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The reason that it is converting the indexes to strings is because the last index intercept [-11.4551819018] in your series data is a string. The documentation for the Pandas data frames state that when constructing a data frame from a series the data frame keeps the same indexing from the series which causes the conversion to ...


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You are using a fairly old version of pandas (current is 0.15.2). So Index is ultimately a sub-class of ndarray a pretty inflexible class to sub-class. Pandas changes to NOT sub-class this in 0.15.0. Not sure of your goals here. Using a custom object index is pretty tricky to get right. Pandas has a new index type coming up in 0.16.0 (see here), as well as ...


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As I'm not sure of what values you are binding, it would be better to capture all values above and inclusive of your maximum. I suggest changing your first IF statement to: if (c.Series[s].YValuesPerPoint >= 255) c.Series[s].Color = Color.Red;


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If I understand right, you could do df[vari+'_count_litter']. However, you may be better off using a MultiIndex that would let you do df[vari, 'count_litter']. It's difficult to say how to set it up without know what your data structure is and how you want to access it.


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Ok, got it going finally. One has to pass the JSON as an object (and not an array, and neither as string (so, no quotes like ' or " around the object!). Works like a charm here on fiddle. Here the code: $(function () { var options = { chart: { renderTo: 'container', type: 'spline', ...


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I am the OP, but I tried this and it worked: np.floor(series)


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You can use NumPy's built in methods to do this: np.ceil(series) or np.floor(series). Both return a Series object (not an array) so the index information is preserved.


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You could do something like this using NumPy's floor, for instance, with a dataframe: floored_data = data.apply(np.floor) Can't test it right now but an actual and working solution might not be far from it.


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I don't have your dataframe, but here's an example with small data to show that pandas contructs the dataframe as expected (using pandas 0.15.1 and python 3.4). As expected, NaNs are introduced when the indices don't match. The last row of your data is ('intercept', ''), while all the other rows are numbers. So ('intercept', '') goes to the index of each ...


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You could construct a mask -- a boolean array which is True where the Series index equals the particular value: mask = my_series.index.isin(['intercept']) Then you could select the remaining rows in the typical fashion: my_series.loc[~mask] Note that if the value occurs in the index more than once, then all rows with the same index will be removed: ...


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So I think this may get you most of the way there if you have two series of different lengths. This seems like a very manual process but I cannot think of another way using pandas or NumPy functions. >>>> a = Series([1, 3, 3, 5, 5]) >>>> b = Series([5, 10]) First convert your row values a to a DataFrame and make copies of this ...


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The way I used to solve this was to output to a .csv, read it back in (which makes it time zone naive but keeps the time zone it was in), then strip the +'s.


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import pandas as pd ts = ['20140101', '20140102', '20140105', '20140106', '20140107'] xs = pd.Series(data=range(len(ts)), index=pd.to_datetime(ts)) print xs #output 2014-01-01 0 2014-01-02 1 2014-01-05 2 2014-01-06 3 2014-01-07 4 You are missing 2 dates.


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Thanks to euri10 for use_index = False ts = ['20140101', '20140102', '20140105', '20140106', '20140107'] xs = pd.Series(data=range(len(ts)), index=pd.to_datetime(ts)) fig, ax = plt.subplots() xs.plot(use_index=False) ax.set_xticklabels(pd.to_datetime(ts)) ax.set_xticks(range(len(ts))) fig.autofmt_xdate() plt.show()


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Couldn't test it but you may want to use use_index=False and/or xticks


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Since you converted the dates to datetime, pandas is plotting the dates themselves on the x-axis. Since there are days that aren't included in the Series, pandas will leave the appropriate spaces on the x-axis where those points are. If, for some reason, you don't want this (for instance, if you are counting business days and the missing points are ...


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You could loop over each string in each row to create a new series: pd.Series([j for i in s.str.split('\n') for j in i]) It might make more sense to do this on the input rather than creating a temporary series, e.g.: strings = ['This is a single line.', 'This is another one.', 'This is a string\nwith more than one line.'] pd.Series([j for i in strings ...


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For this you are better off using the tooltip.formatter. This gives you much more control over every aspect of the layout. Sample: tooltip: { crosshairs: true, useHTML: true, backgroundColor: '#eee', borderColor: '#000000', borderRadius: 0, formatter: function () { return '<div style="color: ...


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"This" object is serie, so only what you need is refer to the this.name. mouseOver: function () { var color; if(this.name === 'Africa') color = 'green'; else color = 'red'; this.graph.attr('stroke', color); }, Example: ...


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I would not rely on the order of insertion here, but on the retrieval instead. If no ordering is specified, then the default query will return documents in the natural order. If you want to get results in specific order, apply sort parameter: Using sort: http://docs.mongodb.org/manual/reference/method/cursor.sort/#cursor.sort Natural order: ...



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