SDLK_LSHIFT ...etc} SDL_PumpEvents(); const auto sdlKeyStatesPtr = SDL_GetKeyboardState(nullptr); for(auto sdlKeyCode: sdlKeyCodes ) { const bool downKeyCode = sdlKeyStatesPtr[sdlKeyCode]; }


3

TL;DR solution --> Change your code to (*screen)->format. Reason: As per the operator precedence rule, The -> operator [Structure and union member access through pointer] has higher priority over the * [Indirection (dereference)] operator. So, your code *screen->format, is effectively behaving like *(screen->format) which means, it's ...


2

The unary * dereference operator has lower operator precedence than the structure pointer access operator ->. That means you're actually doing *(screen->format). You need some parentheses to get the right precedence: (*screen)->format


0

I am the author of tiny file dialog on sourceforge. It is a single C file with just five function calls including message box and question dialog. It has no main loop and complement SDL easily.


0

Few things you have to check first is the font loaded properly? check if "font == NULL", maybe your font path is wrong is the shader (if you use a shader) setup properly? My guess is that you set the wrong pixel format type in glTexImage2D cause random color dots apear on your texture Below is my code that load image via SDL_image for OpenGL use, I ...


2

One thing you could add is to specify texture filters, e.g. glTexParameteri(GL_TEXTURE_2D, GL_TEXTURE_MAG_FILTER, GL_LINEAR); glTexParameteri(GL_TEXTURE_2D, GL_TEXTURE_MIN_FILTER, GL_LINEAR);


0

The array returned by SDL_GetKeyboardState should be indexed by scancodes in SDL 2.0, not keycodes as in SDL 1.2. Try doing it without the SDL_SCANCODE_TO_KEYCODE conversion. For reference: https://wiki.libsdl.org/SDL_GetKeyboardState Also, I should point out that SDL_SCANCODE_TO_KEYCODE is not a general-use conversion macro. It simply sets an upper bit ...


0

There's a common mistake here. SDL_Event is a union, so you should not be using the event.button field if you have checked that the type is SDL_MOUSEMOTION. In other words, you are invoking undefined behavior and it is not a problem with SDL and the right mouse button. Instead, use the motion.state field: if(pEvent.type == SDL_MOUSEMOTION && ...


0

Try to replace: if (pEvent.type == SDL_MOUSEMOTION && pEvent.button.button == SDL_BUTTON_RIGHT) { deltaX += pEvent.motion.x; deltaY += pEvent.motion.y; pCamera.rotate(deltaX / REFRESH_RATE, deltaY / REFRESH_RATE); cout << "Mouse = (" << deltaX << ", " << deltaY ...


2

you throw away the strings as soon as you read them leading to the vSource referencing deleted memory (and undefined behavior), instead keep the sources as std::string while you need the char* to remain valid: std::string vSource = readFile("vertexShader.gl"); char* vSourcecharp = vSource.c_str(); // Read fragment shader std::string fSource = ...


1

C uses pass by value for function argument passing. It seems, your setImages() function changes the argument pointers itself. Inside setImages() function, you can alter the values pointed by the passed pointers, not the pointers themselves. After returning, in main(), your pointers remain unchanged [uninitialized, if were before the call]. To achieve the ...


1

Like the others state, your program terminates immediately so the window should "flash" momentarily. You can have the window appear for a few seconds by using SDL_Delay: SDL_Window *win = SDL_CreateWindow("Hello World!", 100, 100, 640, 480, SDL_WINDOW_SHOWN); if (win == nullptr){ std::cout << "SDL_CreateWindow Error: " << SDL_GetError() ...


0

Assuming SDL_Init() and other declarations were just removed when pasting here. First, you are not using correct indexes. As explained in the documentation here : "Indexes into this array are obtained by using SDL_Scancode values." But you are using SDL_Keycode values. The other problem is that you are using the non-blocking SDL_PollEvent and calling ...


0

Not sure if this applies to you, but all I needed was one call to glUseProgram(NULL); to tell opengl to use the fixed function pipeline, and the problem was fixed.


