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70

If else condition, also called alternatives in UML terms can indeed be represented in sequence diagrams. Here is a link where you can find some nice resources on the subject http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/rational/library/3101.html


16

A box enclosing the message send arrow (and whatever else is inside the same repetitive construct). See this tutorial for an example. link to larger image


15

Here is one diagram that may be useful, and on the left-hand side you can see the explanation: http://sdedit.sourceforge.net/multithreading/example/index.html


15

The other day, I discovered a tool from the University of Victoria called Diver: Dynamic Interactive Views For Reverse Engineering. You can either find a method and create a static sequence diagram starting with that method or you can run an application in a trace mode to capture the sequence diagram for a particular execution of an application.


13

The dashed line is the lifeline (see here for an explanation). What you want to do is extend the execution occurrence (the wide rectangle). To do this, right click on the occurrence and select "Add connection points".


13

The best software I've found and I usually use to make sequence diagrams from plain text is SDEdit. It's a Java tool, so you can use it in any operating system. And it's free software! With this tool, you write the following: #![SD ticket order] ext:External[pe] user:Actor /order:Order[x] db:TicketDB acc:Account ext:user.order a ticket! user:order.new() ...


12

There is www.websequencediagrams.com that is quite cool. I'm having trouble taking it seriously, but it does a really good job at very low effort from my side.


12

When a new thread is started (and a message from an user always starts a new thread) it does not stop until it is explicitly stopped or until the diagram ends. E.g. atm:stop terminates the atm thread here a first attempt (everything in multithreaded mode): al:Actor bill:Actor atm:ATM[a] bank:Bank[a] al:atm.give me $10 atm:al has $3=bank.check al's ...


12

Based on the "alt" box depicted in the IBM link given by @luistm, I was able to replicate something similar in Dia: The "alt" box was drawn with the UML Large Package object. (The Small Package doesn't allow you to resize it.) The condition labels are just Text objects (found on the upper [static] pane in the left toolbar, marked with the T). The ...


12

First and for most let me discuss UML and Use Cases. UML is just a graphical way of describing software systems. There are two types of UML namely: UML Sketching - here you only want to communicate an idea and go through different alternative approaches. It's not specific but it only gives the basic ideas. UML Blueprint - This is a very detailed type of ...


10

Draw a rectangle around the group of calls involved. Outside the box put text that says, "LOOP: [condition]" and fill in the condition. This will get you close to the UML for loops.


10

For sequence diagrams, you may take a look at websequencediagrams - it creates nice looking diagrams and has a lot of functionalities (examples page). It's not a command line utility, but it does have its web-API. ditaa creates nice looking diagrams from ascii source. Written in java, it can be called on the command line to convert ascii text to diagrams.


9

I've found that "normal" sequence diagrams are almost always more of a pain than they're worth (although I have found them useful for showing data flow in LINQ). Doing a "rough and ready" diagram and explaining it (preferably in person, but with plenty of words either way) works better in my experience. I think it's a good idea to have a diagram (or ...


9

I think jtracert is what you are looking for. It generates a sequence diagram from a running Java program. Also, because its output is a text description of the diagram (in the formats of several popular SD tools), you can use grep to filter for only the classes you are interested in.


9

Have a look at UMLet, a Free UML Tool for Fast UML Diagrams which is aimed at fast UML sketching.


9

They are called "railroad diagrams", because of their resemblance to a railroad track. They were often used to describe the grammar of older languages, before more formal grammars became routinely used. The problem with them is you can't easily feed them into tools like parser generators, or grammar checkers, so they are not used so much these days.


9

You should try cacoo.com. Absolutely the best online diagram tool I have ever seen. I am even considering to purchase a license even thought they have free version which serves up to 25 stencils. With cacoo, you can save your diagrams as public or private send your diagrams to others if you want, you can make your diagram editable, even without ...


8

Quick Sequence Diagram Editor might suit your needs. The syntax is strange, but easy to learn. The thing I like about it is that the diagrams are specified using text files, which makes me happy since I don't like the 'pure visual' approach used by the Visio and Rational tools. The example on the official site may look intimidating but the syntax is ...


8

The diagram from Ruben's answer is correct, but general UML answer is missing. It creates the other lifeline when the "create" line (dashed in this case) connects to the box/label/top of the created life line. From example: WebServer in it's action creates a View and the action done by the view creates the Widget. ----- | a | ----- | []---->----- ...


8

A Self Message is a type of message which represents the execution or operation call in the same object lifeline. A recursive message is a type of self message that is executed recursively. A re-entrant message is where you have an object A and and oject B. A makes a call C to B B needs some data from A to complete call C B sends a message to A get the ...


8

You should use a self message when you are calling functions in the class which either don't call other functions, don't send any messages (or they do but you don't want to show this in the sequence). If you also want to model how the inner functions of the class interact with other lifelines, you have to use recursive calls to show this, otherwise the ...


8

I believe the perfect tool to solve your problem is Diver: Dynamic Interactive Views For Reverse Engineering. It provides both static and dynamic sequence diagrams and looks to solve all your requirements from your question. It is a plugin for Eclipse and lets you: Easily trace your Java programs Visualize your program’s runtime functionality Filter your ...


7

OS-agnostic, web 2.0 cloud-filled goodness here: http://www.websequencediagrams.com/


7

The code is an arbitrary example. The code has nothing to do with the question, merely demonstrates often misleading code which could benefit from being described. You can not describe closures and scoping in UML. There is simply no support for it, not in sequence diagrams anyway. Closures in JavaScript is a bit like defining a class in Java or C#, you ...


7

Try MaintainJ. MaintainJ generates sequence diagrams at runtime for a use case. It provides multiple ways to filter out unwanted calls. Yes, filtering out unwanted calls is the most important feature needed in sequence diagram generating tools. Besides, MaintainJ provides a neat interface to explore the diagram and search for calls in one use case or across ...


7

Both diagrams give the same information, but the sequence diagram emphasizes time in its layout and the communication diagram emphasizes the objects that are communicating in its layout. Time is implicit in sequence diagrams (it is inferred by vertical position), while it is given explicitly in communication diagrams (via numbers). To quote Scott Ambler ...


6

Enterprise Architect will generate sequence diagrams from running code. You set break points where you want your diagramming to begin and end and then run the code and it will give you a sequence diagram of the code that ran. I have done this successfully with C# code. Here are the instructions from the user guide.


6

Correct, use a "create" message to show instantiation of the object represented by the target lifeline. Here's an example from a topic in the VS 2010 Ultimate docs: UML Sequence Diagrams: Reference at http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd409377%28VS.100%29.aspx


6

I think you're both wrong. They should be drawn at the same time. As you're drawing your sequence diagram, you will undoubtedly come up with properties that you will need to keep track of the state, or that you hadn't thought of if you do the class diagram in a vacuum. Of course, this is highly subjective and personal, but years of real-world experience ...


6

Did you give Architexa a try. Eclipse plugin and free for personal use.



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