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Generally, you have three ways to load a shader library in Metal: Use runtime shader compilation from shader source code via the MTLDevice newLibraryWithSource:options:error: or newLibraryWithSource:options:completionHandler: methods. Although purists may shy away from runtime compilation, this option has minimal practical overhead, and so is completely ...


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I finally found the error, the order of parameters for the call glAttachShader(shader, program); were mixed up. You first have to pass the program and then the shader id like so: glAttachShader(program, shader);. Thank you for your answers though!


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+1 for using discrete Normal, Point, and Vector classes. In your shade() method, it doesn't look to me like you're accounting for the distance of the light source to the intersection point. Basically, you want intersection points that are further away from a given light to receive less light than points that are closer to the light. You can fudge this for ...


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You must re-link your program after binding attribute locations. This is outlined in the documentation for glBindAttribLocation (...) as follows: Name glBindAttribLocation — Associates a generic vertex attribute index with a named attribute variable C Specification void glBindAttribLocation( GLuint program, ...


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gl_FragColor = texture2D(u_texture, v_texCoords); gl_FragColor.rgb = mix(gl_FragColor.rgb, vec3(1.0), v_color.a); This is the solution, thanks to @Tenfour04


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Nvidia actually has a really legit tutorial on how to program GPU fluid dynamics!!! Go and check it out! http://http.developer.nvidia.com/GPUGems/gpugems_ch38.html Warning: Math!


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Finally I was able to pass a custom attribute to vertex shader! Thanks a lot to @Xoppa for pointing me in the right direction. This is the working solution I've got so far (I'm open for any further advices on how to implement it in a more elegant way): First of all, as Xoppa stated in the comment it's required to create a model providing custom vertex ...


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Three stores the key value store you're looking for in material.__webglShader.uniforms Also look in THREE.UniformsLib and also THREE.ShaderLib - e.g. THREE.ShaderLib.phong these contain the templates for built-in uniforms and also the shaders, like MeshPhongMaterial, which use them.


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The problem is here: glEnableVertexAttribArray(0); glVertexAttribPointer(glGetAttribLocation(shader.GetProgramID(), "vertex_position"), 3, GL_FLOAT, GL_FALSE, 0, NULL); Both of these calls take the attribute location as the first argument. While the location for the position may happen to be 0, this is not guaranteed, and you should ...


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vertex_color doesn't match the variable in your vertex shader.


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The texture function call is not correct, secondly the texture function returns float values which needs to handled in shader by dividing the RGBA components by 255.0 (as you use GL_R8UI) and return and fragment color output. uniform usampler2D tex; out uvec3 OutColor; void main(void){ uvec3 vec_tex; vec_tex = texture(tex, TexCoordOut) OutColor ...


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@Andon M. Coleman solved it for me! use glVertexAttribIPointer (...) instead of glVertexAttribPointer (...).


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The Graphics.SetRenderTarget overload that takes an array of RenderBuffers can be used to specify multiple render buffers. The shader can output multiple color values that will be written to those render buffers. You can also query the maximum number of simultaneous supported render targets using SystemInfo.supportedRenderTargetCount in order to support ...


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Good job, that is only one way to pass color variables through two shaders. However, a little more simply, you can do it without passing them through two shaders. vec2 uv = gl_FragCoord.xy / resolution.xy; gl_FragColor = vec4(uv,0.0,1.0); You still need to pass one uniform2f, resolution directly going to the fragment shader or you can define it as a ...


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Could solve this by making use of glMultiDrawArrays()..Found the solution by correctly specifying the index positions.The code looks like below after fixes. //globals size_t pt_count = 0; GLint *startIndices; GLint *endIndices; GLint nLineCount; //create the VBO for(int i=0;i< vLines.size();i++) pt_count += vLines[i].vPointList.size(); ...


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I figured out a way to do it: I changed my shaders like this: // Vertex Shader attribute vec4 inColor; varying vec4 vColor; attribute vec4 vPosition; void main() { gl_Position = vPosition; vColor = inColor; } // Fragment Shader varying vec4 vColor; void main() { gl_FragColor = vColor; } Then i draw the rectangle like that: public static void ...


