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119

I'm going to assume any readers of this question to have read both: Zero Piraeus' answer and My explanation of CPython's dictionaries. The first thing to note is that hash randomization is decided on interpreter start-up. The hash of each letter will be the same for both sets, so the only thing that can matter is if there is a collision (where order ...


61

At first glance, it appears that x should always equal y, because two sets constructed from the same elements are always equal: >>> x = set([1, "a", "b", "c", "z", "f"]) >>> y = set(["a", "b", "c", "z", "f", 1]) >>> x {1, 'z', 'a', 'b', 'c', 'f'} >>> y {1, 'z', 'a', 'b', 'c', 'f'} >>> x == y True However, it is ...


28

First off, its important to understand, that there is no single standard h.264 elementary bitstream format. The specification document does contain an annex, specifically annex b, that describes one possible format, but it is not an actual requirement. The standard specifies how video is encoded into individual packets. How these packets are stored and ...


26

You are almost certainly generating duplicate Person objects. In your comment, you said each person is randomly generated from sex, first names and last names from a text file containing "hundreds" of names, and age. Let's say there are two possibilities for sex, 300 possibilities for each of first name and last name, and 100 possible values of age. That's ...


16

It is implemented, but you need to use a hashable type instead. frozenset() is that type. The documentation even tells you so: To represent sets of sets, the inner sets must be frozenset objects. Demo: >>> {2, frozenset([3, 4])} set([frozenset([3, 4]), 2]) This is because a regular set() is mutable, which is incompatible with the ...


16

This is more a response to Python 3.41 A set before it was closed as a duplicate. The others are right: don't rely on the order. Don't even pretend there is one. That said, there is one thing you can rely on: list(myset) == list(myset) That is, the order is stable. Understanding why there is a perceived order requires understanding a few things: ...


14

Using a custom allocator seems a way to reduce the amount of time spent for building and releasing a std::set<...>. Below is a complete demo of a simple allocator together with a program profiling the resulting times. #include <algorithm> #include <chrono> #include <cstdlib> #include <iostream> #include <iterator> ...


13

You are using lists and tuples, not sets. Use {...} for set literals: >>> {6, 7, 8, 16, 18} <= {6, 8, 11, 13, 17} False or use set([...]) or frozenset([...]). Set literal syntax is only available in Python 2.7 and 3.x. Lists and tuples don't support set operations. Instead, <, <=, > and >= comparisons follow lexicographical ...


13

There are two things at play here. Sets are unordered. set([1, "a", "b", "c", "z", "f"])) == set(["a", "b", "c", "z", "f", 1]) When you convert a set to a tuple via the tuple constructor it essentially iterates over the set and adds each element returned by the iteration . The constructor syntax for tuples is tuple(iterable) -> tuple initialized from ...


11

You'd basically have to convert it to a pair of methods: public Unit[] getUnits() { // Method body } public void setUnits(Unit[] value) { // Method body } Java doesn't have properties at a language level - the above is basically just a (very common) convention. I should note, by the way, that this C# code really isn't terribly nice: There are ...


10

('name') is not a tuple. It's just the expression 'name', parenthesized. A one-element tuple is written ('name',); a one-element list ['name'] is prettier and works too. In Python 2.7, 3.x you can also write {'name'} to construct a set.


10

When using s.__contains__(i) you need to do the attribute lookup in Python, as well as make a method call in Python. These are executed as separate bytecodes: >>> import dis >>> dis.dis(compile('s.__contains__(i)', '<>', 'exec')) 1 0 LOAD_NAME 0 (s) 3 LOAD_ATTR 1 (__contains__) ...


10

Yes, it is perfectly fine to add elements and remove elements to a set while iterating it. This use case was considered and is supported in JavaScript 2015 (ES6). It will leave it in a consistent state. Note this also applies to itearting with forEach. Intuitively: The set iteration algorithm basically looks something like this: Set position to 0 While ...


9

This depends on the implementation of a set. C++ An std::set in C++ is typically implemented as a red-black tree and guarantees an insert complexity of O(log(n)) (source). std::set is an associative container that contains a sorted set of unique objects of type Key. Sorting is done using the key comparison function Compare. Search, removal, and ...


