Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

This awk should work with a custom field separator: awk -F'[^[]*\\[|\\][^]]*' '{split($(NF-1), a, " "); print a[1], a[2]}' file eight nine los angeles yes no


0

sed -ne 's/^.*\[\([^ ]* [^ ]*\)[^]]*\][^][]*$/\1/p' That is: replace the entire line up through a set of square brackets that don't have any square brakcets after them with the first two groups of nonspaces inside the brackets and the space between them. ^ start of line .* any number of characters, including 0; exact match will be determined by what can ...


0

use strict; use warnings; use 5.016; say "0123456789" x 6; my $line = "Dec 28, 2014 01:20:08.555824000 160 64.8.23.171 08:0c:29:af:7g:a8"; say $line; say unpack('A6 @12 A9 @31 A*', $line); --output:-- 012345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890123456789 Dec 28, 2014 01:20:08.555824000 160 64.8.23.171 08:0c:29:af:7g:a8 Dec 28 01:20:08 160 ...


0

sed 's/\, [0-9]* \([0-9:]*\)\.[0-9]*/ \1/' In words: find the comma, match the year, match the HH:MM:SS, find the period, match the nanoseconds. Keep only a space and the HH:MM:SS.


0

data.txt: Dec 28, 2014 01:20:08.555824000 160 64.8.23.171 08:0c:29:af:7g:a8 Dec 28, 2014 01:20:08.555824000 160 64.8.23.171 08:0c:29:af:7g:a8 Dec 28, 2014 01:20:08.555824000 160 64.8.23.171 08:0c:29:af:7g:a8 command: awk '{gsub(",","",$2); gsub("\\.+[0-9]*","",$4); print($1, $2, $4, $5, $6, $7)}' data.txt > result.txt result.txt: Dec 28 01:20:08 ...


0

You just want to remove the third and fourth column, and the comma in the second column. You could just use the unix command: cut -d ' ' -f 1-2,5-8 | sed 's/,//' example: $> echo 'Dec 28, 2014 01:20:08.555824000 160 64.8.23.171 08:0c:29:af:7g:a8' | cut -d ' ' -f 1-2,5-8 | sed 's/,//' output: Dec 28 160 64.8.23.171 08:0c:29:af:7g:a8 It will do ...


0

You could do: awk -F"[ ,]" '{split($5,a,".");print $1,$2,a[1],$6,$7,$8}' file Dec 28 01:20:08 160 64.8.23.171 08:0c:29:af:7g:a8


0

sed -e "s/,*\([^,]*\).*/\1/" should find the first, and sed -e "s/\(,*\([^,][^,]*\)\)*,*/\2/" should find the last.


1

Perl is good for this task perl -F, -lane '@G = grep {$_ ne ""} @F; print $G[0]' file The grep command filters out empty fields. To print the last field, change $G[0] to $G[-1] With sed: sed 's/^,*//; s/,.*//' file # first field sed 's/,*$//; s/.*,//' file # last field


0

From this data: cat file ,,,,,VALUE1,,,,,VALUE2,,,, ,,VALUE3,,,VALUE4,,,VALUE5, ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, ,,,,,,,VALUE6,,,,VALUE7,, ,,,,,,,,VALUE8,,,,,, First occurrence: tr ',' ' ' <file | awk '{print $1}' VALUE1 VALUE3 VALUE6 VALUE8 Last: tr ',' ' ' <file | awk '{print $NF}' VALUE2 VALUE5 VALUE7 VALUE8


0

if you wanr (empty) as part of the output. first: sed ' s/,*\([^,]\+\).*/\1/; s/^,*$/(empty)/; ' last: sed ' s/\(^\|.*,\)\([^,]\+\),*/\2/; s/^,*$/(empty)/; '


3

Using awk with custom field separator: First non-empty field: awk -F ',+' '{print $2}' file VALUE1 VALUE3 VALUE6 VALUE8 Last non-empty field: awk -F ',+' '{print $(NF-1)}' file VALUE2 VALUE5 VALUE7 VALUE8 Regex pattern ',+' will make 1 or more commas as a field separator.


1

awk -v FIELDWIDTHS="9 8 8 12 13 6 10" 'NR%2{temp=$0;next;} {$0=temp$0; gsub(/ /,""); print $1,$2,$3,$4,$5,$6,$7}' OFS=',' file Input file: 4002000W1ABCDABCD7821 123456702291LSN1230 16300000000009164 000409164 4002000W1ABCDABCD7821 123456702291LSN1230 16300000000009164 000409164 4002000W1ABCDABCD7821 123456702291LSN1230 16300000000009164 000409164 ...


0

Here is a Perl solution: use strict; use warnings; my @fmt = (9, 8, 8, 12, 13, 6, 10); my @head = qw(ABC_ID def_sc sde_hd mln_hfg ghi_jkl ijk_klm pqr_xyz); my $rec_len = do { my $sum; for(@fmt) { $sum += $_ }; $sum }; my $fn = 'file'; open(my $fh, '<', $fn) or die "Could not open file '$fn': $!\n"; my $str = do {local $/ = undef; <$fh>}; ...


