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0

When a user isn't logged in, but the access control allows anonymous users, the user is a string "anon." instead of a UserInterface instance. You should put a check into supportsClass (e.g. return is_object($objec);).


1

No it's not secure. You shouldn't use any hash function for user passwords. Instead you should use a password-based key derivation function such as PBKDF2 or scrypt with an appropriate number of iterations so as to slow down hashing, which mitigates the risk of bruteforce attacks.


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For the most part, probably not. Your salt has to be known in order to decrypt the password, so we can assume that any attacker will be able to gain both the hashed password and the salt used. All that your salt is now protecting against is rainbow table-based attacks and increasing the amount of work (since each plaintext now needs to be hashed n times ...


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It depends on the used hash algorithm, which alphabet of characters is accepted as salt. BCrypt for example will accept following characters, which is nearly but not exactly the same as a base64 encoded text: ./0123456789ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz. A known plain text attack is no problem here, since we do not encrypt anything, ...


1

To show how are secure enough (for most cases) login script should look like, I'm taking some parts of classes from this project: php-login Here is how you would store a password in your database: // crypt the user's password with the PHP 5.5's password_hash() function, results in a 60 character hash string // the PASSWORD_DEFAULT constant is defined by ...


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I used to do exactly what you are doing, but I soon came to realise how bad it is in many cases and one of the most least secured ways of communicating with an SQL database. This website is my go to for connecting to SQL via PHP using PDO connections. I don't remember them off the top of my head so this sits in my bookmarks and has proven to be extremely ...


2

Password encryption scheme About using plaintext passwords, see the other answers. It's not a good choice. BCrypt (readily available with PHP) is the way to go. To be really paranoid you should make it so that, if the user is not in the database, a fake user is recovered with a surely wrong password (e.g. the password supplied by the browser user, plus one ...


1

You should never store passwords as plain text. Doing this may expose all your user's info in case your database is compromised. Since many people use the same password for multiple services, this can be a huge security issue. You should look into password hashing as suggested in the comments. You are also vulnerable to SQL injection. Never use ...


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A bit late, but I usually use the following code: private static final int PASSWORD_SIZE = 16; private static final String VALID_SPECIAL_CHARACTERS = "!@#$%&*()_-+=[]{}\\|:/?.,><"; // Note the double \ as escape private static String createPassword() { SecureRandom random = new SecureRandom(); StringBuilder password = new StringBuilder(); ...


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After username and password verification Process to send OTP SMS and verify: Generate 4 or 6 digit random number to send as OTP. Get code to send random number to customer / user's mobile number. Get SMS API Key and Messaging account with Spring Edge SMS gateway. Integrate SEND SMS API code in website to Send OTP sms. Get input from user and compare with ...


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Benefits of using Configuration (app.config or web.config) You can enforce security to configurations You configure connection string or other settings based on the environments using configuration transformations like (Web.QA.Config, Web.Production.Config etc) - Visit http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/vstudio/dd465318(v=vs.100).aspx


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Establishing a connection in your program itself may not create problems for your application, but as a convention it is a good practise to initiate your connections using ConfigurationManager in code and establish connections to databases in .config file. Moreover security can be provided to a .config file.


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If someone get a hold on your executable he can reverse engineer the password and user name. If you store it in app.config it is even easier. Best way when you deal with SQL SERVER is windows authentication (if possible) If you deal with mysql/oracle or if windows authentication is not an option, you should find a way to mask these name/password (you can ...


3

For best flexibility you should store connection strings in Configuration file App.config of Web.config. There is a special section ConnectionStrings which holds key-value pairs of connection strings. Security information stored in code can be compromised with code disassembling. Configuration files can be encrypted. Walkthrough: Encrypting Configuration ...


0

You should make use of a global (and "static") function to avoid giving access to other unwanted/private variables (i.e. a sub-function has access to all the variables of the parent function). Second you want to remove a few keywords from the string to be evaluated to avoid problems as described by duskwuff and Alex K. Something like this: function exec(e) ...


0

As we commit our vendor (not a good practice but we've been asked to do this) I have deleted this log which was useless.


