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40

This is a very bad idea. Binary data should always be sent in a way that: Handles different endianness Handles different padding Handles differences in the byte-sizes of intrinsic types Don't ever write a whole struct in a binary way, not to a file, not to a socket. Always write each field separately, and read them the same way. You need to have ...


12

EFAULT It happen if the memory address of some argument passed to sendto (or more generally to any system call) is invalid. Think of it as a sort of SIGSEGV in kernel land regarding your syscall. For instance, if you pass a null or invalid buffer pointer (for reading, writing, sending, recieving...), you get that See errno(3), sendto(2) etc... man pages. ...


10

You're giving the wrong size for the address. addr is really a struct sockaddr_in, not a struct sockaddr. Change the last parameter of sendto to sizeof(address)


7

The error you are getting: EAGAIN or EWOULDBLOCK: The socket is marked nonblocking and the requested operation would block. POSIX.1-2001 allows either error to be returned for this case, and does not require these constants to have the same value, so a portable application should check for both possibilities. You set the socket to non-blocking ...


7

Each registered Kindle has an associated email address. Users can email documents to this address to copy them to their Kindle device and to Amazon's associated cloud storage. However, by default only the email address associated with the user's Amazon account is whitelisted. You must ask the user to add your email address to their Approved Senders list. ...


6

Find out what the dragged file was: http://docs.python.org/library/sys.html#sys.argv Open it: http://docs.python.org/library/functions.html#open Read it in: http://docs.python.org/library/stdtypes.html#file.read Post it: http://docs.python.org/library/urllib2.html#urllib2.urlopen


6

In Python 3, the string (first) argument must be of type bytes or buffer, not str. You'll get that error message if you supply the optional flags parameter. Change data to: data = b'UDP Test Data' You might want to file a bug report about that at the python.org bug tracker. [EDIT: already filed as noted by Dav] ... >>> data = 'UDP Test Data' ...


6

You can never receive an error, or notice for a UDP packet that did not reach destination.


6

First, you have to malloc() in order to allocate memory for the struct hostent. You can transfer a struct through sendto()/recvfrom() but since struct hostent contains pointers, the members of this struct that are pointers have no meaning as soon as they are transfered to the other end.


6

If you are going to use ACTION_SENDTO, the Uri should use the mailto: or smsto: scheme. So, try mailto:abcd@gmail.com.


5

It has nothing to do with having to bind() - in fact take a look at this syntax: if (numbytes == -1); { perror("sendto"); exit(1); } you have a condidion without the body, and then the body without the condition, which always executes (as you can observe:). Add the printf of ...


5

SOCK_STREAM is for TCP, not UDP. Use SOCK_DGRAM. And don't forget to change to network byte order on the port number and other host specific values. Other than that your program runs fine and doesn't crash (if you change the socket to the right type).


5

if you are using Intent.setData for sending email then change your code as: String uriText = "mailto:someone@example.com" + "?subject=" + URLEncoder.encode("Subject") + "&body=" + URLEncoder.encode("some text here"); Uri uri = Uri.parse(uriText); Intent sendIntent = new Intent(Intent.ACTION_SENDTO); ...


4

There is no need to write own serialisation routines for short and long integer types - use htons()/htonl() POSIX functions.


4

If you don't want to write the serialisation code yourself, find a proper serialisation framework, and use that. Maybe Google's protocol buffers would be possible?


4

Using the 'pragma' pack option did solved my problem but I am not sure if it has any dependencies ?? #pragma pack(1) // this helps to pack the struct to 5-bytes struct packet { int i; char j; }; #pragma pack(0) // turn packing off Then the following lines of code worked out fine without any problem n = sendto(sock,&pkt,sizeof(struct ...


4

In general you want to avoid transferring raw structures over networks unless they have specifically been designed for use as network transport, or unless you are absolutely sure that both ends will always be exactly the same architecture. Differences in padding and byte ordering may cause the data to appear garbled at the other end. The particular type of ...


4

Related issue on the Python bugtracker: http://bugs.python.org/issue5421


4

I'd remove the & in front of hp


4

inet_ntop probably isn't what you want - it converts from network (i.e. wire) format into presentation format (i.e. "1.2.3.4"). Try: address.sin_addr.s_addr = *((unsigned long *)destination_host->h_addr);


4

The sendto call didn't fail. The datagram was sent to the destination. The recipient of the datagram or some router on the way to it might return an error response (host unreachable, port unreachable, TTL exceeded). But the sendto call will be history by the time your system receives it. Some operating systems do provide a way to find out this occurred, ...


4

Well, sendto lets you specify the amount of data you want to send, and usleep can be used to control how often you send something, so between the two of them you can control the rate. For example, if you call sendto to send chunks of 1kb, and pause (usleep) for 1/10th of a second between sendto() calls, you'll be sending at a rate of 10kb per second.


4

From tldp's multicast howto: Usually, the system administrator specifies the default interface multicast datagrams should be sent from. The programmer can override this and choose a concrete outgoing interface for a given socket with this option. struct in_addr interface_addr; setsockopt (socket, IPPROTO_IP, IP_MULTICAST_IF, &interface_addr, ...


4

You forgot the parentheses: if( ( bcount = sendto (sockfd,new_packet,iphdr_new->ip_len,0,(struct sockaddr *)&sin,sizeof(sin))<0) ) since the assignment operator (=) has lower precedence than the smaller-than operator (<), the expression if (bcount = sendto( .. ) < 0 ) is equal to ` if (bcount = (sendto( .. ) < 0) ) and since ...


4

The address I was giving sendto came from the first result of getaddrinfo. Turns out that first result is now an IPV6 result (using sockaddr_in6). sendto on OS 10.8 (at least for now) only seems to work with sockaddr_in address. Make sure to pass a hint to getaddrinfo that says you only want ipv4 addresses, i.e. struct addrinfo hint; memset( &hint, 0, ...


4

You need to pass a valid pointer to recvfrom. (unsigned int *)sizeof(struct sockaddr_in) is not a valid pointer. Change if(recvfrom(socket_fd, buffer, 2, 0, (struct sockaddr*)&dest_addr, (unsigned int *)sizeof(struct sockaddr_in) == -1) to e.g. socklen_t len = sizeof dest_addr; if(recvfrom(socket_fd, buffer, 2, 0, ...


4

I think you are confusing "message" and "dest_addr". Let's look at the prototype for sendto in expanded form: ssize_t sendto (int sockfd, const void *buf, size_t length, int flags, const struct sockaddr *dest_addr, socklen_t addrlen); sockfd - this is the socket you ...


4

Try: if ((sendto(sock, msg, strlen(msg), 0, (struct sockaddr *)ip, sizeof(struct sockaddr_in))) != -1) { You're giving it the size of a pointer, not the size of the structure. And it needs to be the specific structure type, not the generic type.


4

You can send()/sendto() a zero-byte message on a domain datagram or UDP socket, in which case a returned length of 0 bytes is correct. If you are seeing this unexpectedly, verify your len parameter in your sendto(int fd, void const *buf, size_t len, int flags, struct const *dest, sockles_t addrlen) call.



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