1

With GNU sed: sed -i '/if .* {/,/}/d' file


2

Using standard unix tools here is an awk version: awk -v ip='aa.bb.cc.dd' '{for (i=1; i<=NF; i++) if ($i != "127.0.0.1" && $i ~ /\<[0-9]{1,3}(\.[0-9]{1,3}){3}\>/) $i=ip} 1' file 127.0.0.1 aa.bb.cc.dd aa.bb.cc.dd 127.0.0.1 aa.bb.cc.dd 127.0.0.1 cat file 127.0.0.1 192.152.30.1 158.30.254.1 127.0.0.1 158.40.253.10 127.0.0.1


2

Assuming you have something like this in your file my_file 127.0.0.1 192.152.30.1 158.30.254.1 127.0.0.1 158.40.253.10 127.0.0.1 You can try the command line below sed -r 's/127.0.0.1/########/g;s/[0-9]{1,3}[.][0-9]{1,3}[.][0-9]{1,3}[.][0-9]{1,3}/MY_NEW_IP/g;s/########/127.0.0.1/g' my-file I am assuming you have nothing like ######## in your file take ...


1

It's not entirely clear what you want but GNU awk for FIELDWIDTHS and multi-char RS is one option: $ awk -v RS='^$' -v FIELDWIDTHS="9 8 8 8" -v OFS=', ' '{gsub(/\n/,""); print $1, $2, $3, $4}' file 4002000W1, ABCDABCD, 78211234, 56789071


5

Since sed won't support negative lookahead assertion, i suggest you to use Perl instead of sed. perl -pe 's/\b(?:(?!127\.0\.0\.1)\d{1,3}(?:\.\d{1,3}){3})\b/'"$ip"'/g' file Example: $ cat file 122.54.23.121 127.0.0.1 125.54.23.125 $ ip="101.155.155.155" $ perl -pe 's/\b(?:(?!127\.0\.0\.1)\d{1,3}(?:\.\d{1,3}){3})\b/'"$ip"'/g' file 101.155.155.155 127.0.0.1 ...


1

Working from the comments, it appears that if the input was (file data.in): name='main[sub][subsub][least]' value='abs.nom.value' name='MainCategory[ChildCategory][GrandchildCategory][GeatGrandchildCategory]' value='Diddly:Squat' Then the desired output is (file data.out): name='main[sub][subsub][least]' value='main.sub.subsub.least' ...


0

find ./ -type f -exec sed -r -i.bak -e '/value='ANOTHER-COMPLEX-REGEX'/s/(\]\[|\]|\[)/./g' -e '/name='COMPLEX-REGEX'/s/(\]\[|\]|\[)/./g' {} \; -i.bak make a backup of the original file with an extension .bak COMPLEX-REGEX and ANOTHER-COMPLEX-REGEX - I am assuming these expression have the your square bracketed values.


0

Use basic sed like below. sed 's/^\([^ ]*\) \(.*\)$/\2/;s/^\[\|\]$//g;s/\(\[\|\]\)\+/./g' Example: $ echo 'foo MainCategory[ChildCategory][GrandchildCategory][GeatGrandchildCategory]' | sed 's/^\([^ ]*\) \(.*\)$/\2/;s/^\[\|\]$//g;s/\(\[\|\]\)\+/./g' MainCategory.ChildCategory.GrandchildCategory.GeatGrandchildCategory


0

sed accepts multiple expressions in the same call, just chain them with the -e option : sed -i -r -e "s/name='(COMPLEX-REGEX)' value='ANOTHER-COMPLEX-REGEX'/name='\1'/g" -e "s/[][]/\./g"


0

This command below will match all lines with with </Engine> only and put a line of text above it sed '\#^</Engine>$#i\<put_your_text_here>' <put_your_text_here> is the text you will put above this line Note also I used "#" as sed's delimiter since your string has / to avoid conflict EDIT if the tag have spaces before and after ...


1

I found the answer to my own question. sed -n '/<\/Engine>/ =' gives me the correct line number. So I can use this pattern in my script now.


0

Try this one. sed 's/^\(xyzFunction (){\)$/#ifndef COMMENT_OUT\n\1/; s/}$/}\n#endif/' file name Or try this, sed 's/\(.*(.*){\)/#ifndef COMMENT_OUT\n\1/; s/}$/}\n#endif/' file name


-1

Use this sed command sed '/xyzFunction (){/s/.*/#ifndef COMMENT_OUT\n&/;/}/s/.*/&\n#endif/' or sed '/runTaskCode(.*)/s/.*/#ifndef COMMENT_OUT\n&/;/}/s/.*/&\n#endif/' Explanation : First match the function name /runTaskCode(.*)/ ,If function name has matched then put your string in previous line like s/.*/#ifndef ...


0

This can also work sed '/VDD/s/^./*&/' my_file find all lines with VDD. take the first character in these lines and add * in behind it


2

awk '$0=/VDD/?"*"$0:$0' if line contains VDD, prepend * else just print line as is


1

[^] is an invalid expression. I don't know why your version of sed accepts it, but in POSIX sed ^ at the beginning of a list inverts it. That is to say, [^abc] matches all characters except a, b, and c. Furthermore, to match a ] in a list, it has to appear right after the opening [ or the inverting ^. []abc] matches a, b, c, and ], whereas [^]abc] matches ...


