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0

SOLVED! problem was that this shader requires a GPU and the laptop i used doesn't have.


0

Yes, you should be able to run shaders for a lower version. Just make sure to identify the glsl version the code is written against in the very first line of every shader source, e.g. #version 120 The OpenGL context should also use the compatibility profile, the core profile does not contain deprecated functionality.


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I've found the solution, just simply re-bind brush texture (texture for drawing free style) after drawing image. Drawing image will bind another texture to buffer and then continue drawing free style cause openGLES still uses the previous binding texture, in this case is the image.


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point.fsh fragment shader uses a texture, but your "Drawing free style" GL code doesn't have glBindTexture. So it will use the last glBindTexture-ed texture. Also, "Drawing free style" enables one vertex attribute array. glEnableVertexAttribArray(ATTRIB_VERTEX) However "Drawing image" enables two attribute arrays. ...


0

You are probably using the wrong function call for "uniform variable". Try glGetUniformLocation() as follow: int aUseTexture = GLES20.glGetUniformLocation(program, "uUseTexture"); Also, the floating point testing (uUseTexture != 1.0) may not be always reliable all the time. You may want to use an integer type.


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You have two different blending cases in void MyApp::draw() additive - (src + dst) Order independent alpha - (src * src.a + (dst * (1.0 - src.a)) Order depdendent The first blending function would not cause the issues you are discussing, so I am assuming that mRoom.isPowerOn() == false and that we are dealing with alpha blending. To solve order ...


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I think you're essentially correct; there's both an Nvidia extension and some ARB history involved here. In the earliest version of ARB_texture_rectangle, the specification referred to samplerRect and samplerRectShadow. You can see that this was changed in early 2005. I see references to samplerRect working on Nvidia cards circa 2005, and it's noteworthy ...


1

glDrawArraysInstanced draws several instances of the data specified. In your case, it draws two times the vertices 0 to 4, which gives you two quads lying on the same position. I would suggest you simply use glDrawArrays(GL_PATCHES, 0, 8) instead, but you could also keep your draw call and translate in the vertex shader according to the gl_InstanceID.


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A comment I made earlier pointed out the problem: I suspect you have an error while compiling or linking the shaders. You can call glGetShaderiv() to assist you on that.


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You need to create an OpenGL context in compatibility mode, which probably is the default.


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which way is left/right on a line? from last edit is this not your case why not use dot protuct ? so if the line goes in -x direction the result is negative if in the +x direction then the result is positive if the result is zero that means the line goes up or down only or it is juts a point if you need specific direction instead of left/right then use ...


3

I'm trying to give a general answer to that somewhat vague question. You will of course have to normalize any vector which you need to have unit length for further calculation. In the context of classical phong-based lighting calculations, these includes all direction vectors, since what really is to be calculated are the cosines of the angles between the ...


0

gman's answer above is great, I'm just adding the following in case it is useful to others. I also went ahead and replaced the large small constants with precomputed values where possible, for both the rayleigh coefficient and the mie coefficient: #!/usr/bin/python import math # Poor man's vector lib def dot( a, b ): return a[0] * b[0] + a[1] * b[1] + ...


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I'm only guessing this is a bug in ANGLE. I tried displaying results at various places in the fragment shader. After a few bisects I found that this line produced different results on Windows vs OSX vec3 betaR = totalRayleigh(lambda) * reileighCoefficient; totalRayleigh looks like this vec3 totalRayleigh(vec3 lambda) { return (8.0 * pow(pi, 3.0) * ...


0

vertex shader /* shader to update a particle system based on a simple kinematics function */ #version 410 core layout (location = 0) in vec3 v_i; // initial velocity layout (location = 1) in float start_time; uniform mat4 V, P; uniform vec3 emitter_pos_wor; // emitter position in world coordinates uniform float elapsed_system_time; // system time in ...


0

My conclusion is that this is most likely impossible, because a great part of the OpenGL porting involved separate shaders programming for each proprietary device. For example, in the /shaders/ folder there are separate files for terrain shadow rendering for each major manufacturer which provided a graphics card for machines which ran OS X (ATI and ...


1

This can't be right: float elements[] = { 0,1,2, 2,3,0 }; You can't use floats for vertex indices. Based on the type you pass to glDrawElements(), this should be: GLuint elements[] = { 0,1,2, 2,3,0 }; As for the state tracked in a VAO: No, it does not hold on to all that state. It only tracks the vertex attribute setup state. From your ...


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Option A) you can add a color to the current diffuse color/texture and apply that fragment shader only to the selected one: color = ... gl_FragColor= mix(color, selectioncolor, 0.5); Option B) you render to a framebuffer, and postproccess the object to add the color The options depends on your capability to change the shader and ...


