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0

If sum of all numbers is limited by reliable value, then DP solution exists with complexity O(N * MaxSum), else there are O(2^N) possible sums. DP solution (Delphi): procedure GenerateAllSums(const A: array of Integer); var ASums: array of Boolean; S, i, j: Integer; begin //find maximal possible sum S := 0; for i := 0 to High(A) do S := S + ...


4

Sums from subsets are in direct correspondence with subsets, which are also in direct correspondence with binary sequences. If you have five items in your set, you want to iterate over all bit sequences from 00000 to 11111. Equivalently, you want to iterate from 0 to 2^5-1. If a bit is set to one, you should include the value in the sum. So, something like ...


4

If you just need all possible sums then you can use this function. public static IEnumerable<int> GetSums(List<int> list) { return from m in Enumerable.Range(0, 1 << list.Count) select (from i in Enumerable.Range(0, list.Count) where (m & (1 << i)) != 0 select ...


0

You have two broad strategies here, I expect both wont give great performance (but that might not be a problem for your use). Have your set register with the objects for changes. Instead of modifying the set constantly, only update it when it is used. Note that these solutions will have a slight difference in behavior. Register for changes This ...


1

This is really bad design, but what you asked for: def do_string(a, b, c, op_string): return eval(op_string) a = set([1,2,3]) b = set([4,5,6]) c = set([3,4]) print(do_string(a, b, c, "(a|b)^c")) # => {1, 2, 5, 6} # be aware! arguments are passed POSITIONALLY, not by name! print(do_string(b, c, a, "(a|b)^c")) # => {1, 2, 4, 5, 6} !not what ...


0

To make it a bit clearer if you are just in need of a two state button: You do not need your own button.xml. You can work with the normal of Android. The button.setPressed(true) will not work if you are clicking the button, because Android will reset it once you let go of the button. Try to set another buttons setPressed state first to see the effect. ...


-2

Create a new set S and then iterate over the elements in C, adding each element to S if it is not in D. Return S.


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Set<> pks... String s = "SELECT m FROM Membership m WHERE m.id IN :ids"; TypedQuery<Membership> q = em.createQuery(s,Membership.class); q.setParameter("ids",pks); List<Membrship> result = q.getResultList()


3

As was pointed out in the comments, you are not finding an intersection rather you are finding if a single entity of original is present in target. That being said, your first example is O(N) because the range is O(N) and the map lookup is O(1). Your second example is O(N^2) because of the nested range loops. Without any benchmarking I can tell you the ...


1

Ugly ancient object.... for(String property : m_Properties.stringPropertyNames()) { newProperties.put(property, m_properties.getProperty(property)); }


0

I suggest you have a Map<String,Set<Integer>> where the key of the map is the name of the set. When you get a word, create a new Set to add numbers to, when you get a number, add it to the set.


1

Testing if one set contains another can be done with comparison operator or with .issuperset >>> set([2, 3, 4]) >= set([2, 3]) True >>> set([2, 3, 4]).issuperset(set([2, 3])) True See 8.7. sets — Unordered collections of unique elements


3

You are testing if set(b) contains the literal set object. set(b) doesn't contain such an object. If you want to test if set(a) is a subset or equal, use <=: >>> set(a) <= set(b) True or use the set.issubset() method: >>> set(a).issubset(b) True Either option also returns True for smaller sets where all elements are also ...


1

The set doesn't contain a set(2, 3, 4), it contains integers, 2, 3, and 4. You could ask whether individual integers are in the set: >>> 2 in set(b) True >>> 3 in set(b) True >>> 4 in set(b) True The documentation for set shows to check for containment you can do it two ways: >>> set(a) <= set(b) True or ...


0

You cannot directly. You can use the magic Boost.MultiIndex as suggested by Wintermute, or do it by hand. That means, as you are interested in set, vector, or list, these are all sorted container, and you can sort it according to your primary order. Then, you generate a secondary index sorted according to your secondary order. You can use any container, for ...


0

Edit: sorry, I did not read the question properly. Basically once a container is created, the sorting order is hard-coded into it. The only way is to use another container or these magic boost containers that are taylor made to support that.


0

You can't do this directly with the sorted containers from STL like std::set. The comparison function object is set when defining the container and can't be changed afterward. To solve this you can either use containers that support this directly (like the ones from Boost that Wintermute mentioned) or use a sequence container like vector or list and ...


1

You're not storing a set of strictly strings, you're storing a set of both strings and integers. You don't know which one you're going to put in next, but you don't necessarily care about that; you're just leveraging the set properties for your use case. What you can do instead of just create a set that stores most any object in it. Set<?> set = new ...


