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If I correctly understand your idea about "all trusting", which is hostname verifier in your code, you can refer to the following: Let's assume your server app is hosting inside IIS which has a server certificate in which "Issued to" is "localhost", for example. Then, inside verify method you can verify "localhost". HostnameVerifier hostnameVerifier = ...


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Are you doing cross-domain Ajax calls? If yes; then you really can't do anything. Browser itself blocks that cross origin calls with invalid SSL certificate. Also you can try importing this Self signed certificate in to trusted root by following below URL: How To Import a Trusted Root Certification


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Let's assume your server app is hosting inside IIS which has a server certificate in which "Issued to" is "localhost", for example. Then, inside verify method you can verify "localhost". HostnameVerifier hostnameVerifier = new HostnameVerifier() { @Override public boolean verify(String hostname, SSLSession session) { HostnameVerifier hv = ...


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The distinction here is not really "self-signed" vs "signed." The correct distinction is "commercial" vs. "internal." Commercial certificate vendors are selling you exactly one thing: they have a certificate in the root store of major browsers and operating systems. There is no technical difference between a certificate that Verisign signs and one that you ...


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You didn't say what platform you are using, but for Windows I would recommend Active Directory Certificate Services: https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/windowsserver/dd448615.aspx


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openssl s_client -connect {HOSTNAME}:{PORT} </dev/null 2>/dev/null|openssl x509 -outform PEM >mycertfile.pem ...explained here.


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I got to know the reason behind it. Seems chrome confirmed this issue from their end for version 44. It is already reported 2 weeks ago and fixed by chrome in 45 version. https://code.google.com/p/chromium/issues/detail?id=513903 https://code.google.com/p/chromium/issues/detail?id=473390


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This worked for me. See: http://www.robpeck.com/2010/10/google-chrome-mac-os-x-and-self-signed-ssl-certificates/#.Vcy8_ZNVhBc In the address bar, click the little lock with the X. This will bring up a small information screen. Click the button that says "Certificate Information." Click and drag the image to your desktop. It looks like a little certificate. ...


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I confused the root and the leaf. My bad.


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NOT FOR PROD Simply paste this in your chrome: chrome://flags/#allow-insecure-localhost You should see highlighted text saying: Allow invalid certificates for resources loaded from localhost Click Enable.


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Isn't it super easy with this tool.. http://blog.pluralsight.com/selfcert-create-a-self-signed-certificate-interactively-gui-or-programmatically-in-net


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This is something that keeps coming up - especially for Google Chrome on Mac OS X Yosemite! Thankfully, one of our development team sent me this link today, and the method works reliably, whilst still allowing you to control for which sites you accept certificates. ...


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If you're developing, and you're developing with a Windows server, simply add localhost as a Trusted Site. And yes, per DarrylGriffiths' comment, although it may look like you're adding an Internet Explorer setting... I believe those are Windows rather than IE settings. Although MS tend to assume that they're only IE (hence the alert next to "Enable ...


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Sometimes Google Chrome throws this error, even if it should not. I experienced it when Chrome had a new version, and it needed to be restarted. After restarting the same page worked without any errors. The error in the console was: net::ERR_INSECURE_RESPONSE



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