1

Without going into depth on your OpenGL usage (which @ratchetfreak already did in a separate answer), you have a very fundamental C++ problem. You're declaring a bunch of variables at the start of your Cube.cpp file: Shader* shader; GLuint tex; GLuint shaderProgram, fragmentShader, vertexShader; GLuint vbo, ebo; GLfloat x, y, z; GLfloat r, g, b; With ...


3

none of the state you set in the create function will persist beyond another call to it. First you should move the values to members of the cube class. Then in create you should create and use a vao: glGenVertexArrays(1, &vao); glBindVertexArray(vao); glBindBuffer(GL_ELEMENT_ARRAY_BUFFER, ebo); Before specifying the vertex layout. Then during the ...


0

You are attempting to use SDL_Rect variables as pointers but not allocating memory for them. One option would be to allocate memory with new but in most cases you would just use them on the stack or as class member variables. Your code would be as follows: SDL_Rect rect_One; rect_One.h=20; rect_One.w=i; rect_One.x=0; rect_One.y=0; SDL_Rect rect_Two; ...


1

This is a threading problem. SDL starts SDLMain() in a separate thread so calling those Java methods is problematic! Ideal solution would be to run SDL in some unthreaded mode as mentioned here http://theorangeduck.com/page/issues-sdl-ios-and-android but I have solved my immediate problem by exposing sendCommand in SDLActivity public boolean ...


0

SDL_AddTimer() with a callback that uses SDL_PushEvent() to post a user message to the event queue: /* Start the timer; the callback below will be executed after the delay */ Uint32 delay = (33 / 10) * 10; /* To round it down to the nearest 10 ms */ SDL_TimerID my_timer_id = SDL_AddTimer(delay, my_callbackfunc, my_callback_param); ... Uint32 ...


0

I had art runtime errors 'check_jni.cc #65' in art runtime also. Not exact your type issue but ndk issues in art on same line in 'check_jni' In general, I had to spend lot time reviewing the first 2 parms in passed parm list (jniEnv, object ...) Older cpp libs tend to contain string constant with incorrect package delimited char val rejected @65 in ...


0

Download latest SDL fromework from here (scroll down to “Development Libraries"). Copy the SDL2.framework bundle to /Library/Frameworks (may require root permissions) If XCode crashes due to code-signing issues, run this from terminal: codesign -f -s - /Library/Frameworks/SDL2.framework/SDL2 Create a Cocoa project in XCode. Strip out superflous files and ...


1

Drop the SDL part. You have Qt, which does everything SDL does as well. Just subclass a QGLWidget and use that.


1

Drawing on a screen using a function for every pixel is going to be slow. You can manually write the pixels in a loop and avoid the cost of calling the function every time or use one of the SDL provided functions that do that for you: SDL_RenderFillRect SDL_RenderDrawLines SDL_RenderDrawPoints SDL_RenderDrawRect


0

First of all, you should not use #include on other cpp files, you can read about it here: include cpp Secondly when you are trying to compile a project composed of separate files you should use the g++ command like this: g++ main.cpp link.cpp link2.cpp etc' you can read a basic explanation about it here: use the g++ command To do exactly what you asked ...


0

You should be handling events as they come. Your code uses multiple calls to SDL_PollEvent() and even shortcircuits the polling in some cases. Move all of your event handling code into the while loop. Remove the additional checks on the while loop so you stay in the loop until all events are processed. A quick modification of your code might look ...


2

Use SDL_GetKeyName() to get a printable string that represents the key pressed. Since SDL_Keycode (SDLKey in SDL1.2) is implemented as an enumeration, it cannot be simply converted to a printable character, particularly for keys like "shift" and "alt". Try this: std::cout << SDL_GetKeyName(event.key.keysym.sym) << std::endl;


0

You would want to clear the surface regions that you are drawing to. If you don't, then the screen surface retains the old renderings from previous frames and you are drawing on top of them. This causes a smearing artifact. An old optimization (no longer so useful with SDL2 or OpenGL) here is to keep track of dirty rectangles and clear each of them, but ...


0

It is unlikely that the pixel format will be changed and if it does, then it wouldn't happen in the middle of your accessing it because the format resides in client memory (touched only by you and SDL). If you still feel concerned about the possibility, then always create surfaces with the SDL_SWSURFACE flag or lock the surface before accessing the format.