4

If the shadowed variables were deleted ... alert([1, window, document]); var obj = { document: true, window: true }; with (obj) { alert([2, window, document]); delete window; delete document; alert([3, window, document]); //restored } Additionally if you exposed any DOM elements the document/window objects could ...


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No, this is not secure. No matter what you do with your code's execution environment using with, it is still possible to retrieve the "real" global object using the following trick: var window = (function(){ return this }).call(undefined); This works because Function.call will use the global object as the value of this if it is explicitly passed as ...


0

Securing an app with only hardcoded credentials is as allready mentioned not safe. I should suggest you use some login like structure. Where you first of all ask for username/password. Then you build upp a API call using a signature you compile at run time. By doing this you never need to send the users password over the open web. You can achieve this ...


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If you check for integer, then if(is_numeric($_GET['user_input']) && $_GET['user_input'] > 0) { //your code }


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$i = intval($_GET['user_input']); if ( $i != 0) { // do stuff with $i } check it's documentation here


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So if your only question is if it's in any case a int, then is the answer : Yes But if the cast to int fails (e.g. input: 'a') $i is just 0 Example: Input/ Output: 4 -> 4 -5 -> -5 "14" -> 15 "a" -> 0 "!" -> 0 array() -> 0 Side Note: If the value is an array trim fails and you get an error


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Check this if(stripslashes(trim($_GET['user_input']))) > 0){ //your code Here }


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The only way to configure a namespace is by doing so in Cognos Configuration, whose settings get saved in the cogstartup.xml file in configuration — it cannot be done from Cognos Connection. For a very long time I believed that editing the configuration files was unsupported, and IBM even has technotes that recommend not to do that but instead do it on a ...


1

Apparently despite the fact that the method takes a password parameter, the AndroidKeystore implementation does not support this, take a look at line 200 in the source. In any case, a password, whether strong or weak that is stored anywhere on the device is unsafe. This is especially true of source code (including source code in general, non-android ...


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There is/was a pretty coordinated hack based on this same principle. We now check all plugins and add-ons before installing. http://blog.fox-it.com/2014/11/18/cryptophp-analysis-of-a-hidden-threat-inside-popular-content-management-systems/ https://foxitsecurity.files.wordpress.com/2014/11/cryptophp-whitepaper-foxsrt-v4.pdf We weren't affected, but I ...


6

Suppose I create an Assembly program that directly accesses hard drive data and changes the bytes of a file. How could file permissions possibly prevent me from doing this? If you write in assembly, your assembly is still run in a CPU mode that prevents direct access to memory and devices. CPU modes … place restrictions on the type and scope ...


0

Try to modify manifest, adding your server name into caller-allowable-codebase. Probably you don't need to add your site url into exception anymore


0

As a concrete example, suppose your page has a button that only administrators are supposed to be able to see and click: <asp:Button runat="server" ID="resetButton" Text="Reset" OnClick="resetButton_Click" /> Inside an if (!IsPostBack) block in the code-behind, you hide the button if the user isn't an admin: protected override void OnInit(EventArgs ...


0

The problem is undoubtedly the treatment of ciphertext as encoded characters, as shown by id.getBytes() in Spring / MFC. As not all byte values are valid character encodings you may lose data. In general you should define a character encoding for your plaintext and a binary encoding (such as base 64) for your ciphertext.


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Thanks lot M.Deinum As per your advise, I have moved the detection of the bean in the root context by updating web.xml. It is working now. <context-param> <param-name>contextConfigLocation</param-name> <param-value>WEB-INF/spring-servlet.xml, WEB-INF/eimsgo-security.xml</param-value> </context-param> ...


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If you use HTTPS, the communication would be encrypted and no ne should be able to sniff the Token on your network.


0

Here it is an url where they explain how to solve your problem http://www.jade-cheng.com/uh/ta/signed-applet-tutorial/


0

Have a look at this library if you want to do encryption from JavaScript: https://code.google.com/p/crypto-js/ Calculating a SHA256 hash is as simple as: <script src="http://crypto-js.googlecode.com/svn/tags/3.1.2/build/rollups/sha256.js"></script> <script> var hash = CryptoJS.SHA256("Message"); </script> For using digital ...


