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134

There is lots of information about the Fibonacci Sequence on wikipedia and on wolfram. A lot more than you may need. Anyway it is a good thing to learn how to use these resources to find (quickly if possible) what you need. Write Fib sequence formula to infinite In math, it's given in a recursive form: In programming, infinite doesn't exist. You can use ...


97

The following query gives names of all sequences. SELECT c.relname FROM pg_class c WHERE c.relkind = 'S'; Typically a sequence is named as ${table}_id_seq. Simple regex pattern matching will give you the table name. To get last value of a sequence use the following query: SELECT last_value FROM test_id_seq;


76

OK, this is a very old question, which I'm first seeing now. You'll need to differentiate between sequence numbers and unique IDs that are (optionally) loosely sortable by a specific criteria (typically generation time). True sequence numbers imply knowledge of what all other workers have done, and as such require shared state. There is no easy way of doing ...


76

Once again, it seems I've answered my own question by getting impatient and asking it in #clojure on Freenode. Good thing answering your own questions is encouraged on Stackoverflow.com :D I had a quick discussion with Rich Hickey, and here is the gist of it. [12:21] <Raynes> Vectors aren't seqs, right? [12:21] <rhickey> Raynes: no, but they ...


69

If you've done Java programming a lot, and are familiar with the Java collection framework, think of lists like LinkedList, and vectors like ArrayList. So you can pretty much choose containers the same way. For further clarification: if you intend to add items individually to the front or the back of the sequence a lot, a linked list is much better than a ...


61

This is already in the framework: Enumerable.Range. For other types, you might be interested in the range classes in my MiscUtil library.


48

Warning: boost::zip_iterator as of Boost 1.48.0 will cause undefined behavior if the length of the input containers are not the same (it may crash or iterate beyond the end). A variadic version of zip: #include <boost/iterator/zip_iterator.hpp> #include <boost/range.hpp> template <typename... T> auto zip(const T&... containers) -&...


38

As Dennis Traub has pointed out, the overload of Aggregate you are using throws that exception when the source sequence is empty. The obvious fix is to use the other overload of Aggregate that accepts an initial seed (you want string.Empty), but that would result in a leading comma in the result which you'll have to get rid of. (EDIT: You can dodge this ...


36

Sql Server 2012 has introduced SEQUENCE objects, which allow you to generate sequential numeric values not associated with any table. Creating them are easy: CREATE SEQUENCE Schema.SequenceName AS int INCREMENT BY 1 ; An example of using them before insertion: DECLARE @NextID int ; SET @NextID = NEXT VALUE FOR Schema.SequenceName; -- Some work happens ...


35

iter(x) will raise a TypeError if x cannot be iterated on -- but that check "accepts" sets and dictionaries, though it "rejects" other non-sequences such as None and numbers. On the other hands, strings (which most applications want to consider "single items" rather than sequences) are in fact sequences (so, any test, unless specialcased for strings, is ...


31

There is no single interface for removing things from all of Clojure's data structure types, possibly because of the different performance characteristics. (disj #{:foo :bar} :foo) ; => #{:bar} (dissoc {:foo 1 :bar 2} :foo) ; => {:bar 2} (pop [:bar :foo]) ; => [:bar] (pop (list :foo :bar)) ; => (:bar) These also ...


29

Vectors have O(1) random access times, but they have to be preallocated. Lists can be dynamically extended, but accessing a random element is O(n).


28

With a comprehension? Well... >>> seq = '012345' >>> swapped_pairs = zip(seq[1::2], seq[::2]) >>> ''.join(item for pair in swapped_pairs for item in pair) '103254'


26

Idiomatic Clojure favors defining independent functions that operate on a very small set of core data structures; this unbundling of methods and data is a strong statement against object orientation and in favour of a functional style. Rich Hickey (creator of Clojure) has repeatedly stated the importance of this; for example here: "Clojure eschews the ...