0

Currently, you are using a set of strings to store your data. Since it is a set of Strings, the set will allow any elements that are unequal strings. Wouldn't it be confusing if you were writing a different application, where you really needed string equality, if "1".equals("1.000")==true? In this case, I think it would be better not to use a set at all... ...


3

You seem to have rules that your code doesn't respect. You say 1.0 is a "double". Is there a rule that determines under which conditions the code is a double? For example, is "1e10" a double -- 1 x 10^10? Or is it a string like "yes" presumably is? 1.0 and 1 are different strings. If you have some comparison rule that makes these two things identical, ...


0

You are not trying to make a set of characters. You are trying to make a set of strings, which is totally different. In C, a string is a pointer to the first character in a 0-terminated sequence of characters, which is a complicated way of saying that in C, a string is a pointer. And two pointers are equal if and only if they point to the same address; two ...


1

I think the problem is with the way you define "a merge." If "a merge" actually means [ A_i <- A_i union A_j ] and [ A_j <- {} ], then the correct answer seems to be 99. That is because each time you perform a merge, then you empty one of the A_k sets and it can no longer participate in any future merges. Since you have 100 non-empty sets to begin ...


1

A is not a proper subset of B because A contains members that B does not — x and y. A would be a proper subset if it were {{x, y}}.


1

HOL types cannot depend on values. So if you want to define a quotient type for an arbitrary non-empty set S and equivalence relation equiv using quotient_type, the arbitrary part must stay at the meta-level. Thus, S and equiv can either be axiomatized or defined such that you can convince yourself that you really have captured the desired notion of ...


0

how about creating a method that takes two objects as aparameters (1 type a , other type b ) and returns a boolean (match or not) Based on your example classes (members are ref and x , but match if only ref is the same) Example : boolean match (A a , B b){ return (ref.equals(b.ref)); } You could iterate through the lists and compare As and Bs and ...


0

As Martijn Pieters and BrenBarn have mentioned, your __hash__() method doesn't work because of the behaviour of the default __repr__() method. Their answers show alternate implementations of __hash__(); the code below instead implements a simple but useful __repr__(). I'm not claiming that my approach is better than Martijn's or BrenBarn's approach. I'm ...


0

As already stated out dicts and sets are stable and provide the same order as long as you don't change it. If you want a specific order you can use OrderedDict From the collections library docs: >>> from collections import OrderedDict >>> # regular unsorted dictionary >>> d = {'banana': 3, 'apple':4, 'pear': 1, 'orange': 2} ...


5

Python's dicts and sets are stable, that is, if you iterate over them without changing them they are guaranteed to give you the same order. This is from the documentation on dicts: Keys and values are iterated over in an arbitrary order which is non-random, varies across Python implementations, and depends on the dictionary’s history of insertions and ...


3

Iteration over an un-modified set will always give you the same order. The order is informed by the current values and their insertion history. See Why is the order in Python dictionaries and sets arbitrary? if you are interested in why that is. Note that if you want to modify your files in place, then that'll only work if your entries have a fixed size. ...


0

You are hashing the object instead of the value(s). Try to hash self.title+self.answer instead of hashing self


1

The documentation for __hash__ says: The only required property is that objects which compare equal have the same hash value Your class does not meet this requirement. Since you don't override __repr__, repr(self) will use the default behavior, which will give you something like <Question object at 0x00001234>. This means every Question ...


4

Your hash function is grossly ineffective. Python requires that your __hash__ function should return the same value for two objects that are considered equal, but yours doesn't. From the object.__hash__ documentation: The only required property is that objects which compare equal have the same hash value repr(self) returns the default representation, ...


0

Simple helper method (You can use it for Set or any other collection): public static <T> List<T> listOf(final Collection<T> set, final int limit) { final List<T> list = new ArrayList<>(limit); final Iterator<T> i = set.iterator(); for (int j = 0; j < limit && i.hasNext(); j++) { ...


4

Because a list is allowed to have duplicates, so they cannot be treated as a set. There is no formal definition of what intersection, difference, etc would mean if the elements are not unique. For example, what would the difference of this be 'aaabbc' - 'aab' Should you remove them only up to the counts of each unique element? 'abc' Or remove any ...


0

I did it this way: Set<Packet> packets = new TreeSet<Packet>(); for (Cart cart: carts) { SortedSet<Byte> cartTaxes = new TreeSet(cart.getTaxesAllItems()); Packet p = new Packet(); p.setTaxes(cartTaxes); packets.add(p); } I understand that the caching is in the responsibility of the Packet itself. So id modified the ...


