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See this question for some example code in Java The general idea is that Philosopher[n] shares chopsticks with Philosopher[n-1] and Philosopher[n+1] - Philosopher[n]'s left-hand chopstick is the same as Philosopher[n-1]'s right-hand chopstick, and Philosopher[n]'s right-hand chopstick is the same as Philosopher[n+1]'s left-hand chopstick ("left" and "right" ...


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The pseudocode doesn't have proper mutual exclusion. Consider P1 executing first: Since initially in2=false, P1 gets over its entry protocol and enters the critical section. If P2 executes then, since still in1=false, P2 gets over its entry protocol and enters the critical section, too, thus no mutual exclusion. Regarding indefinite postponement: After ...


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As many people pointed out here, is true that the animation runs on the main thread and the semaphore usage stops the main thread. But this still can be done with a semaphore using this approach: // create semaphore dispatch_semaphore_t semaphore = dispatch_semaphore_create(0); [UIView animateWithDuration:0.3 delay:0 ...


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First, you don't need to repeatedly call [fileHandle waitForDataInBackgroundAndNotify];. Probably not the source of your problem... Secondly, in cases like these, it is almost always because of buffering issues. But you've addressed that. The second most common cause is that the task isn't terminating. Are you sure the python scripts are actually ...


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First things first. Depending upon implementation, Single or Multiple source file(s), .c in your case can constitute to a single executable. A single executable runs a process. If the source has a fork() done in the code, then the child process is created. So, your ...interprocess communication between different .c files need not be necessarily two ...


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Have a look at java.util.concurrent.Phaser A reusable synchronization barrier, similar in functionality to CyclicBarrier and CountDownLatch but supporting more flexible usage. Unlike the case for other barriers, the number of parties registered to synchronize on a phaser may vary over time. Tasks may be registered at any time . . . and optionally ...


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The problem with your code is that your Customer Thread runs infinite loop and immediately tries to acquire the semaphore after release (Another way to do is that Customer Thread should do its business and terminate). The 6th Thread is actually waiting for its turn but likelihood to acquire permit is less since first 5 threads are active. To check this you ...


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Try adding true as the second parameter on the Semphore constructor call. By default, there is no attempt at fairness, which you need to get all renters taking turns. Generally, a renter that has just returned a movie will get to the acquire call faster than one that was waiting for the semaphore. With the added true argument "this semaphore will guarantee ...


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Your expectation is wrong. Your program does not include any synchronisation to make the t1 thread execute before the t2 thread (or vice-versa), so either ordering is possible. In the case where t2 acquires the semaphore first, buf will still be an empty string and that is what will print. What you need is for t2 to wait until t1 has filled the buffer. ...


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Yes, if you have initialized semaphore to N, then sem_wait will not block any thread unless it has already been called N times, then only semaphore becomes -ve and that's when any thread calling sem_wait blocks. for critical section you have to use binary semaphores or mutex.


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You can use std::thread::join(). http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/thread/thread/join Edit: If you do not want to wait for the thread to finish, you may be looking for std::condition_variable. http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/thread/condition_variable Please note that you still have to call detach or join on the thread before it is destroyed. Edit 2: I ...


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ok, time should be relative and not absolote. tm = time(NULL); timeSpec.tv_sec = tm+10; timeSpec.tv_nsec = 0; rc = sem_timedwait(pSemId,&timeSpec); It solve the problem.


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You are correct that polling is an inefficient approach. This mutex lock implementation only makes it worse. You ask if a semaphore might be better pattern: It probably is, but I suspect you can do even better. Specifically, three asynchronous patterns come to mind: The "completion handler" pattern, where the API call takes a block parameter which is a ...


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Just hide posts that have expired based on the current time. For example WHERE ExpiryDateTime > SYSUTCDATE() Then you can clean old posts in the background at any frequency you like. Create a Windows Task Scheduler task that calls a special URL of your website. That URL should perform a database cleanup. This is a very simple and clearly correct ...


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Neither. A semaphore is a way of controlling resource use between multiple threads An SQL job is a somewhat blunt tool designed to allow db admins to schedule tasks I would create a separate program 'oldDataDeleter' code up your logic about what you want to delete or archive after how much time and then apply that logic in an atomic way. I would run this ...


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Although your problem can be solved by the 'join' feature of threads which can force the completion of one thread before starting the next asi (as seen in) the Elyasian example but still one must add that you are on the right track in terms of the Semaphore route undertaken. Semaphore s = new Semaphore(1, true); In this statement the second parameter set ...