1

The SDL 2.0 function SDL_CreateWindowFrom() can set up SDL for input and rendering from a given native window. https://wiki.libsdl.org/SDL_CreateWindowFrom


0

This code is not meant to be instructive! :) Look at the macros and you see that there are several tokenizing macros. These macros combine tokens into new tokens before the compiler sees them and are a simple and effective method for code obfuscation in C and can make the source smaller too. You will have to sift deeply through those macro expansions ...


0

Your where destination rectangle has zero width and zero height (the 3rd and 4th component). You need to set a width and height to see anything. Currently you're blitting into a completely flat rectangle. Try this to see if it works: SDL_BlitSurface(subtitle, NULL, screen, NULL);


1

Memory leaks are not the most obvious things to track down. To properly identify a leak, you'll need to use a profiling tool as mentioned in the comments. The most common reason for what you are seeing is that the OS is free to assign memory to processes before they request it and to delay releasing unused memory. Sometimes this looks like a leak as your ...


1

SDL_CreateRGBSurfaceFrom() does not handle 8-bit true color formats. As you noted, it creates a blank palette for 8-bit depths. The most obvious thing to do is to fill in the palette and just let it do its thing. Here's some code for a grayscale palette: SDL_Color colors[256]; int i; for(i = 0; i < 256; i++) { colors[i].r = colors[i].g = ...


3

You don't handle any events while in the loop. If you don't do that then the event of minimizing will not be handled (usually means the window buffer is freed to be use by someone else).


0

The following tutorial details setting up an SDL project in Xcode and the final, optional section, covers packaging the framework with the app http://zamma.co.uk/setup-sdl2-in-xcode-osx/ Essentially what you need to do is: Create a Copy Files entry in the build phases Set the Destination field to be Frameworks Add the SDL2.framework in the list to be ...


0

Finally solved. As I had a feeling, it was some problem with Windows or Windows 8.1 just shafting me for fun. I was very careful and redownloaded SDL2.0.3 and reapplied that patch thing for SDL_platform.h. THEN I completely uninstalled ALL of the IDEs that I tried, reinstalled Dev C++ in Windows 7 compatibility mode AS an administrator ON the desktop (ie not ...


1

The issue is that you are never letting windows enter the event-loop. The tutorial you are reading from assumes that the window will just show without ever handling the events, which will not happen on all platforms. Just doing SDL_Delay( 2000 ); will just sleep for 2 seconds, but it will not let the thread handle events in the meantime. If you replace ...


0

You should be getting a compiler error; your arguments for SDL_CreateWindow are transposed. SDL_CreateWindow( "SDL Tutorial", SDL_WINDOWPOS_UNDEFINED, SCREEN_WIDTH, SCREEN_HEIGHT, SDL_WINDOW_SHOWN ); Declaration: SDL_Window * SDLCALL SDL_CreateWindow( const char *title, int x, int y, int w, ...


1

You need to start an event loop - or else SDL won't communicate properly with the operating system. Check out the SDL2 section on this web page for some sample code.


0

Alright so I already followed the tutorial regarding correctly configuring SDL in Visual Studio BEFORE I posted this. However I've fixed my problem by installing VS Express with window desktop instead of the community one. Isn't REALLY an answer but it worked for me.


1

please see the following tutorial regarding how to correctly configure SDL in Visual Studio http://zamma.co.uk/setup-sdl2-in-visual-studio/ It looks like you are half way there and that you are just missing the linker configuration for the libraries.


0

This might be a problem with your OpenGL implementation. I could not find anything in the 3.2 spec saying that vertex attributes are required. To the contrary, the first sentence of section "2.11.3 Vertex Attributes" clearly suggests that having vertex attributes is optional: Vertex shaders can define named attribute variables, which are bound to the ...


0

Some workaround that works for me - add event filter for SDL_WINDOWEVENT_SIZE_CHANGED event and do additional SetViewport and draw frame. int SDLApp::eventFilter(void* pthis, const SDL_Event *event) { if (event->type == SDL_WINDOWEVENT && event->window.event == SDL_WINDOWEVENT_SIZE_CHANGED) { SDLApp* app = ...


0

I believe that that you could use the SDL_WINDOW_RESIZABLE flag in SDL_CreateWindow to make the window resizable.



Top 50 recent answers are included