0

You should be using a Map to store values you can lookup. Map<Tax, Tax> map = new HashMap<>(); Tax cachedTax = map.putIfAbsent(tax, t -> t); p.setTaxes(cachedTax); This uses Java 8's putIfAbsent, but you can do the same thing in Java 7, with more code. If you are using Java 7 you can do Map<Tax, Tax> map = new HashMap<>(); ...


1

This is not possible with batch files. Batch commands are single-threaded. To run two things simultaneously requires two instances of cmd.exe. But the console subsystem only allows one program to own the console at a time, so if the second instance of cmd is attached to the same console, one of them must be blocked. It is possible to do something like ...


2

It's worth adding that you can make derived helper methods like containsAll available on Set[T] if you want, by using an implicit enriched class. You might also consider making a variadic overload: implicit class RichSet[T](val x: Set[T]) extends AnyVal { def containsAll(y: Set[T]): Boolean = y.subsetOf(x) def containsAll(y: T*): Boolean = ...


2

In Scala, Set is equipped with set operations such as intersect, thus for instance set.intersect(subset) == subset conveys the semantics of containsAll, even that subsetOf as already mentioned proves the most succinct.


7

There is subsetOf, which tests whether or not the elements of a Set are contained within another Set. (Kind of the reverse in terms of the expression) val set = Set(1,2,3,4) val subset = Set(1,2) scala> subset.subsetOf(set) res0: Boolean = true scala> set.subsetOf(subset) res1: Boolean = false


0

The easiest with Java 8 is: outbound.stream().skip(n % outbound.size()).findFirst().get() where n is a random integer. Of course it is of less performance than that with the for(elem: Col)


1

first, you can't hash lists, so instead of a set of lists, we'll have a set of tuples. assuming that your dictionary is named d and your 0/1 list is named mask, your result is simply: res = set(tuple(d[i]) for i, v in enumerate(mask) if v)


0

Sets can not contain unhashable types. Specifically lists. It is common practice to use the immutable tuple type instead: Create result set: >>> result = set() Define the mapping: >>> mapping = {0: [5, 1, 2, 3, 4], 1: [5, 1, 2, 4, 3], 2: [5, 1, 3, 2, 4], 3: [5, 1, 3, 4, 2], 4: [5, 1, 4, 2, 3], 5: [5, 1, 4, 3, 2], 6: [5, 2, 1, 3, 4], 7: ...


0

You can't have a set of lists, as they are unhashable. This is because they are mutable (can change). A close alternative would be a set of tuples. And you should remove duplicates in the input list as well. mapping = {0: [5, 1, 2, 3, 4], 1: [5, 1, 2, 4, 3], 2: [5, 1, 3, 2, 4], 3: [5, 1, 3, 4, 2], 4: [5, 1, 4, 2, 3], 5: [5, 1, 4, 3, 2], 6: [5, 2, 1, 3, 4], ...


0

Keep track of the color your self. For example you have 4 floats holding one component each: GLfloat r,g,b,a; Whenever you want to change the alpha value, set a to desired value and call glColor4f a = 0.5f; glColor4f(r,g,b,a); You can use this exact same solution to change other components individually too


0

have you tried beforeShow function of date picker on textfield. for more detail on beforeShow: beforeShow


0

If duplicate user lines are consecutive; you could use itertools.groupby() to remove duplicates: #!/usr/bin/env python from itertools import groupby from operator import itemgetter def extract_user(line): return line.partition('user')[2].partition('from')[0].strip() with open('live.txt') as file: print(" ".join(map(itemgetter(0), groupby(file, ...


0

You can use flatten function of compiler.ast module to flatten your sub-list and then apply set intersection like this from compiler.ast import flatten A=[['11@N3'], ['23@N0'], ['62@N0'], ['99@N0'], ['47@N7']] B=[['23@N0'], ['12@N1']] a = flatten(A) b = flatten(B) common_elements = list(set(a).intersection(b)) common_elements ['23@N0']


1

Here is the code you want: with open ('live.txt') as file: users = [] for line in file.readlines(): word = line.split() users.append(word[word.index('user') + 1]) unique_users = list(set(users)) print " ".join(unique_users) Output: romero ronda


2

Your datastructure is a bit strange, as it is a list of one-element lists of strings; you'd want to reduce it to a list of strings, then you can apply the previous solutions: Thus a list like: B = [['23@N0'], ['12@N1']] can be converted to iterator that iterates over '23@N0', '12@N1' with itertools.chain(*), thus we have simple oneliner: >>> ...



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