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3

There are several things that you need to modify: Note that in the image you give us the alignment goes from the bottom-right corner to the top-left corner. So in that image they are not really aligning AACAGTTACC and TAAGGTCA, but CCATTGACAA and ACTGGAAT. You say that you want a global alignment, but you actually compute a local alignment. The main ...


3

Duplicate post on BioStars, http://www.biostars.org/p/87226/#87399 This appears to be down to a subtle change in the EMBOSS output. You have an extremely old version, EMBOSS version 2.10.0 (February 2005), and your output file has lines like this: gag 1288 -------------------------------------------------- 1287 Using a newer version of ...


3

There's a built in function called "adist" that computes a measure of distance between two words. It's like using "agrep", except it returns the distance, instead of whether the words match according to some approximate matching criteria. For the special case of words that can be interchanged with a comma(e.g. "hello,world" should be close to ...


2

The important thing to remember about traceback in Smith-Waterman is that the matrix a value is in determines the direction that you move. So, if you are in F you're moving diagonally, if you're in Ix, you're moving horizontally, and if you're in Iy, you're moving vertically. This means that all you need to store in the pointer matrix is the matrix that you ...


2

I have gotten in touch with Omar, the author of RWebLogo, and he has been really helpful in pinpointing my problems and resolving the issue. First, he advised to run the RWebLogo on a test sequence on the terminal: /Library/Frameworks/R.framework/Versions/3.1/Resources/library/RWebLogo/extdata/weblogo-3.3/weblogo -f test_seqs.txt -o ~/Desktop/out.pdf -F ...


2

According to the Biopython docs, you can get column x with align[:, x] So the following should do the job for you: from Bio import AlignIO align = AlignIO.read("Clustalw/opuntia.aln", "clustal") indices = [12, 52, 68, 45] columns_as_strings = [] for column in indices: columns_as_strings.append(align[:, column])


2

The problem is that you're passing the wrong format file to Biopython. An explanation follows. Formatting The format of the file you've linked to is srspair (see the header of pair1_aligned.fasta). It's worth noting that this is not the FASTA format - that's an entirely different format. Delving into the source of Biopython's EmbossIO, we can see that the ...


2

Well this site isn't supposed to be us doing your homework but it's a simple question so let's have a crack at it: We'll assume the points you make originally are valid (about the scoring). Suppose the contrary, that there exists some local alignment which is less than G. If this were true, then it means your best local alignment (meaning you started ...


2

library(WeightedCluster) (agnesRange <- wcKMedRange(rubinius.dist, 2:10)) plot(agnesRange, stat = c("ASW", "HG", "PBC"), lwd = 5) This will give multiple indices for finding the ideal number of clusters, as well as as graph. More information about the indices can be found here (under cluster quality): http://mephisto.unige.ch/weightedcluster/


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You could do something like this using mapply and setting the sequence of columns to loop across. colpicks <- seq(10,1000,by=10) mapply(function(start,stop) seqdef(df[,start:stop]), colpicks-9, colpicks)


2

Consider HDLC (see the sections on Framing).


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Here is a link to the discussion on the bioconductor mailing list. So far there is no easy way to print the alignment formatted, but maybe it's worth implementing. https://stat.ethz.ch/pipermail/bioconductor/2012-April/044904.html


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Look at how Smith-Waterman works. You have two sequences (S1 of length N, S2 of length M) and you create an NxM matrix (let's call it A) where A(i,j) is "the best score alignment of S1[1..i] and S2[1..j]." To do that, you write a recurrance about how to get A(i,j) based on the last element - A(i,j) is the best of A(i-1, j-1) + match/mismatch score ...


1

1) Pass as an argument through your recursive function a Stack (or other collection). 2) When you call yourself recursively, also push onto the stack what step you are taking (e.g. using an enumeration of step types and ints/chars/strings/whatever indicating what it is doing). 3) When you return from the call in 2), pop the stack and repeat 2). 4) When ...


