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82

Yes there is, it is in <algorithm> and is called: std::set_difference. The usage is: #include <algorithm> #include <set> #include <iterator> // ... std::set<int> s1, s2; // Fill in s1 and s2 with values std::set<int> result; std::set_difference(s1.begin(), s1.end(), s2.begin(), s2.end(), std::inserter(result, ...


48

The comm command does that.


27

The - operator applied to two arrays a and b gives the relative complement of b in a (items that are in a but not in b). What you are looking for is the symmetric difference of two sets (the union of both relative complements between the two). This will do the trick: a = [1, 2, 9] b = [1, 2, 3] a - b | b - a # => [3, 9] If you are operating ...


26

To perform result1 - result2, you can join result1 with result2, and only output items that exist in result1. For example: SELECT DISTINCT result1.column FROM result1 LEFT JOIN result2 ON result1.column = result2.column WHERE result2.column IS NULL Note that is not a set difference, and won't output items in result2 that don't exist in result1. It's set ...


21

if don't know if this is most effective, but perhaps the shortest A = [1, 2, 3, 4]; B = [1, 3, 4, 7]; diff = A.filter(function(x) { return B.indexOf(x) < 0 })


14

It looks to me like you need Enumerable.Except(): var differences = list1.Except(list2); And then you can loop through the differences: foreach(var difference in differences) { // work with each individual string here. }


14

Python 2.7: >>> d = {1:2, 2:3, 3:4} >>> d2 = {2:20, 3:30} >>> set(d)-set(d2) set([1]) Python 3.2: >>> d = {1:2, 2:3, 3:4} >>> d2 = {2:20, 3:30} >>> d.keys()-d2.keys() {1}


9

It's because v.begin() is the beginning of an empty sequence. The elements get copied to pretty much anywhere. Replace it with std::back_inserter(v). That will give you an iterator that knows how to insert into v.


9

How about google guava?: Maps.difference(map1,map2)


9

Use ISMEMBER: %# find rows in A that are also in B commonRows = ismember(A,B,'rows'); %# remove those rows A(commonRows,:) = [];


8

You can use an object as a map to avoid linearly scanning B for each element of A as in user187291's answer: function setMinus(A, B) { var map = {}, C = []; for(var i = B.length; i--; ) map[B[i].toSource()] = null; // any other value would do for(var i = A.length; i--; ) { if(!map.hasOwnProperty(A[i].toSource())) ...


8

Yes, there is a set_difference function in the algorithms header. Edits: FYI, the set data structure is able to efficiently use that algorithm, as stated in its documentation. The algorithm also works not just on sets but on any pair of iterators over sorted collections. As others have mentioned, this is an external algorithm, not a method. Presumably ...


6

Somebody showed me how to do exactly this in sh a couple months ago, and then I couldn't find it for a while... and while looking I stumbled onto your question. Here it is: set_union () { cat $1 $2 | sort | uniq } set_difference () { cat $1 $2 $2 | sort | uniq -u }


6

This does indeed exists, it's called the edit distance. The basic algorithm doesn't remember the kind of edits, but it's easily modified. One type of edit distance is the Levenshtein distance. This wikipedia page contains some code snippets you may find useful. Hirschberg's algorithm may also be useful.


5

You need to supply an output iterator that will insert. Try using std::inserter. std::list<int> a { 10, 10, 10, 11, 11, 11, 12, 12, 12, 13 }; std::list<int> b { 10 }; std::list<int> diff; std::set_difference(a.begin(), a.end(), b.begin(), b.end(), std::inserter(diff, diff.begin()));


5

There is a set-difference function in the Common Lisp extensions: elisp> (require 'cl) cl elisp> (set-difference '(1 2 3) '(2 3 4)) (1)


5

Internally the enumerable Except extension method uses Set<T> to perform the computation. It's going to be as least as fast as any other method. Go with list1.Except(list2). It'll give you the best performance and the simplest code.


5

If the elements in your array are unique, you could create a java.util.Set and do a removeAl(...). If they're not unique, go for a java.util.List instead.


4

The first thing that came in my mind is: diff nodes_to_delete nodes_to_keep | grep '<' I've answered before your edit, so I don't think this might still apply if you found the db way to be slow...


4

If you've written your own copy function that the compiler can see in the same scope as std::copy and it's a possible candidate, then sure that would cause an ambiguity. There's no magic flag you can set to make it use std::copy, but I think if you put your own copy in a namespace and don't using that namespace, the compiler won't be able to find it and ...


4

Try this: SELECT tableExcel.ID FROM tableExcel WHERE tableExcel.ID NOT IN(SELECT anotherTable.ID FROM anotherTable) Here's an SQL Fiddle to try this: sqlfiddle.com/#!6/31af5/14


4

Common Lisp uses EQL as default test. You want string-equal or similar. CL-USER > (set-difference '("cat" "dog" "tiger" "bear") '("cat" "dog" "tiger") :test #'string-equal) -> ("bear")


3

Rather than doing lots of searching through List structures (which is quite slow) you can put the all of the checksums into a HashSet which can be much more efficiently searched. private List<MyFile> Diff(Node index1, Node index2) { var Index1Files = FindFiles(index1); var Index2Files = FindFiles(index2); //this is all of the files in ...


3

You're probably looking for EXCEPT: SELECT Value FROM @Excel EXCEPT SELECT Value FROM @Table; Edit: Except will treat NULL differently(NULL values are matching) apply DISTINCT unlike NOT IN Here's your sample data: declare @Excel Table(Value int); INSERT INTO @Excel VALUES(1); INSERT INTO @Excel VALUES(2); INSERT INTO @Excel VALUES(3); ...


3

How about just modifying words by removing all the delimiters? words = collections.Counter(s.split()) for delim in delims: del words[delim]


3

Maybe [x for x in dict1.keys() if x not in dict2.keys()]


3

This should work, but is currently broken in 1.6.1 due to an unavailable mergesort for the view being created. It works in the pre-release 1.7.0 version. This should be the fastest way possible, since the views don't have to copy any memory: >>> import numpy as np >>> a1 = np.array([[1,2,3],[4,5,6],[7,8,9]]) >>> a2 = ...


3

The obvious way to do this is like this: select a, b, c, value from tab where tab.state = 'A' and not exists ( select 1 -- let the optimizer do its thing from tab ti where tab.state = 'B' and ti.a=tab.a and ti.b=tab.b and ti.c=tab.c) I would even add a distinct in the outer query if the data can have doubles.


3

Simply put, it takes two lists, goes through the second and for each item, removes the first instance of the same item from the first list. > [1..10] \\ [2, 3, 5, 8] [1,4,6,7,9,10] > [1, 2, 1, 2, 1, 2] \\ [2] [1,1,2,1,2] > [1, 2, 1, 2, 1, 2] \\ [2, 2] [1,1,1,2] > [1, 2, 1, 2, 1, 2] \\ [2, 2, 1] [1,1,2]


3

The (\\) operator (and the difference function) implements set difference, so, if you have two lists, a and b, it returns only those elements of a that are not in b, as illustrated:



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