1

Try this: awk '/VDD/ {$0="*"$0}1' file


4

Try doing this : sed '/VDD/s/^/*/' file


1

$ awk -F'" *= *' 'c[$1]++{sub(FS," "c[$1]"&")}1' file "Battleplate of the Prehistoric Marauder" = 99047, "Battleplate of the Prehistoric Marauder 2" = 99197, "Battleplate of the Prehistoric Marauder 3" = 99411, "Battleplate of the Prehistoric Marauder 4" = 99603, "Battlescar Boots" = 28747,


0

grep ^[^#] filename ^ - begin of line [^#]- exclude all except # but whitespace. If you have spaces in the begin of line it won't work.


0

If you do not like to use regex, you can use this awk: echo "bugfix/ABC-12345-1-00" | awk -F\/ '{print $NF}' ABC-12345-1-00 Or just this: awk -F\/ '$0=$NF'


0

Here is an awk version: awk -F\" '{a[$2]++} {if (a[$2]-1) $0=FS$2" "a[$2]FS$3}1' file "Battleplate of the Prehistoric Marauder" = 99047, "Battleplate of the Prehistoric Marauder 2" = 99197, "Battleplate of the Prehistoric Marauder 3" = 99411, "Battleplate of the Prehistoric Marauder 4" = 99603, "Battlescar Boots" = 28747, The duplicate does not need to be ...


1

Using perl from command line, perl -pe 's/"(.+)\K(?=")/( map $_ ? " $_" : "", $h{$1}++ )[0]/e' file


0

Here is a Perl solution: use strict; use warnings; use Text::Balanced qw(extract_delimited); my $fn = 'File'; my %h; open (my $fh, "<", $fn) or die "Could not open file '$fn': $!\n"; while (<$fh>) { my ($title, $remainder) = extract_delimited($_, '"', '[^"]*'); if ($h{$title}++) { $title = modify_title($title, $h{$title}); } ...


1

This is how to do it in bash. Reads form stdin, writes to stdout #!/bin/bash declare -A known # an associative array while read line do eval set $line string="$1" number="$3" i="${known["$string"]}" if test -z "$i" then known["$string"]=0 else let ++i known["$string"]=$i string="$string $i" fi echo ...


1

You could try the below sed command. $ tail -n 3 /www/wget.log | sed 's/ \..*\.\( \|$\)/ => /g' 1500K => 5% 105K 4m17s 1550K => 6% 63.0K 4m21s 1600K =>


2

You can use: tail -n 3 /www/wget.log | sed -r 's/(\.+ *)+/=> /' 1500K => 5% 105K 4m17s 1550K => 6% 63=> 0K 4m21s 1600K => On OSX use: tail -n 3 /www/wget.log | sed -E 's/(\.+ *)+/=> /'


0

Taken from https://www.freebsd.org/cgi/man.cgi?query=sed Multibyte characters containing a byte with value 0x5C (ASCII `\') may be incorrectly treated as line continuation characters in arguments to the ``a'', ``c'' and ``i'' commands. Multibyte characters cannot be used as delimiters with the ``s'' and ``y'' commands. You double quote ...


0

The backslash will escape the newline character so sed sees it all as one single long line. Use double backslash at the end of the lines to avoid this. Then you can use a single backslash to escape the leading whitespace. sed "/hostsection/ a\\ \\ \ server {\\ \ listen 80;\\ \ server_name $1 www.$1;\\ ...


3

If your grep supports -P then you could use the below grep commands. $ echo 'bugfix/ABC-12345-1-00' | grep -oP '/\K[A-Z]+-\d+' ABC-12345 \K keeps the text matched so far out of the overall regex match. $ echo 'bugfix/ABC-12345-1-00' | grep -oP '(?<=/)[A-Z]+-\d+' ABC-12345 (?<=/) Positive lookbehind which asserts that the match must be preceded ...


0

You could try something like: echo "bugfix/ABC-12345-1-00" | egrep -o '[A-Z]+-[0-9]+' OUTPUT: ABC-12345


2

echo "bugfix/ABC-12345-1-00"| perl -ane '/.*?([A-Z]+\-[0-9]+).*/;print $1."\n"'


1

You could try the below sed command. -n and p helps to print those lines where the replacement takesplace. [[:space:]]* POSIX notation which matches zero or more spaces. sed -n 's/^MODIFIED[[:space:]]*//p' some_file OR sed -n 's/^MODIFIED\s*//p' some_file Example: $ cat ri MODIFIED foo bar apple mango $ cat ri | sed -n '/^MODIFIED/p' | sed ...


0

Here is an awk version: awk 'gsub(/^MODIFIED\s*/,"")' file Example: cat file test MODIFIED data more MODIFIED home awk 'gsub(/^MODIFIED\s*/,"")' file data


0

You can remove both cat and sed, just use last sed like: sed -nr 's/^MODIFIED\s*//p' some_file


2

Use the -o flag: grep -o 'XXX:.*' <input >output



Top 50 recent answers are included