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1

It looks like your just trying to encrypt a string with SHA1 correct? Java has packages for this already without having to use OpenSSL. Take a look at the following function for example: public static byte[] encrypt(String x) throws Exception { java.security.MessageDigest digest = null; digest = ...


0

This is because the SHA-1 fingerprint is generated by the keystore used to sign the builds. The default debug keystore located in the android home directory is different on every computer. You can either add the fingerprints from all the the debug keystores you are using or share the same keystore file. Sharing the same keystore can be easily be done by ...


0

Hashes are one way, you can go from text to hash but not the other way. Have a look at this for a nice discussion: http://security.stackexchange.com/questions/11717/why-are-hash-functions-one-way-if-i-know-the-algorithm-why-cant-i-calculate-t


0

You are confusing hashing with encryption (this is what you would probably want to use instead). Encryption is reversible given a key, while hashing is not.


2

The whole point of SHA-1 and other hashing algorithms is that there is no such thing as unhashing. There is no such method in Java or any other language. What you are searching for is symmetric encryption.


0

I am not familiar with Bouncy Castle, but you can work out the HMAC-SHA1 without external libraries using only what is provided with Java SE: import java.security.NoSuchAlgorithmException; import javax.crypto.Mac; import javax.crypto.spec.SecretKeySpec; public String getHmacSha1(byte[] key, byte[] input) throws NoSuchAlgorithmException { SecretKeySpec ...


0

What would be the probability for a collision as a result of a XOR between the first 64 bits and the last 64 bits?


0

Microsoft introduced a new cryptography API called CNG (Cryptography API: Next Generation) in Windows Vista and Windows Server 2008. The software you're trying to use is making use of the .NET SHA1Cng class which is implemented using CNG. Therefore it won't run on Windows Server 2003. Given that extended support ends for Windows Server 2003 on the 14th of ...


1

I have many errors on line where is StringSink This line with the StringSink looks OK to me. You should provide the exact error that you are encountering. Error on line with StringSink is: undefined reference to `CryptoPP::StringSinkTemplate::StringSinkTemplate(std::string&)' Based on the additional information you provided, see Building ...


0

For Windows you have to create it using command prompt.First go to your java bin directory via the cmd like C:\Program Files\Java\jdk1.7.0_71\bin,then type keytool -list -v -keystore c:\users\your_user_name\.android\debug.keystore -alias androiddebugkey -storepass android -keypass android For Mac users go to terminal ,then type keytool -list -v -keystore ...


0

I think that you miss google play services. You need to have it in order to use Google Maps API v.2 You can get it from here or here.


0

I think you generated SHA fingerprint key from machine A and compiled your android project in machine B. That's one of reason you may get blank screen. Please build your android project in machine A.


0

Thanks to everyone's comments I solved the problem. I am posting the code here, so others might find it beneficial. void getFileHash(char *fileName){ unsigned char result[2*SHA_DIGEST_LENGTH]; unsigned char hash[SHA_DIGEST_LENGTH]; int i; FILE *f = fopen(fileName,"rb"); SHA_CTX mdContent; int bytes; unsigned char data[1024]; if(f == NULL){ printf("%s ...


0

Did you implement the map in xml code like this: <fragment android:id="@+id/map" android:name="com.google.android.gms.maps.MapFragment" android:layout_width="match_parent" android:layout_height="match_parent" /> also implement map in java? GoogleMap googleMap = ((MapFragment) ...


1

You need to read the file chunk by chunk, and compute the digest chunk by chunk. Read chunks up to e.g. 2048 bytes with fread. Use SHA1_Init in the beginning, SHA1_Update for each chunk, and SHA1_Final in the end. You can use plain SHA1 function if you read the entire file in one gulp, but this is not recommended. Another method is to memory-map the file ...


0

You need just give argument of file context to SHA1(). The variable fileName contains string "/bin/ls" and SHA1() function returns hash of that string. Here is simple example how to read file and get hash /* Used variables */ FILE *fp; char string[2048]; unsigned char hash[SHA_DIGEST_LENGTH]; int t; /* Open file */ ...


0

I don't know how your SHA1() function works (is it from libssl?), but I assume that by SHA1((unsigned char *)fileName, strlen(fileName),hash); you are hashing file name, so /bin/ls string. You need to read file content byte by byte into a buffer and hash it.


0

You can persist the MD5 Hashes of your file, and later, check if have some difference. To persist some memory in your program (in a way that you can reboot your machine without lost), you can use several techniques, and the best one depends on how you want to use this memory later. Some choices and how to implement: Store in some txt File -> You can use ...


0

Salts are great when you are storing lots of passwords, otherwise they are fairly useless since they are stored in plaintext. If an attacker manages to get your hashed passwords, then assume that they can get their hands on your salts. Use SHA-256 because it's a cryptographically strong hash function, and use salts. But most importantly, just use strong ...


2

It could help prevent a timing attack. String comparisons will return false on the first character that's different. So the longer a comparison takes, the more characters in the beginning of the string match. An attacker could try to guess the first character, then the next character, and so on. Granted, such an attack would not be easy. But if latencies ...


0

Here's a full compilable example that uses only libtomcrypt without any dynamic memory allocation and successfully computes the reference example from RFC6455: //This file is licensed under CC0 1.0 Universal (public domain) //Compile like this: gcc -o wsencodetest wsencodetest.c -ltomcrypt #include <stdio.h> #include <string.h> #include ...


0

Using M2Crypto, the above answers does not work. Here is a tested example. import base64 import hashlib import M2Crypto as m2 # detach the signature from the message if it's required in it (useful for url encoded data) message_without_sign = message.split("&SIGN=")[0] # decode base64 the signature binary_signature = base64.b64decode(signature) # create ...


4

SCRAM-SHA-1 The basic overview of how this mechanism works is: The client sends the username it wants to authenticate as. The server sends back the salt for that user and the number of iterations (either by generating them or looking them up in its database for the given username). The client hashes the password with the given salt for the given number of ...


2

Here is the MD5 code inserted in an Excel Module with the name "module_md5": Private Const BITS_TO_A_BYTE = 8 Private Const BYTES_TO_A_WORD = 4 Private Const BITS_TO_A_WORD = 32 Private m_lOnBits(30) Private m_l2Power(30) Sub SetUpArrays() m_lOnBits(0) = CLng(1) m_lOnBits(1) = CLng(3) m_lOnBits(2) = CLng(7) ...


0

Check your locally-installed certificates (on Windows, 'certmgr.msc'). You may have an old SHA-1-signed copy of the StartCom intermediate certificate which is still valid (say, to 2017) and being used in preference to that provided by the server.


1

As SQLite does not implement any sha1 function by default, you would have to move the password hashing from the SQL query to your code. Meaning your query should be : cmd.CommandText = "Select * from accounts where (username=@username and password=@password);"; and you should pass the password like this : cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@password", ...



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