0

Eventually, I solved it by adding the Worksheet_BeforeDoubleClick event. When they double click on a non empty cell, they are prompted if they want to unlock the sheet. If they click yes, they have to enter the password and then have access to the cells input. To set this up, you must block all cells that may not be changed without password (cells with ...


1

SQL query with key in it (as Wesley Murch suggests) is not a good idea. If you do: update mytable set myfield = AES_ENCRYPT('some value', 'your secure secret key'); ... and the query gets logged (slowlog for inst.) your secure secret key is captured in plain text, which should never happen. Such a query with the secret key would be also visible when you ...


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Check out Dead Simple HTML Sanitizer on CodeProject http://www.codeproject.com/Tips/529712/Dead-Simple-HTML-Sanitizer


1

On a non-rooted device, applications are sandboxed at the process and filesystem level. Each app gets its own filesystem space that only it can access. An application can choose to make a file world read/write, but by default they are not. However, as noted in some of the comments and your original post, if a device is rooted then the attacker can access ...


1

Is it possible to get the device rooted (in this scenario) and then get that file? Yes, assuming: the hacker can brute-force the password, and the device is rootable in general (not every device has a known recipe for gaining root) Can the hacker physically take out the flash chip from the device and then he analyzes it using any tool. In ...


0

It would be helpful if you could add logs. Judging by the error "403", it seems to me that there is something wrong with your role query. Maybe, your login module doesn't assign "admin" role to your user. One thing you could do is implement a custom authentication mechanism http://undertow.io/documentation/servlet/security.html (copy form authentication ...


0

I suggest you to try with Basic Authentication. I believe Rest services are mutual contract between the consumer and provider, so re design your service to access the basic auth header. Your client need to pass the base64 encoded value of username:password, Your service should get the header value and decode you will get the original data back, Check against ...


0

I am using spring and spring security since 1 and half year with spring security to develop rest API I use below technique for user authentication Follow below steps Allow to access http:// localhost:8080/login for all user User will pass username and password in body Authenticate user with database entry create access token and send back to response using ...


0

Faced similar issue. Resolved by removing Temporary Internet Files from Control Panel -> Java


2

Security is a cross cutting concern (like logging, validation, caching and so on) and since of this you don't code this in the domain model. The application layer should allow only an authorized call to reach the domain layer. Usually, security at the gate is the preffered approach. This means that you apply security as top as you can in the call stack ...


0

Thanks for your help The proper path is C:\Users\Your_Account_Name\AppData\LocalLow\Sun\Java\Deployment\deployment.properties enter at the last line deployment.security.level=MEDIUM restart the browser and good to go


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Fortunately I was pointed in the correct direction by the comments - it was actually two different problems at the same time. The post action was being handled by my login controller, not spring security. So, I deleted the post method. Additionally, the post was not being called correctly or passed the correct parameters - so I changed the action to ...


1

I'm not taking half of a tenth of the security measures you take, but I take one you don't mention. You seem not to use SSL, so your id/password pass through the tubes in a readable state at login time. This means they can be listened to (no idea how, I couldn't do it myself, but they actually can be). A little and easy trick I use against that: - my login ...


0

Use url-rewrite. Create a url-rewrite config file and put it into your web application's WEB-INF/classes directory Add a rule that adds that header to all requests Note that this is not HSTS-specific: you can do anything you want with url-rewrite.


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In order to get windows credentials out of your wcf webservice, your binding has to be a wsHttpBinding: <wsHttpBinding> <binding name="wsHttpBinding_MyService"> <security mode="TransportCredentialOnly" /> </binding> </wsHttpBinding> This is an example of a working security that ...


3

The WCF client throws the "The provided URI scheme 'http' is invalid; expected 'https' " error because the basicHttpBinding specifies security mode="Transport"> but the endpoint address currently indicates a non-secure protocol (endpoint address="http://localhost:57165/MyService.svc". Update the endpoint address to match the binding's security to resolve ...



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