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I would like to know how can i make those threads work one after the other, and how to make the first one always run after the second one. I created a semaphore, but i not sure about how to use it. You could use join() in your case if you want thread to finish before calling thread c2. Like so (the threads are called in thread of main): ...


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You can model the permit in the Semaphore to mean: "allowed to run". Since you want the first thread to be allowed to run automatically, you can't use acquire for the first thread, because it would compete with the second thread for the permit. So the first thread starts, assuming that it has the permit. When the first thread has completed, it release-es ...


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See this Paper On Variations of Peterson's Mutual Exclusion Algorithm Abstract In 1981 the most concise version presented for two concurrent processes was Peterson's Algorithm. Peterson used the OR operator in the decision control. Tanenbaum uses a claimed version of Peterson's Algorithm that uses the AND operator in the decision ...


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The working option in Ubuntu is -lpthread. But if you work on suse or other systems the correct option is -lrt. Also the book Linux Programmin Interface mentions -lrt as the correct option.


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Some structures are needed for the semaphores and process creation. The no warnings define is to prevent warnings for using sscanf or sprintf. abCmdLine has the name of process B (pb.exe) and the value for the shared memory handle. (note - handles are pointer types). There's a 1/2 second sleep in the loops so you can see how this works. In this example, both ...


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Assuming you want the processes to alternate, then you will need two semaphores and each process will need code with a slightly different sequence of calls: Process A: SemA = CreateAndInitializeSemaphore(); SemB = CreateAndInitializeSemaphore(); for (i = 0; i < Numpoints; i++) { WaitForSemaphore(SemA); …code for process A… ...


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You should be using t[0] and t[1] in main(): an array of size N has valid indexes in 0..N-1, so, first, fix that. Here's the correct code: pthread_create(&t[0], NULL, front_to_back, (void *) &SIZE ); pthread_create(&t[1], NULL, back_to_front, (void *) &SIZE ); pthread_join(t[0],NULL); pthread_join(t[1],NULL); Ideally, you should also ...


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I tend to call this pattern the "GatedBatchWriter", i.e. the first thread through the gate handles a batch of tasks; its own and a number of others on behalf of other writers, until it has done enough work. This pattern is primarily useful, when it is more efficient to batch work, because of overheads associated with that work. E.g. writing larger blocks ...


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Solution is based on C++11 critical code section aka mutex. Here's the working code, followed by an explanation. Tested and working on VS2013: using namespace std; #include <iostream> #include <string> #include <thread> #include <mutex> std::mutex mtx; void oddAndEven(int n, int end); int main() { std::thread odd(oddAndEven, 1, ...


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The binary semaphore would be used to protect some resource, so that only one process may access it at a time. This process would do a wait, which, assuming the semaphore is 1 (resource isn't already busy) would make the semaphore =0. When that process is finished with the resource it would signal, allowing other processes access to the resource, making ...


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I believe that the release function (signal in mine) should tell the waiting thread to run instead of letting next thread busy-wait. I haven't programmed in C++ before but something like this might be what they had in mind. The thread-support is usually included from the OS though... I'm therefore not sure if it is a primative. pseudo code: ...


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There are two things going wrong here as far as i can see. for(int row=0; row<size; row++){ for(int col=0; col<size;col++){ for(int i=0;i<size;i++){ myThread[i] = thread(MatrixMultiplication, matrixA, matrixB, matrixC, row, col, i); myThread[i].join(); } } } Should be ...


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Well, I solved it myself. The reason is that I used CreateSemaphore again after creating the thread, making the player thread visiting different semaphores as the monitor thread... Sorry for my stupidness, and thank you for telling me so much!


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If I understood your needs, you should probably have something like this.. HANDLE hPlayersReady[4]; HANDLE hAllPlayed; Create these 5 events, and then on your monitor thread, do something like this... while(true) { // Wait for all players to move WaitForMultipleObjects(4, &hPlayersReady, true, INFINITE); // Process move ... // Advise players the move ...


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There is very little that you can say about the order of statements. You have the order X / wait / Y. You have the order A / signal / B. And you have the order signal / Y. That's all. If you are not interested in the wait / signal which are just tools, then Y executes after A and that is all you know. P2 can run completely to its end before the first ...


