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11

You need to use match not split. Try this. var str = "I like turtles. Do you? Awesome! hahaha. lol!!! What's going on????"; var result = str.match( /[^\.!\?]+[\.!\?]+/g ); var expect = ["I like turtles.", " Do you?", " Awesome!", " hahaha.", " lol!!!", " What's going on????"]; console.log( result.join(" ") === expect.join(" ") ) console.log( ...


8

You need str.split() to split each string into words: word_list = [word for line in sentence for word in line.split()]


7

Just .split and .join: word_list = ' '.join(sentence).split(' ')


7

You can use lookbehind as @Piotr Findeisen suggested (+1): public class RegexExample{ public static void main(String[] args) { String s = "firstWordWithSpaceAfter secondWordWithSpaceAfter wordWithLineBreakAfter\nlastWord"; String sa[] = s.split("(?<=[ \\n])"); for (String saa : sa ) System.out.println("[" + saa + "]"); } } ...


7

A regex solution. (\b[^\s]+\b) And if you really want to fix that last . on i.e. you could use this. ((\b[^\s]+\b)((?<=\.\w).)?) Here's the code I'm using. var input = "The moon is our natural satellite, i.e. it rotates around the Earth!"; var matches = Regex.Matches(input, @"((\b[^\s]+\b)((?<=\.\w).)?)"); foreach(var match in matches) ...


7

I suspect the solution you're looking for is much more complex than you think. You're looking for some form of actual language analysis, or at a minimum a dictionary, so that you can determine whether a period is part of a word or ends a sentence. Have you considered the fact that it may do both? Consider adding a dictionary of allowed "words that contain ...


6

Rails has Array#to_sentence that will do the same as array.join(', ') and additionally add "and " before the last item. puts "Elements are: #{["element 1", "element 2", "element 3"].to_sentence}." The rest, as you can see, is just putting it together.


6

Assuming the "words" are always separated by a single space. Use String.split() String[] words = "He and his brother playing football.".split("\\s+"); for (int i = 0, l = words.length; i + 1 < l; i++) System.out.println(words[i] + " " + words[i + 1]);


5

Try a negative lookahead: \.(?!\d) What this matches is any period that's not followed by a digit.


5

Conside using zero-width positive lookbehind / lookahead. See Pattern javadoc around Special constructs (non-capturing)


5

Yes it helps to mention you're working with German :) A regex-based sentence detector with list of abbreviations can be found in GATE. It uses the three files located here. The regular expressions are pretty simple: //more than 2 new lines ...


4

You are looking for a natural language library. For Python there is Natural Language Toolkit (NLTK). For example you could take a look at the PunktSentenceTokenizer. The PunktSentenceTokenizer divides a text into a list of sentences, by using an unsupervised algorithm to build a model for abbreviation words, collocations, and words that start sentences. ...


4

There are 2 problems with the code. One is the period just before the end-if. The other is that end_if is not the same as end-if. Only end-if is used in Cobol. The end_if is being taken as a paragraph name. Therefore, it does not (and should not) produce a compiler warning message.


3

Instead of if (!(input[i + 2] >= input.Length)) It should be if (!(i + 2 >= input.Length)) You are comparing indices, not characters


3

It never ceases to amaze me how many people confuse these operations. First you need to convert the varchar 'fake date' to a real date: use to_date for this. Then you need to convert the date to a varchar for presentation: use to_char for this. select to_char(to_date(column, 'yyyyMMdd_hhmmss.ttt'), 'dd/MM/yyyy hh:mm:ss,ttt') from your_table; should do ...


3

Very simple regexp: '^Take the (.*) bound train to (.*)\.$' that stores [train] in the first capture group and [stop] in the second. ^ # Match the start of the string Take the # Match the literal string (.*) # Capture the [train] bound train to # Match the literal string (.*) # Capture the [stop] \. ...


3

A much better approach would be to use profile activations. <profiles> <profile> <id>was.base.v60</id> <activation> <property> <name>env.WAS60_HOME</name> </property> </activation> <dependencies> <dependency> .... ...


3

Try this instead:- sentences = text.split(/[\\.!\?]/); ? is a special char in regular expressions so need to be escaped. Sorry I miss read your question - if you want to keep delimiters then you need to use match not split see this question


3

Try this: import re s1 = "This has no long words" s2 = "This has oooone long word" def has_long(sentence): elong = re.compile("([a-zA-Z])\\1{2,}") return bool(elong.search(sentence)) print has_long(s1) False print has_long(s2) True


3

@HughBothwell had a good idea. As far as I know, there is not a single English word that has the same letter repeat three consecutive times. So, you can search for words that do this: >>> from re import search >>> mystr = "word word soooo word tooo thaaatttt word" >>> [x for x in mystr.split() if search(r'(?i)[a-z]\1\1+', x)] ...


3

It's not as easy as you might think. You need to change the location where the printing command is called and place it below revSentence() recursive call, this is called post-order traversal, while the one you are doing is called pre-order traversal. You also need a stack to push the reversed words. #include <iostream> #include <string> ...


3

Assuming the text file dijk doesn't actually contain any newlines, you could do this in perl: perl -MLingua::EN::Sentence=get_sentences -ne ' print "$_\n" for grep { /graph/ } @{get_sentences($_)}' dijk The Lingua::EN::Sentence module is smart enough to deal with well-known abbreviations and you can add your own if necessary. Output: For a given source ...


3

This is a fixed version of your sample code: Your principal problem is that every time you found and ' ' or '\0' you copy the bytes of the reverse string from the beginning to that point. Example in loop 5 you copy from index 0-5 (stac) from reverse to str in reverse order, but in in loop 10 you copy from index 0-10 (stac ekil) from reverse to str in ...


2

Dissecting your algorithm in pieces. First, you find the length of the string, not including the null char terminator. This is correct, though could be simplified. size_t len = 0; for (int i = 0; sentence[i] != '\0'; i++) { len++; } cout << len << endl; This could easily be written simply as: size_t len = 0; while (sentence[len]) ...


2

You need to use capturing groups. So that you can refer the captured groups through back-reference. Regex: .*(?<= \")([^"]*).* Replacement string: <key>\1</key> DEMO


2

teamnames=["Blackpool","Blackburn","Arsenal"] user_input = raw_input("Your choice: ") # You have to handle the case where 2 or more teams starts with the same string. # For example the user input is 'B'. So you have to select between "Blackpool" and # "Blackburn" filtered_teams = filter(lambda x: x.startswith(user_input), teamnames) if len(filtered_teams) ...


2

Replacing words with synonyms is probably the first thing to try, but be careful not to miss multiple words expressions and idioms. Also, make sure you choose a synonym with the same part of speech. they look for a good solution < ! > they view/stare/... for a good solution they work hard < ! > they job/task/… hard More complicated ...


2

Well, you can make a list of every elongated word logically possible. Then loop through the words in the sentence then the words in the list to find elongated words. sentence = "Hoow arre you doing?" elongated = ["hoow",'arre','youu','yoou','meee'] #You will need to have a much larger list for word in sentence: word = word.lower() for e_word in ...


2

openNLP had some major changes. The bad news is it looks very different than it used to. The good news is that it's more flexible and the functionality you enjoyed before is still there, you just have to find it. This will give you what you're after: ?Maxent_Sent_Token_Annotator Just work through the example and you'll see the functionality you're ...


2

I don't know how to reshape a corpus but that would be a fantastic functionality to have. I guess my approach would be something like this: Using these packages # Load Packages require(tm) require(NLP) require(openNLP) I would set up my text to sentences function as follows: convert_text_to_sentences <- function(text, lang = "en") { # Function to ...



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