24

It strikes me that the first thing you should do is order the list. Then it's just a matter of walking through it, remembering the length of your current sequence and detecting when it's ended. To be honest, I suspect that a simple foreach loop is going to be the simplest way of doing that - I can't immediately think of any wonderfully neat LINQ-like ways of ...


23

itertools.groupby seems to fit perfectly! Just define a next_morris function as follows: def next_morris(number): return ''.join('%s%s' % (len(list(group)), digit) for digit, group in itertools.groupby(str(number))) That's all!!! Look: print next_morris(1) 11 print next_morris(111221) 312211 I could use that to make a generator:...


23

I think andih's solution works great. Here is an alternate way because hey why not. It uses concat and distinct: user> (distinct (concat '(1 2 3) '(2 3 4))) => (1 2 3 4)


22

Don't use a subselect, rather use the nextval function directly, like this: update person set unique_number = nextval('number_sequence');


20

Efficient Pythonic generator of the Fibonacci sequence I found this question while trying to get the shortest Pythonic generation of this sequence (later realizing I had seen a similar one in a Python Enhancement Proposal), and I haven't noticed anyone else coming up with my specific solution (although the top answer gets close, but still less elegant), so ...


18

As of 2.6, use abstract base classes. >>> import collections >>> isinstance([], collections.Sequence) True >>> isinstance(0, collections.Sequence) False Furthermore ABC's can be customized to account for exceptions, such as not considering strings to be sequences. Here an example: import abc import collections class Atomic(...


18

You can create and use oracle sequences. The syntax and details are at http://www.techonthenet.com/oracle/sequences.php Also read the article http://rnyb2.blogspot.com/2006/02/potential-pitfall-with-oracle-sequence.html to understand the limitations with respect to AUTONUMBER in other RDBMS


17

after a little bit of pain, i got it. the best way to achieve this is to list all tables select * from pg_tables where schemaname = '<schema_name>' and then, for each table, list all columns with attributes select * from information_schema.columns where table_name = '<table_name>' then, for each column, test if it has a sequence select ...


16

Note, that starting from PostgreSQL 8.4 you can get all information about sequences used in the database via: SELECT * FROM information_schema.sequences; Since I'm using a higher version of PostgreSQL (9.1), and was searching for same answer high and low, I added this answer for posterity's sake and for future searchers.


16

If you don't need sequential numbers but only a unique ID, you can use a DEFAULT of SYS_GUID(). Ie: CREATE TABLE xxx ( ID RAW(16) DEFAULT SYS_GUID() )


16

A ring buffer is a pair of an IndexedSeq and an Int pointer into this sequence. I provide code for a immutable version. Note that not all methods that might be useful are implemented; like the mutators that change the content of the IndexedSeq. With this implementation, shifting is just creating one new object. So it's pretty efficient. Example code class ...


16

Quickest I've found is to start with an empty array and extend it: In [1]: a = [['abc', 'def'], ['ghi'],['xzy']] In [2]: result = [] In [3]: extend = result.extend In [4]: for l in a: ...: extend(l) ...: In [5]: result Out[5]: ['abc', 'def', 'ghi', 'xzy'] This is over twice as fast for the example in Alex Martelli's attempt on: Making a ...


16

Checkout the TimeComplexity page on the py dot org wiki. It covers set/dicts/lists/etc at least as far as time complexity goes.


15

You can use a solution based on boost::zip_iterator. Make a phony container class maintaining references to your containers, and which return zip_iterator from the begin and end member functions. Now you can write for (auto p: zip(c1, c2)) { ... } Example implementation (please test): #include <iterator> #include <boost/iterator/zip_iterator.hpp&...


15

The idea behind the Fibonacci sequence is shown in the following Python code: def fib(n): if n == 1: return 1 elif n == 0: return 0 else: return fib(n-1) + fib(n-2) This means that fib is a function that can do one of three things. It defines fib(1) == 1, fib(0) == 0, and fib(n) to be: fib(n-...



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