9

convert into Vector and get random element from it scala> val fruits = Set("apple", "grape", "pear", "banana") fruits: scala.collection.immutable.Set[String] = Set(apple, grape, pear, banana) scala> import scala.util.Random import scala.util.Random scala> val rnd=new Random rnd: scala.util.Random = scala.util.Random@31a9253 scala> ...


9

What's mutable is not the Set, is the reference to it. a += "Colleen" returns a new immutable set, assigned to the mutable variable a Scala performs a syntactic transformation, turning the expression into a = a + "Colleen" in case += is not defined (as in the case of an immutable Set) Clearly += doesn't make sense when a is a val, since you cannot ...


8

Just because if someone doesn't read the comments, the answer is... DON'T PUT SPACES AROUND THE EQUALS SIGN! SET TESTVAR="No Value"


8

Using custom allocator with std::set can be helpful. If you know the number of elements before constructing the set, you can allocate a raw memory buffer with appropriate size and then override allocate method in your custom allocator class(using std::allocator as a base class) so that it returns a pointer to an address in the buffer instead of calling new ...


8

This is a coincidence. The data is neither sorted nor does __str__ sort. The hash values for integers equal their value (except for -1 and long integers outside the sys.maxint range), which increases the chance that integers are slotted in order, but that's not a given. set uses a hash table to track items contained, and ordering depends on the hash ...


8

Just subtract the intersection from the union: In [1]: a = set([1, 2, 3]) In [2]: b = set([2, 4, 5]) In [3]: c = set([3, 2, 6]) In [4]: (a | b | c) - (a & b & c) Out[4]: set([1, 3, 4, 5, 6]) Or, to generalise to an arbitrary collection of sets: In [10]: l = [a, b, c] In [11]: reduce(set.union, l) - reduce(set.intersection, l) Out[11]: set([1, ...


8

You can use the in operator to see if it is in the list a = [{'a': '1'}, {'c': '2'}] b = [{'a': '1'}, {'b': '2'}] >>> {'a':'1'} in a True >>> {'a':'1'} in b True >>> [i for i in a if i not in b] [{'c': '2'}]


8

Your answer was correct David, but it was a little misleading because the parameter equaling NULL does not make it optional; it just has to be set to any value period. This also creates optional parameters: CREATE PROCEDURE [dbo].[dcspFilterEmpList] @ProductName nvarchar(200) = 'DefaultProduct', @ProductGroupID int = 1 AS Which could thus be ...


8

Here's one way > all(second %in% first) [1] TRUE


8

Java 8: String[] stArr = {"eins", "zwei", "drei", "bier"}; Set<String> strSet = Arrays.stream(strArr).collect(Collectors.toSet()); System.out.println(strSet); //[eins, vier, zwei, drei]


7

Finally, I have found a solution and it's a simple one: document.getElementById("texens").value = "tinkumaster"; Works like a charm. No clue why jQuery does not fall back to this.


7

The best way is to invert the condition, as suggested by Jonathon Reinhart import collections print [x for x, y in collections.Counter(myList).iteritems() if y == 1] # [6, 211, -8] Note: This method will not be able to maintain the order of elements. For example, when myList = [1, 1000, 10] the result is [1000, 1, 10] Because collections.Counter is ...


7

You can very easily do it as: len(set(tup))==len(tup) This creates a set of tup and checks if it is the same length as the original tup. The only case in which they would have the same length is if all elements in tup were unique Examples >>> a = (1,2,3) >>> print len(set(a))==len(a) True >>> b = (1,2,2) >>> print ...


7

This is because when you call: set(sorted(A)) you are sorting the original full list and then filtering out the duplicate values. However, when you call: sorted(set(A)) you are first shortening the list by removing duplicate values using set and then sorting the much smaller list hence the shorter time. Hope that makes sense. For Example >>> ...


7

There is a shuffle method in the List class. You can call it without an argument or provide a random number generator instance: var list = ['a', 'b', 'c', 'd']; list.shuffle(); print('$list');


7

Yes you can use the Standard Library. Use std::search to perform a range search : vector<string> v1 = {"A","B","C"}; vector<string> v2 = {"X","Y","A","B","C","D"}; auto res = search(begin(v2), end(v2), begin(v1), end(v1)); And test if the range was found : auto found = res != end(v2); Live example here.



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