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200

Prefer EntityManagerFactory and EntityManager. They are defined by the JPA standard. SessionFactory and Session are hibernate-specific. The EntityManager invokes the hibernate session under the hood. And if you need some specific features that are not available in the EntityManager, you can obtain the session by calling: Session session = ...


34

You annotated your Dao class with @Transactional, but not your service class. The line: Visitor storedVisitor = (Visitor) sessionFactory.getCurrentSession().get(Visitor.class, visitorDetails.getTfscNumber(), LockMode.NONE); requires you to be in a transaction. You can fix this by adding the @Transactional annotation to your ProfileService class, or just ...


20

From a static method you can pull the sessionFactory bean from the application context: import org.codehaus.groovy.grails.commons.ApplicationHolder as AH ... def ctx = AH.application.mainContext def sessionFactory = ctx.sessionFactory def session = sessionFactory.currentSession


20

I want to add on this that you can also get Hibernate's session by calling getDelegate() method from EntityManager. ex: Session session = (Session) entityManager.getDelegate();


17

If it's in a service or controller, you just need to declare sessionFactory def sessionFactory to have it injected. After that you can refer to sessionFactory.currentSession to use it. Check out hibernate-filter plugin (file HibernateFilterGrailsPlugin.groovy) for how to inject a bunch of methods that use the session.


16

Your concerns are valid, the solution provided on the wiki page is too simplistic. The transaction should not be managed at the web layer - it should be handled at the service layer. The correct implementation would open a session and bind it to a thread in the filter. No transaction is started. The session is put in flush mode never - read only mode. A ...


14

I solved it by creating my own session context class: public class HybridWebSessionContext : CurrentSessionContext { private const string _itemsKey = "HybridWebSessionContext"; [ThreadStatic] private static ISession _threadSession; // This constructor should be kept, otherwise NHibernate will fail to create an instance of this class. public ...


13

I would start with cleaning your configuration This <context:component-scan base-package="com.example" /> Includes all this <context:component-scan base-package="com.example" /> <context:component-scan base-package="com.example.service" /> <context:component-scan base-package="com.example.service.impl" /> ...


12

The sessionFactory must be a thread-safe singleton. A common pattern in Java is to build the sessionFactory in a static initializer. See HibernateUtil. You can do the same in C#. There are other patterns to implement singleton, including the usage of lock or synchronized sections. Here is slight variant that should solve your problem if I understood it ...


12

You don't seem to have transaction configured yet... you can add the following into your Context Data Config file:- <bean id="transactionManager" class="org.springframework.orm.hibernate3.HibernateTransactionManager"> <property name="sessionFactory" ref="sessionFactory" /> </bean> <tx:advice id="txAdvice"> ...


11

To supply JDBC connections to Session, you need an implementation of ConnectionProvider. Bu default, Hibernate uses DatasourceConnectionProvider which obtains a DataSource instance from JNDI. To use custom DataSource instance use InjectedDataSourceConnectionProvider, and inject the DataSource instance into it. There is TODO note on ...


11

The easy answer: You don't re-use NHibernate sessions. They're not heavyweight objects and they are designed to be created, manipulated and disposed following the Unit of Work pattern. Attempting to "share" these across multiple requests goes against their intended usage. Fundamentally, the cost of synchronizing access to the sessions correctly will ...


10

If you have an id, you just use get: public Weather getCurrentWeather() { return sessionFactory.getCurrentSession().get(Weather.class, 1); } If you do need to do a query, yeah you'll have to grab the top of the result set, or you can use uniqueResult() on the query.


9

I solved the same problem with following 2 steps Placed @Transactional on the service method as suggested jordan002 in his answer on this page. One more thing,If you have 2 configuration files: say application-context.xml(For DB and Application Context Specific configuration) and webmvc-context.xml(For web/controller specific configuration), then you ...


9

Using EntityManagerFactory approach allows us to use callback method annotations like @PrePersist, @PostPersist,@PreUpdate with no extra configuration. Using similar callbacks while using SessionFactory will require extra efforts. Related Hibernate docs can be found here and here. Related SOF Question and Spring Forum discussion


9

Your configuration and usage of hibernate is wrong. You are using Spring and even better Spring Boot, however what you posted tries very hard not to use those frameworks and tries to work around them. I strongly suggest using Spring Boot and let that configure the things for you. First delete your HibernateUtils, burry it deep and never look at it again. ...


