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2

The line: bytesize=serial.SEVENBITS …would suggest that you can only send 7-bit bytes, so the 8th bit is being added by the Arduino. Simply discard the 8th bit in your Arduino code and you're good to go.


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May you display the string content as follow: dump(System.Text.Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(str1)) ; dump(System.Text.Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(str2)) ; dump(System.Text.ASCIIEncoding.Default.GetBytes(str1)) ; dump(System.Text.ASCIIEncoding.Default.GetBytes(str2)) ; private void dump(byte[] bytes) { // HexaDecimal display ...


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The serial port settings under Windows can be seen with GetCommState and set with SetCommState. Use the first one to see what the XCTU set. Your code can then use the same settings by calling SetCommState.


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In C, the best documentation you'll ever find is the source code itself, which you can find on your computer at /usr/include/termios.h (actually spread over one or more of the includes within it) — here's the bsd based termios.h for apples I based my answer on, values are likely to change depending on your flavour of Unix. There, you'll find out that your ...


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1) To upload your code into AVR chip, you can use ISP interface. That requires you to connect at least 5 pins: SCK, MISO, MOSI, RESET, GND, and optionally VCC (it used to control or supply voltage, but not mandatory, if your board has it's own power supply). All you need is just to wire 6- or 10-pin ISP connector to that pins of your CPU. To begin ...


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TL;DR According to the FTDI documentation the default configuration of pin CBUS2 is TXDEN, which is expressly designed for this feature, so just use pin CBUS2 for your transceiver enable. Background The FTDI chip is certainly capable of DTR/DSR flow control. But that is for when the hardware handles the flow control by itself (communicating with the far ...


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I always use addrcom to diagnose port. http://www.ontrak.net/adrcom.htm Also, you can short circuit pin 2 with 3 on DB9 and see weather do you receive the same data you have sent over COM. If you do so it means that your USB-RS-232 adapter cable working properly.


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Short Answer You can't. Long Answer Just kidding you can but let me be clear this functionality is NOT trivial. What you want to look into is an API called Windows Hooks. It's a Microsoft C++ API (woo interop fun!) that allows a program to insert itself into the message pump of a program or of the system as a whole. However, this doesn't simply allow you ...


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same issue for me. I have a modem that follows CDC-ACM standard; devcon returns the following information: [10.255.252.48]: PS C:\Users\Administrator\Documents> devcon status USB\VID_413C USB\VID_413C&PID_81AC\359336050072839 Name: USB Composite Device Driver is running. USB\VID_413C&PID_81AC&MI_06\6&A3D0A38&0&0006 Name: USB ...


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The best thing to do here is use a udev rule. This will allow you to symlink the device to a specific port, something like /dev/ttyXBEE and /dev/ttySMS in your case. To accomplish this, you need to query the devices using udevadm to find some unique identifying information, then create a file /etc/udev/rules.d/99-usbserial.rules that will tell the Pi how to ...


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The point is that when the connected device to the serial port gets disconnected, you will receive null in the readline so if it's null, you attempt to reconnect. Also, you need to set a timeout, otherwise readline will just wait forever. Python example: import serial import threading import time class MainTHread(threading.Thread): def __init__(self): ...


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What are the common principles? This is extremely broad. You'd have to read the RS232 spec, or whichever serial spec the device adheres to (which could even be RS485). For the remainder of your questions, let's assume it's RS232, which is the most common by far. Wikipedia has some good information once you get to the part that you actually care about; ...


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The actual values of the macros depend on the platform (e.g., on Linux CSTOPB is defined as 0100 whereas on some BSDs it is 02000). This is why you should not make assumptions as to their exact values. For instance, it is indeed common that CSIZE and CS8 have the same value, but on some platforms they might not, hence you first AND with the complement of ...


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CreateFile is called with an unterminated string. I suggest using portName.c_str() instead of the roll-your-own string portNumber. Why? The loop generating portNumber copies the characters in the string, but leaves out the terminating NULL. Odds are pretty good that debug mode politely zeroes portNumber when newed so portNumber comes pre-terminated. ...


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You are asking about the ability to handle requests from the serial port (such as a username or password prompt), and then to respond to those requests appropriately, such as by sending the username or password. This is a fairly common use-case, but is not handled directly by pyserial, which only handles dumb pipes for bytes in both directions. One package ...


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I can't talk to the specific API or why you are not getting an event. However, your backup plan of parsing the inputStream looking for RING has a few potential issues. The principal one is that your implementation is depending on RING being sent/read in the same read operation. There's no guarantee of that - it is quite possible, depending on ...


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since the Arduino Pro Micro operates at a voltage level of 5V like the Uno, it's serial connection also uses 5V. This means the voltage divider circuit shown in your link works also for the Pro Micro. If you want you can do the math on your own: Vout = (R2/(R1+R2)) * Vin Vout is the input voltage at the Rx pin of the RPi Vin is the output voltage of the ...


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unsigned int is larger than the size 1 which you gave as the number of bytes to read as argument to read. Hence only one byte was read into the unsigned int, and the rest is basically uninitialized or leftover data. Read to an unsigned char, i.e., unsigned char x; read(port, &x, 1); You can still print it with printf as before.


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From your comment, you're doing this: unsigned int x; ... read(port, &x,1); This won't work, since you're reading one byte but an int is at least 2 or 4 bytes on most systems. So one byte of the int contains the value you want but the rest contain garbage. If you're reading data a byte at a time, you should declare x as an unsigned char which is one ...


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Most RS232 barcode scanners are sending EANs in raw form, but in line by line form. Every line has to end with \r\n.


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From the MSDN page on CreateFile: To specify a COM port number greater than 9, use the following syntax: "\.\COM10". This syntax works for all port numbers and hardware that allows COM port numbers to be specified.


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Serial port communication a byte at a time is inherently slow, even before you start logging. You could get farther and farther behind, and yes, if you have flow-control going on, you could easily cause your source to timeout by adding even more delay. (If you don't have flow control, you will simply lose data.) Byte-at-a time serial is sucky even before ...


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I have seen this post for while, and I have had the same issue closing serialport when using gnu.io package, which is also called RXTX. This is not a final answer, but a suggestion to alternative solution I found. RXTX has two problems in my opinion: Depending on your IDE, you need to place the Mac: RXTXcomm.jar and librxtxSerial.jnilib PC: RXTXcomm.jar, ...



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