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Because the processes run in parallel, the order of X and A cannot be determined - we could denote that as (X | A) - meaning that either of those is executed. Now, for the semaphore: due to the processes being parallel, the order of actions is again (wait (consyn) | signal (consyn), where different outcomes If wait (consyn) is executed first and signal ...


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Looking at the docs here, it says: Be sure to call quit() to end the loop. ;)


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Check out this paper: https://birrell.org/andrew/papers/ImplementingCVs.pdf TL;DR: Use an explicit queue.


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- (BOOL)isAppConnected { __block BOOL isConnected = NO; dispatch_semaphore_t semaphore = dispatch_semaphore_create(0); // Add this code... dispatch_async(dispatch_get_global_queue(DISPATCH_QUEUE_PRIORITY_DEFAULT, 0), ^{ [[SFRestAPI sharedInstance] performSOQLQuery:@"SELECT id FROM Account LIMIT 1" ...


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There's http://sysvipc.rubyforge.org/SysVIPC.html which gives you SysV semaphores. Ruby is perfect for eliminating the API blemishes of SysV semaphores and SysV semaphores are the best around -- they are interprocess semaphores, you can use SEM_UNDO so that even SIGKILLs won't mess up your global state (POSIX interprocess semaphores don't have this), and you ...


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In addition to bvamos's answer, according to the documentation the use of sem is deprecated : NAME ipcrm - remove a message queue, semaphore set or shared memory id SYNOPSIS ipcrm [ -M key | -m id | -Q key | -q id | -S key | -s id ] ... deprecated usage ipcrm [ shm | msg | sem ] id ... remove shared memory us ipcrm -m to remove a shared ...


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Semaphores should not be used in the place of synchronized because semaphores does not hold exclusive mutual lock even if it is initialized to one, like synchronized on some object. It is true that the semaphore initialized to one, allows only one thread at a time to access the object, which holds the permit. But the thread which holds the permit does not ...


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From API doc of Semaphore: Memory consistency effects: Actions in a thread prior to calling a "release" method such as release() happen-before actions following a successful "acquire" method such as acquire() in another thread. So it is safe to read/write variables that are guarded by a semaphore.


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I wonder if when I'm using Semaphores it is necessary to define the variable as volatile, I dont think there is any such restriction. A mutex is a mutual exclusion semaphore, a special variant of a semaphore that only allows one locker at a time. It's equivalent to a normal counting semaphore with a count of one and the requirement that it can only be ...


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I finally found the solution I was looking for that would allow me to launch (Start()) all of my Task objects, run them through a semaphoreslim, observe a CancellationToken, and then detect if the Task was cancelled or had completed normally. In this case a Task would only "complete normally" if it had entered the semaphore and begun processing before the ...


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Using a cancellation token: using System; using System.Threading; using System.Threading.Tasks; class Program { static void Main() { var tokenSource2 = new CancellationTokenSource(); CancellationToken ct = tokenSource2.Token; var task = Task.Factory.StartNew(() => { // Were we already canceled? ...


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Release the semaphore in the finally block so that it is always properly released. No need to detect cancellation. Also, side-effects buried in log messages are not good style: LogtoStatusText("..." + ASemaphore.Release()); I only found this through text search. Would have never noticed the mistake otherwise.


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Of course, if threads are arbitrarily acquiring or releasing a semaphore, the result would be disastrous and the fact, that implementations do not prevent this, does not imply that this is a useful scenario. However, there might be real use cases if the involved threads use another mechanism to coordinate themselves while using the semaphore to hold these ...


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You can use if(sema.acquire(block=False)): # Do something with lock taken sema.release() else: # Do something in case when lock is taken by other Such mechanism is useful for avoiding deadlocks in complex cases, but also may be used for other purposes.


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Semaphores are designed around the idea, that threads just grab one, and wait until it becomes available, because it's not really predictable in which order they wil be acquired. The counter is not part of the abstraction called 'Semaphore'. It is not guaranteed, that your access to the semaphore counter is atomic. If you could peek into the counter, and ...


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The documentation describes the return value of the Release() method like this: The count on the semaphore before the Release method was called Note that this is different from saying that the method returns the value the semaphore had just before being released. In particular, if you have two threads racing to release the semaphore, they could both ...


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Literal answer: no, you cannot atomically reset a semaphore. In the single consumer case, you probably shouldn't be using a semaphore in the first place. An auto-reset event is sufficient, with a consumer loop like this: try to pop an item from the queue if successful, process it; return to top of loop if the queue is empty, wait on the event, then ...



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