1

To answer your second question, yes you need to be able to access Camera's view matrix for every shader you use. You probably need to make it accessible to whatever object does the rendering. Each Model can have its own shader, but since shader changes are among the most costly state-switching operations, many engines batch rendering by shader. So ...


2

Modern OpenGL requires you to write vert/frag shaders in order to render anything, so it would be a safe bet to have the Material stored with the Model object. You could perhaps have a Default Material if none was linked with a model object - kind of like missing textures or models. Rendering engine architecture is a big concept in general and I don't fully ...


1

Chances are it is switching shaders and something else is wrong. Having a blank screen could mean one (or more) of like 10 different things. Such as: Your object is off screen. Most common for me is the z axis being wrong. You are not passing attributes or uniforms correctly. The texture didn't get loaded correctly. There is a bug in your shader code that ...


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Possible yes, but the most elegant method depends on the OpenGL version profile available. The most elegant solution would be vertex transform feedback https://www.opengl.org/wiki/Transform_Feedback If you don't have VTF you'll have to write the information into the framebuffer (in a fragment buffer object) for readback (this will of course prevent you from ...


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In render() call rayHandler.updateAndRender(); before drawing tmx. (If i understood, you dont want to have any shadows or lights on the squares and this will fix it). Sorry for my English.


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Your red and blue channels are swapped in the image file. To correct this, use a different pixel transfer format (BGR): GLint pixel_mode = GL_BGR; // Image File GLint internal_mode = GL_RGB; // OpenGL glTexParameteri(GL_TEXTURE_2D, GL_TEXTURE_MAG_FILTER, GL_LINEAR); glTexParameteri(GL_TEXTURE_2D, ...


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I have no idea why..But changing this line.. finalColor.a= 1-(_botmcut + sqrt((xpos*xpos)-(r*r)))/_constant; to this.. finalColor.a= 1-(_botmcut + sqrt((r*r)-(xpos*xpos)))/_constant; Worked. It doesnt make sense!


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And the answer is....... It's # not @ when declaring version in the shader code...


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A few things that I normally do when tracking down shader issues. Option 1 Try using PIX or some other standard program to debug the shader. You just need to capture the frame and right click on the pixel and hit debug. I'd pay close attention to what each value is, make sure none are set to 0 that shouldn't be. Also verify in this tool the right ...


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Predefined variables like gl_ProjectionMatrix are only available in the compatibility profile. Since you specify the core profile for your shader, you will not be able to use them: #version 150 core If you were using the compatibility profile (and I'm in no way suggesting that it would be a good idea), you could use them. You would then set the value of ...


0

Ok, I used reflection to check the accuracy of the size of the buffer, the problem turned out to be the following line: VS_CBUFFER_DATA* cbData = (VS_CBUFFER_DATA*)&mappedSubResource.pData; I omitted it and just used memcpy and the size of the buffer that was returned from the reflection query. Thanks for the assistance though guys.


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Your problem is in the memcpy. This line here: memcpy(cbData, &m_CBufferData, sizeof(cbData)); is copying a number of bytes equal to the size of a VS_CBUFFER_DATA pointer, which on 32 bit systems is 4 bytes (8 bytes on x64). The code should read: memcpy(cbData, &m_CBufferData, sizeof(VS_CBUFFER_DATA)); which will copy 48 bytes of data as ...


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You need to use something like Adobe Pixel Bender to compile your text file into a binary pbj.


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I figured it out. The entry point was not right in the shader. The fxc command compiled my shader with no errors or warnings, but my shader didn't have the entry point properly defined. Weird. That's why the byte code was only about 200 bytes. That said, my shader was very simple, a pass-through, I could have believed it was 200 bytes. It's more like ...


1

I think you are confusing sampler bindings with fragment data output locations. While the two things can both be assigned using a layout (...) qualifier, they are very different. layout (location = X) out vec3 color assigns the output color to GL_COLOR_ATTACHMENT0 + X layout (binding = Y) sampler2D texHDR tells GLSL to use texture image unit GL_TEXTURE0 + ...


2

I believe there is a problem with how you combine the rotation around the axis with your global rotation contained in u_Matrix: vec2 point = rotate(u_Center.xz, a_Position.xz, radians(u_RotationAngle)); gl_Position = a_Position; gl_Position *= u_Matrix; gl_Position.x = point.x; gl_Position.z = point.y; Since point only contains the rotation around the ...