1

Let ∑ be the alphabet (e.g., {A, C, G, T}). Let L ⊆ ∑* be the set of short library sequences. Compute a minimum-state DFA (Q, ∑, ∂, q0, F) for L*. We scan the long sequence x ∈ ∑* one letter at a time. Let x' be the prefix of x that has been consumed. We maintain, for every state q ∈ Q, the minimum cq(x') over [every sequence y ∈ ∑* such that ∂(q0, y) = q] ...


1

I think you may be able to cast this problem as a more general string diff problem instead of a string alignment. Consider how GNU diff is used for finding differences between two files, and use the same algorithms as are used to perform an N-way diff. I'm not sure if the time/memory complexity of this approach is amenable to your needs, but you can at ...


1

There is an algorithm based on Levenshtein algorithm to compute the longest common sequence, with optional spaces. Not sure if that helps.


1

A simple alternative would be to use JTextArea, representing each protein sequence as a line of text, with hyphens for gaps. If you go forward with the JTable idea, look at: javax.swing.table.AbstractTableModel, which allows you to provide and update data javax.swing.table.TableCellRenderer, which allows you to specify how to draw data


1

I couldn't find such a tool or library, so I implemented my own Python library for generic sequence alignment. It is open-source: https://github.com/eseraygun/python-alignment You can also download it from PyPI: http://pypi.python.org/pypi/alignment


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The algorithm effectively returns a 2D table of all possible subsequences. You must do the additional work of extracking the actual subsequences, which apparently you are doing. During alignment (back-)tracking, you can have an admission check: if(subsequence.length() > 2) results.add(subsequence); If you don't want to go as I mention, then do you ...


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I think I understand what you are trying to do but as @alko has said - comments in your code will definitely help a lot. As to finding an exact match around the gap you could run a string comparison: Something along the lines of: if query[position -3: position] == database[position -3: position] and query[position +1: position +3] == database[position ...


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OK. Here's some code to do what you want. I've used the pretty print library (pprint) so that the output looks nice. (It looks nicest if the numbers in the matrix are single digit, but the alignment gets a little messed up if there are multi-digit numbers.) How does it work? Because you only need to change numbers on the main diagonal and and those on the ...


1

If your primary issue in the time it takes to re-run alignment (re-computing the PWI matrix should be computationally cheap), then MUSCLE has the capability to do what you're looking for, a procedure commonly termed "profile-profile alignment". Profile-profile alignment When passing the -profile flag, the alignments will be "re-aligned to each other, ...


1

You should be able to handle this as an extension of the standard dynamic programming approach to sequence alignment. The wrinkle is that there are now multiple ways that you could be at a given cell in the matrix, because you could have gotten there with using different amounts of gaps. As a result, you need to keep track of the best score that you could ...


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You can make a mapping of peptides to nucleotides with the addition of your missing character: codons = str.maketrans({'M' : 'ATG', 'R' : 'CGT', ..., '-' : '---'}) # Your missing character peptide = 'M-R' result = peptide.translate(codons) and then translate the full sequence.


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All you need to do is split the nucleotide sequence into triplets. Each amino-acid is a triplet, each gap is three gaps. so in pseudo code: for x in range(0, len(aminoacid)): if x != "-": print nucleotide[3x:3x+3] else: print "---"


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You can of course work one column at a time. Then to transform column [x1, x2, x3, ...] into column [y1, y2, y3, ...] you have a few cases: case (A): x1 is the same as y1: this is the easy case, you need to match the rest case (B): x1 is - and y1 is not: you need to insert all remaining y boxes case (C): y1 is - and x1 is not: you need to remove all ...


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Here's a fairly long but correct (as far as I can tell from the question discussion) implementation using recursion. Important points: I iterate through both lists using .pop(index). This lets me use recursion, as both lists get smaller and smaller as the function recurs, leading to a point where one list is of len(0). Numbers can be chosen from either ...


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Each letter will need to be wrapped in a SPAN and CSS class names applied to each in order to style them they way you want.


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Use id and iterate in javascript with document.getElementById('yourId') or document.getElementsByTagName('HTMLTag'). You can take random colors and set the color with conditionals.



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