8

Spring is telling you exactly what the problem is, you just have to read the log and nested error message: Cannot resolve reference to bean 'sessionFactory' while setting bean property 'sessionFactory'; nested exception is org.springframework.beans.factory.BeanCurrentlyInCreationException: Error creating bean with name 'sessionFactory': FactoryBean ...


8

I just found out that hibernate has {h-schema} replacement that can be used in native sql queries. So this does the job cleanly when you are connected to a one schema in oracle database and want to execute queries against different schemas. Example would be: select * from {h-schema}table_name. This ways instead of doing a manual replaceAll in a query, ...


8

Return factory instead: @Bean public AbstractSessionFactoryBean sessionFactoryBean(){ AnnotationSessionFactoryBean sessionFactoryBean = new AnnotationSessionFactoryBean(); sessionFactoryBean.setConfigLocation(new ClassPathResource("hibernate.cfg.xml")); return sessionFactoryBean; } If you need to inject SessionFactory directly somewhere in ...


8

I recommend the getCurrentSession method because only with this method you have the possibility to be sure that the session will be closed from hibernate Configuration J2EE Current Session. If you use the openSession method, you must close the sessions by yourself. After i begin to work with hibernate i thought it does'n matter which method I use because ...


8

ServiceRegistry interface is related to concept of services (that is new for Hibernate 4). Services are classes that provide Hibernate with various functionality and for which user can plug in alternate implementations. See this wiki page for details. You are right that method buildSessionFactory() is deprecated in Hibernate's Configuration class in favor ...


7

Use getObject(), after calling afterPropertiesSet(): sessionFactoryBean.afterPropertiesSet(); SessionFactory sessionFactory = sessionFactoryBean.getObject(); (AnnotationSessionFactoryBean implements FactoryBean<SessionFactory>) Be careful, though: by doing this, it becomes your responsibility to make sure the SessionFactory is closed when you're ...


7

public class TestHB4 { private static StandardServiceRegistry serviceRegistry; private static SessionFactory sessionFactory; public static void main(String[] args) { Person person = new Person(); person.setFirstName("Namal"); person.setLastName("Dinesh"); Configuration configuration = new ...


7

I think for 4.3 it's now: Configuration configuration=new Configuration() .configure(); // configures settings from hibernate.cfg.xml StandardServiceRegistryBuilder serviceRegistryBuilder = new StandardServiceRegistryBuilder(); // If you miss the below line then it will complaing about a missing dialect setting ...


6

Did you declare sessionFactory bean? <bean id="sessionFactory" class="org.springframework.orm.hibernate3.LocalSessionFactoryBean"> <property name="configLocation"> <value>file:src/hibernate.cfg.xml</value> </property> </bean>


6

Is there something wrong with getting a list? :) Even if you know there is only 1 hibernate cannot assume that. Getting a list is safer anyway! public Weather getCurrentWeather() { List<Weather> list = sessionFactory.getCurrentSession().createQuery("from Weather where id = 1").list(); // here should be something else than list() return ...


6

I prefer the JPA2 EntityManager API over SessionFactory, because it feels more modern. One simple example: JPA: @PersistenceContext EntityManager entityManager; public List<MyEntity> findSomeApples() { return entityManager .createQuery(MyEntity.class, "from MyEntity where apples=7") .getResultList(); } SessionFactory: @Autowired ...


5

To answer your question directly, your ISessionFactory object should be a singleton. You can either do this programmatically (i.e. by wrapping it in a C# singleton) or by configuring it in your IoC container. As for sessions, Burrow looks good but the prodominant and simplest pattern for sessions in web applications - OpenSessionInView - comes ...


5

Support for Hibernate 2 was removed from Spring some time ago. With Spring 2.0, Hibernate 2 support was an optional extension, and Spring 2.5 and above supports only Hibernate 3. When Hibernate went from v2 to v3, the package naming changed from net.sf.hibernate to org.hibernate. Spring's TopLink SessionFactory has nothing whatsoever to do with Hibernate, ...


5

The usual approach is to create a mutex (probably in your public method) that only allows single access. See http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.threading.mutex.aspx Not tested as compiling, but something like: private static Mutex _sessionMutex = new Mutex(); public static ISession OpenSession() { ISession session; ...



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