0

Perhaps simply not including the environment in the rendering : ModelBatch batch = new ModelBatch(); ... public void render() { batch.begin(camera); batch.render(instance); batch.render(otherInstance, environment); batch.end(); }


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This might be a problem with your OpenGL implementation. I could not find anything in the 3.2 spec saying that vertex attributes are required. To the contrary, the first sentence of section "2.11.3 Vertex Attributes" clearly suggests that having vertex attributes is optional: Vertex shaders can define named attribute variables, which are bound to the ...


1

Are you implying that stages in your pipeline have uniforms with the same name? For example, the program associated with the vertex stage has a uniform float time and the program associated with the fragment stage has a uniform float time? Considering the whole point of separable shaders is not linking stages together, there is no notion of shared ...


-2

You could turn on antialiasing by passing setting antialias = true: var renderer = new THREE.WebGLRenderer( {antialias:true} );


0

Updates code of shader after 'Gnietschow' remarks: struct VSInputTxVc { float4 Position : POSITION; float2 TexCoord : TEXCOORD0; float4 Color : COLOR; }; struct VS_OUTPUT { float4 Position : POSITION; float2 Tex: TEXCOORD0; }; //Vertex Shader VS_OUTPUT RenderSceneVS(VSInputTxVc VertexIn) { VS_OUTPUT VertexOut; ...


0

I think the problem is because you only assign values to the resolution uniform in the function onWindowResize: uniforms.resolution.value.x = window.innerWidth; uniforms.resolution.value.y = window.innerHeight; And since when you initialise the uniform (function createContent()), you just assign to resolution a new vector (new THREE.Vector2()), it's ...


0

Thanks to the info from @Gnietschow I was able to get this working. The following optimized version will use less than 512 instruction slots. float2 texture_size; float4x4 matrixTransform; const static float coef = 2.0; const static float3 yuv_weighted = float3(14.352, 28.176, 5.472); sampler decal : register(s0); float4 df(float4 A, float4 B) { ...


1

You're setting the color of the vertices of the quad. All information outputted by the vertexshader is automatically interpolated between the three vertices of a triangle by the rasterizer to generate the fragments. These are passed to the pixelshader, which simply returns the given color leading to the gradient. To circumvent this behaviour, you have 2 ...


1

According to the documentation Attribute bindings do not go into effect until glLinkProgram is called You seem to link only once and that appears to be before you call genAttribList which is the function that calls glBindAttribLocation. So, use glLinkProgram again at the end of genAttribList would be my suggestion.


2

One immediately apparent problem is that you're missing glClear() calls for all but the first render target. You call it once after binding fbo 0: glBindFramebuffer(GL_FRAMEBUFFER,postfboId[0]); ... glClear(GL_COLOR_BUFFER_BIT | GL_DEPTH_BUFFER_BIT); But you'll also need to clear after binding fbo 1: glBindFramebuffer(GL_FRAMEBUFFER,postfboId[1]); ...


2

The default shader for SpriteBatches in libgdx requires textures to work. When looking at the shader code, one will see, that the final result is a composition of the vertex color and the texture color: gl_FragColor = v_color * texture2D(u_texture, v_texCoords); When not supplying a texture, the vertex color will be multiplied by [0,0,0,0], which results ...


2

Disabling vertex attributes would not really disable your textures, it would just give you undefined texture coordinates. That might produce an affect similar to disabling a certain texture, but to do this properly you should use a uniform or possibly subroutines (if you have dozens of variations of the same shader). As far as time taken to disable a vertex ...


0

glGetUniformLocation (...) operates on linked GLSL programs, not shaders. You might think that since uniforms appear in individual shaders they are specific to a particular shader object, but that's not the case at all. In fact, GLSL uniforms are not even assigned locations until all stages of a GLSL program (vertex, fragment, geometry, etc.) are linked ...


1

You are using the C syntax incorrectly: char buffer[1024]; ... glShaderSource(..., (const char **)&buffer, ...); This is not a pointer to a pointer to the real string data. By definition, &buffer is the same as buffer here - a pointer to the first char in buffer, of type char *. Casting that to something else only conceals the error here. This ...


0

I've tryed to symplify this example: [http://threejs.org/examples/#webgl_postprocessing_dof2][1] here is what I got: <!DOCTYPE html> <html lang="en"> <head> <title>TEST</title> <meta charset="utf-8"> <meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, user-scalable=no, ...


1

Jessy's answer is correct that most fragment shaders set a default precision at the top of the fragment shader code. However you are using Three.js's RawShaderMaterial which does not prepend any of the built-in uniforms, attributes, and precision declarations. So you have to define it yourself. On the other hand the tutorial you linked to is using ...



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