Hot answers tagged

4

var element = document.getElementById('username'); element.classList.add('error'); window.setTimeout(function () { element.classList.remove('error'); }, 2000); #username { width: 100%; height: 50px; line-height: 50px; color: white; background-color: green; text-align: center; transition: background-color .25s linear; } ...


4

It's no longer a recursive call. The setTimeout is a callback in the future and that call would be at the "top of the stack". The existing call to your function sets up this callback and then finishes its execution, resulting in zero recursion.


3

this is the right way to do it : list = [1000,2000,3000,4000]; for (var i = 0; i < 4; i++) { setTimeout(function(){console.log('Hello')}, list[i]);} because setTimeout accepts a callback function not an instruction


2

To correctly delay the execution of finishedGame() you should wrap the function call, not call the function. Try this: setTimeout(function () { finishedGame(winner, winnerInfo) }, 20000); setTimeout: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/WindowTimers/setTimeout


2

You can set a timeout and cancel it if the function is called before the time limit is reached. var timeout = setTimeout(function() { runCode(); }, 5000); function runCode() { clearTimeout(timeout); ... } Edit: Now that I think of it, a better way to set the timeout in this instance would be var timeout = setTimeout(runCode, 5000);


2

You could use this variant of your last function, which calls it recursively from the callback function you pass: function generalizeCallBack(arrayOfFunctions){ if (!arrayOfFunctions.length) return; // nothing to do var func = arrayOfFunctions.shift(); // extract function to execute func("1","2", function(we){ alert(we); ...


2

The issue is caused by most mobile browsers, which block videos and sounds from being played without user interaction (loading them may result in extra costs for the user, depending on their data contract). So you can't use new Audio() after a setTimeout. What you can do, however, after at least one user interaction, is replace the src of an audio element ...


2

It looks like you are trying to add timeout 1 second before adding the click listener, but as @Moob said, it doesn't make sense. If you want the delay to happen after the click, this code will work: $(document).ready(function() { $(".about_us").click(function() { setTimeout(function() { var o = $(".hidden"); o.hasClass("visible") ? ...


2

Since htmlGenerator may be async or sync, it will be a good idea to use Promise. Specifically Promise.race(). var engine = { setHtml:function(){ var called = false; var p1 = new Promise(function(resolve){ htmlGenerator(function(){ resolve(true) }); } //if htmlGenerator takes 5 or ...


2

Using jquery and setTimeout function: var $elm = $("#username").addClass("error"); setTimeout(function() { $elm.removeClass("error"); }, 2000); .error{ color:red; } <script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script> <div id="username">USER NAME</div>


1

The problem you describe will occur when htmlGenerator() is processed synchronously. In this case the htmlGenerator, and therefore callback(), will be executed before the setTimeout is called, so you call clearTimeout on null. This means no timer is cleared. You then start the timer as soon as htmlGenerator completes, hence skip is always called. To fix ...


1

setTimeout will only be called once . You should use setInterval for infinite repetitions . setInterval(myTimeout , 500)


1

If you refresh while the timer is running it will start all over again when the page reloads. So to answer your question, yes the get_details() function will be called after the refresh but only after the full 3 minutes has elapsed since the refresh occurred.


1

Turns out (with help from the commentators above) that the function makeEditable was called more than once. Adding the following two lines of code at the beginning of the function fixed the issue: //if element is already editable - ignore if(elem.attr("contentEditable") === "true") return;


1

window.location.reload() entirely reloads the page, which breaks any javascript invocation. You can still have a bit of code running by listening the onunload event, but don't expect code to persist between sessions (or you have to serialize data in cookies or localStorage beforehand)


1

You can "stack" the setTimeout calls if you want. Just remember that they are called immediately and only take action after the given millisecond argument. So if I want three callbacks to take place within 200 milliseconds of each other, using 200 as the argument is incorrect. The first one should be 200, and then 400, and then 600 - or to break it out i * ...


1

The problem is that you're executing the code in your setTimeout calls immediately. You're effectively saying "execute the result of setting the icon.style.top = whatever in 500 milliseconds" ... which does nothing. Try this instead: icon.style.top = top-20 + "px"; setTimeout ( function() { icon.style.top = top + "px"; }, 500) ; ... and I just blew 15 ...


1

Instead of setTimeout, you can use a setInterval. It is like a loop with a delay between iterations. For example, with a delay of 1 second: var node_loop = setInterval(function(){ // Draw a node }, 1000); To stop the loop: clearInterval(node_loop); More info: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/WindowTimers/setInterval


1

You are calling console.log() immediately and passing the return value as the argument to setTimeout. You should be passing a function. The bind() method will return a new function that calls log with the correct context and the arguments you specify. setTimeout(console.log.bind(console, 'Hello'), list[i]);



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible