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0

This answer is slightly speculative, but based on the symptoms, and the code you posted, I suspect a precision problem. The rendering code you linked, looks like this in a shortened form: useShader(FWD_AMBIENT); part.render(); glDepthMask(GL_FALSE); glDepthFunc(GL_EQUAL); for (Light light : lights) { useShader(light.getShaderType()); part.render(); ...


0

One thing I've noticed looking at your lighting vertex shader code: void main() { gl_Position = projectionMatrix * vec4(position, 1.0); texCoord0 = texCoord; normal0 = (normalMatrix * vec4(normal, 0)).xyz; modelViewPos0 = (modelViewMatrix * vec4(position, 1)).xyz; } You are applying the projection matrix directly to the vertex position, ...


2

You are asking two different things here, as I can see. One thing is what you will model, in whatever 3d modeling software you choose. There you will build your model from scratch, define forms, colors, textures and whatever you need. Note that here you will be using the shaders from the 3D sofware. Once you model is done, you'll export it and import on ...


0

You can first sampling the original texture, if the color is white, then sampling the gradient texture. uniform sampler2D Texture0; // original texture uniform sampler2D Texture1; // gradient texture varying vec2 texCoord; void main(void) { gl_FragColor = texture2D( Texture0, texCoord ); // If the color in original texture is white // use the ...


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One way for doing this would be to organize the textures in something called a texture atlas. Instead of passing that index, pass a vec2, with the offsets already calculated. For the resizing thing, you can look at the particle shader in three.js. You need to apply perspective shortening to the pointSize.


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I solve this problem; after main(){} I shouldn't use ';' and other syntax errors too. in fragment shader, I have to declare vColor with operator 'varying', just like vertex shader. In fragment shader; from GLSL Reference; varying is equal to in operator.


3

Based on what I found after some quick searching on GPU history, vertex shaders were introduced with DirectX 8.0, with GPUs supporting it being released around late 2000 or early 2001. Sometimes GPUs with older architectures keep being sold for some time longer at the low end of the price scale. But pretty much any desktop GPU sold within at least the last ...


2

Don't call glGetUniformLocation every time you need to set a uniform's value. Uniform locations don't change for a given shader (unless you recompile it), so look up the uniforms once after compiling the shader and save the location values for use in your Render function.


4

Certainly. For example if your attribute is a vec4, and the attribute location is attrLoc, you can use one of the following to set an attribute value that applies to the whole draw call: glVertexAttrib4f(attrLoc, 1.0f, 2.0f, 3.0f, 4.0f); glDrawArrays(...); GLfloat attrVal[4] = {1.0f, 2.0f, 3.0f, 4.0f}; glVertexAttrib4fv(attrLoc, attrVal); ...


0

Hue/Saturation/Brightness/Contrast HLSL pixel shader (shazzam .fx) /// <class>7Aliens HSBC Hue/Saturation/Brightness/Contrast</class> /// <description>Blend modes Brightness/Contrast (Photoshop CS) with Hue and Saturation.</description> sampler2D input : register(s0); /// <summary>The brightness offset.</summary> /// ...


2

A) normals.reserve(indices.size()); uvs.reserve(indices.size()); do not alter the size but just capacity (try yourself: http://ideone.com/FbXtbm), so e.g. this glBufferData(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, /*->*/normals.size() /*<-*/ * sizeof(glm::vec3), &normals[0], GL_STATIC_DRAW); receives a zero buffer size as an argument. B) There's a ...


0

I fixed the lag spikes! (However I still don't know why they where there in the first place) Instead of using glBufferData(); every frame, I now use glBufferSubData which only updates the buffer but doesn't reallocate it. So the file now looks like this: HEADER (part) int maxSize = 20; // Initialize VBO glGenBuffers(1, &Text2DVertexBufferID); ...


2

There are a few issues with your code that might be affecting the performance. 1) Using std::vector inside a function that is called in a tight loop: std::vector<glm::vec2> vertices; std::vector<glm::vec2> UVs; std::vector is a growable array, but growing it usually has an elevated cost (a new memory allocation and a copy, more than likely). ...


3

A few things are worth noting here: You can use the same principle with GLSL3.30. The varying keyword to communicate between vertex and fragment shader has been replaced by the more general in/out concpet, with which you can pass values to the next shader stage (in your program). GLSL1.00 does not really exist. The first real version is 1.10. If you ...


2

Inverting a texture coordinate seems to be a shot in the dark. You just need to scale it down: float endX = (startX + tileWidth) / imgWidth; float endY = (startY + tileHeight) / imgHeight; startX = startX / imgWidth; startY = startY / imgHeight;


1

Not sure at all if this would be more efficient, but I believe you could do the and of two bvec3 values by converting them to another vector type like uvec3 or vec3, use the more extensive operations on those types (like bitwise and, multiplication), and then convert back. With your bvec3 values one and two, these are a few options: bvec3(uvec3(one) & ...


2

If you do not have an active shader program, you're using what is called the "fixed pipeline". The fixed pipeline performs rendering based on numerous attributes you set with OpenGL API calls. For example, you specify what transformations you want to apply. You specify material and light attributes that control the lighting of your geometry. Applying these ...


0

Already solved This is the correct light per vertex shader: vec4 ambient() { vec4 ambient = vec4 (0.0); ambient = gl_FrontMaterial.ambient * gl_LightSource[0].ambient; ambient += (gl_LightModel.ambient * gl_FrontMaterial.ambient); return ambient; } vec4 diffuse(vec3 normal) { vec4 diffuse=(0,0); vec3 lightDir = ...


3

Did You mean shader as a program used to compute shading? On wiki talk I found: (...)Shader models 1.x and 2.0 are indeed not Turing complete, because they lack a generalised iteration capability (they do have some limited looping constructs, but this is effectively unrolled at compile time, so the number of iterations must be constant). ...


0

You have various ways to overcome your problem. Palettes: Use a vertex attribute (just a ubyte) to select for each tile a value from an array of 256 uniforms the color (color is 3/4 ubytes so you just saved 2/3 ubytes). Of course I assume you have no more than 256 different colors (you could probably use a short and up to 65536 colors if 256 is not enough) ...


1

Based on the new information: add this: var material = new THREE.ShaderMaterial({ attributes:{ aGain:{ type:"f", value:null } }, fragmentShader: fs_source.... I can't explain why, but it should work. :) Without it i couldnt get the aGain to show up at all (they were all 0s as far as the gpu was ...


5

Your check for glGetAttribLocation() failing to find the attribute is incorrect: GLuint vertexUVID = glGetAttribLocation(shaderProgram, "color"); if(!vertexUVID) cout << "vertexUVID not found ..." << endl; glGetAttribLocation() returns a GLint (not GLuint), and the result is -1 if an attribute with the given name is not found in the ...


2

The GL ES 2.0 reference card defines: Variable mediump vec4 gl_FragColor; Description fragment color Units or coordinate system RGBA color It further states: Vector Components In addition to array numeric subscript syntax, names of vector components are denoted by a single letter. Components can be swizzled and replicated, e.g.: ...


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The third option, ie layout(location=0) in vec4 position; in the shader code, is now available in OpenGL ES 3.0/GLSL 300 es. Only for vertex shader input variables though.


0

Another (apparently undocumented) case where glDrawArrays and glDrawElements fail with GL_INVALID_OPERATION: GL_INVALID_OPERATION is generated if a sampler uniform is set to an invalid texture unit identifier. (I had mistakenly performed glUniform1i(location, GL_TEXTURE0); when I meant glUniform1i(location, 0);.)


1

Shader limitations and specification, are vendor-specific, and are changing along with the GPU architecture versions. Simply put, there's no unified way to "rule them all". Certain GPUs handle branching differently, some better, some worse. Some GPUs allow negative values in math functions, some don't. It quite depends on the architecture that's been used, ...


0

These are the tutorials for webgl globe. http://www.html5rocks.com/en/tutorials/webgl/globe/ http://versae.blogs.cultureplex.ca/2011/11/07/creating-a-globe-of-data/


0

I think gl_FrontColor = gl_Color*(ambient+difuse)+specular; should be gl_FrontColor = gl_Color*(ambient+diffuse)+specular; To let the driver display these errors so that you don't have to find them yourself, do this (it's in C, I'm not sure what host language you are using) // Checks if compilation of a shader was successful. // On success, returns ...


0

A missing version number, mismatched dimensions and a typo. (I keep comments about coding style to myself.) #version 140 // ? I dislike guessing vec4 ambient() { vec4 ambient = vec4 (0.0); ambient = gl_FrontMaterial.ambient * gl_LightSource[0].ambient; ambient += (gl_LightModel.ambient * gl_FrontMaterial.ambient); return ambient; } vec4 ...


1

Visual Studio has virtual folders called "Filters". These can map to real folders in the file system or you can just use them to define logical/conceptual groups of items inside your projects. To create a filter under a project in Visual Studio, just right-click with the mouse on your project in the Solution Explorer, expand "Add" and click "New Filter". A ...


0

Try doing something like this for starters: void main(){ float uvD = length(vUv); vec3 gradient = mix(color1, color2, uvD); gl_FragColor = vec4(gradient,1.); }


0

One additional trick could be to do something like fract(uv) and get the fractional portion. (it would always be within 0-1)


0

I think you are doing this the wrong way again :) Try having this as your fragment shader void main(){ gl_FragColor = vec4(1.); } and to simulate clipping try something along this lines of this in your vertex shader: if (aGain < uGainMin || aGain > uGainMax) { gl_Position = vec4(vec3(2.),1.0);//this might work, move it out of NDC and clip ...


0

The legacy DirectX SDK sample projects need modification to build with VS 2012/Windows 8.0 SDK or VS 2013/Windows 8.1 SDK. See MSDN for the details. Rather than using the legacy DirectX SDK at all, you could just use the Direct3D tutorial for Win32 desktop on MSDN Code Gallery which builds with just VS 2013/Windows 8.1 SDK.


0

I dont't know monogame, but if you want to do ambient occlusion, normally it works as a post effect. this way every pixel is garanteed to be rendered. because for each pixel, you need to look up in its vicinity, in multiple places in a circle around it (radius depends on depth). the rendering must have multiple buffers, not only color but also depth and ...


0

There are techniques like marching cubes to create a mesh out of a cloud of points. but this would never run on a smart phone in real time. unless you simulate a super tiny blob of liquid. You could raytrace the rendering using grid marching and particules in vicinity could have a distance threshold that would get the pixel to exit the marching loop and ...


1

The answer is it depends, the graphic card wiring tries to reduce the number of times a vertex is shaded to the minimum depending on buffering and batching. this is all explained here: http://fgiesen.wordpress.com/2011/07/09/a-trip-through-the-graphics-pipeline-2011-index/ There are multiple cache lines of vertex buffer tags (hear index that are pulled from ...


1

The problem here is, that you never set the Shader back to the default Shader, so your Spritebatch always uses the "solid white" Shader. As the javadock of the setShader(ShaderProgram shader)sais you can reset the Shader by calling setShader(null). Another possibility would be to use another Texture for the solid white and the simply say: Texture t = ...


1

So. After a small research and work. I have considered THREE.ShaderMaterial is the best option to complete this little task. Thanks to /extras/renderers/plugins/SpritePlugin, I realized how to make and position sprites using vertex shaders. There're still some question, but one good solution I have right now. To make this sprite, I create a simple plane ...


1

Not an answer attempt, I just need more formatting than available for comments. I cannot tell which data was actually exported from Fasceshift and how that was put into the custom ADTs of the app; my crystal ball is currently busy with predicting the FIFA Wold Cup results. But generally, a linear morph is a very simple thing: There is one vector "I" of ...


4

Presumably prm.LoadShader returns a std::string by value. Calling c_str gives you the internal character storage of a std::string, which only lives as long as the std::string does. By the end of each of the LoadShader lines, the std::string that was returned is destroyed because it was a temporary object, and the pointers you've stored are no longer pointing ...


2

You aren't actually loading the contents of the shaders. Instead, you're passing vs and fs, which are the names of the shader files, to AddShader. This tries to compile the names as though they were shader programs. You need to load the contents of the shader files first and then pass that to AddShader (or do the loading inside AddShader, but then ...


2

You use D3DReflect() to get reflection interface (ID3D11ShaderReflection) for given shader byte code. Check ID3D11ShaderReflection::GetResourceBindingDescByName() for querying specific uniform binding point.


1

The divergence of the position vector is the the divergence of the identity vector field F: ℝ³ -> ℝ³ F(r_) = r_ and div of that is both const and known: div(r_) = 3.


1

Basically, non-tilable textures and textures with some outstanding elements are different problems. Non-tilable textures There are 2 ways of solving it: Fixing the texture itself; Mirrored repeat can be used in some cases (see GL_MIRRORED_REPEAT) Textures with some outstanding elements This can be solved in the following ways (or conjunction of them): ...


0

Actually my matrix multiplication order in shader was wrong, the correct order is: gl_Position = u_pMatrix * u_mMatrix * u_vMatrix * a_Position; so the correct shader source is: private final String vertexShader = "uniform mat4 u_mMatrix; \n" // Матрица модели + "uniform mat4 u_vMatrix; \n" // Матрица ...


1

You are looking at this problem the wrong way. All games face this issue. They hide it simply by a) varying textures a lot instead of texturing large areas with the same texture and b) through level design. Imagine this plane filled with barns, gras, trees, fences and what not - suddenly the mono-textured surface blends in with its surroundings. Also camera ...


1

You appear to have a problem with coordinate systems. In many window/UI systems, including Android, the coordinates you receive as part of events are relative to the top/left corner of the window. On the other hand, the window coordinate system used by OpenGL for specifying the pixel rectangle for glReadPixels() has its origin in the bottom/left corner. You ...


1

It's quite simple - it's not at the line 394 you point to at http://pastebin.com/Z6VA9Vv7 //Go to line 394 for the motion blur and error but at line 422 color += texture2D(gcolor, coord); (as one could figure out by using e.g. the OpenGL / OpenGL ES Reference Compiler): ERROR: 0:422: 'assign' : cannot convert from '4-component vector of ...


1

It's not the real answer, why your problem is occuring, but it seems like your X coordinate is inverted. I mean, the horizontal 0 is swapped with screenWidth. Just to confirm it you can try something like gl.glReadPixels(screenWidth - touchXint, touchYint, 1, 1, GLES20.GL_RGBA, GLES20.GL_UNSIGNED_BYTE, ss); If it works, then you should search the problem ...



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