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I had forgotten to assign gl_Position in the vertex shader.


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If you don't want to deal with sorting issues, I think you could do this with a shader. But every object will have to be either affected by shadow or not. So tall trees could be marked as not shadow receiving, while the ground, grass, and characters would be shadow receiving. First make a frame buffer with clear color white. Draw all your shadows on it as ...


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Draw your shadows to fbo with disabled blending. Draw background e.g. grass Draw shadows texture from fbo Draw all other sprites


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Try disabling wrapping on your inputImageTexture2 texture, perhaps? i.e. call these functions when the inputImageTexture2 texture is bound. glTexParameteri(GL_TEXTURE_2D, GL_TEXTURE_WRAP_S, GL_CLAMP_TO_EDGE); glTexParameteri(GL_TEXTURE_2D, GL_TEXTURE_WRAP_T, GL_CLAMP_TO_EDGE);


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What you seem to want is inefficient, but one way to accomplish it would be to make sure that all three faceVertexUV values for each triangle face are the same: that is for a triangle ABC the UV coordinates are all, say (.4,.6),(.4,.6),(.4,.6) This means that all pixels of the rendered triangle will have that one uniform UV and you'll always get the same ...


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As @Columbo mentioned, it was NaN exception (throwed cause of division by zero), which lead to weird shader behaviour. I modified the code slightly: float F_Schlick (in float f0, in float f90, in float u) { return f0 + ( f90 - f0 ) * pow(clamp(1.0 - u, 0.0, 1.0), 5.0); //line 34 } Dot product should be greater than zero: float dotNV = abs(dot(N, V)); ...


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glBufferData copies the content of initPos into the SSBO. The shader then operates on the buffer, not on the cpu memory array. Unless you read the buffer back from GPU to CPU memory somewhere, initPos will never change.


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glBufferData For glBufferData, the total size of the data in bytes is required. In addition a consecutive memory segment is required, which a vector<vector<T>> does not provide. Technically, each inner vector has it's own memory segment where the data is stored, which makes it impossible to upload the data at once. The only way that comes to my ...


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I managed to solve it myself. The line "glClear(GL_COLOR_BUFFER_BIT || GL_DEPTH_BUFFER_BIT);" was wrong and should be "glClear(GL_COLOR_BUFFER_BIT | GL_DEPTH_BUFFER_BIT);".


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After updating to newer version of Unity problem resolved itself.


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Doesn't updating materials happen automatically? or do you maybe mean "update preview"? I know that when you do a loop for all your materials, you can via code update the loop and all of its functions by deciding when to trigger the function. You can acces those materials + all of its functions with something like: (libile can be external file of internal ...


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It’s very doable — you just have to think about the ranges you’re sampling in. In your Shadertoy example, you have the following: float r = length(uv); float t = atan(uv.y, uv.x); fragColor = vec4(texture2D(iChannel0, vec2(r, 0.1))); So r is going to vary roughly from 0…1 (extending past 1 in the corners), and t—the angle of the uv vector—is going to ...


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Too lazy to fully analyze the code without the propper context of what you are sending to the shaders ... but your subquestions are easy enough: What do this lines mean? vec4 fvObjectPosition = gl_ModelViewMatrix * gl_Vertex; this converts gl_Vertex (polygon edge points) from object/model coordinate system to camera coordinate system in other words it ...


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What you're looking for is the Metal equivalent of D3D's "AppendStructuredBuffer". You want a type that can have structures added to it atomically. I'm not familiar with Metal, but it does support Atomic operations such as 'Add' which is all you really need to roll your own Append Buffer. Initialise the counter to 0 and have each thread add '1' to the ...


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Since I needed more input on this matter, I linked this page to reddit and someone was able to help me with one response! Anyways the reddit link is here: https://www.reddit.com/r/opengl/comments/3gyvlt/opengl_passing_all_scene_data_into_shader_each/ The issue of seeing two individual textures/quads after passing all vertices as one data structure over to ...


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The compiler evaluates both branches, which makes conditions quite expensive. If you use both sin and cos in your shader, you can calculate only sin(a) and cos(a) = 1.0 - sin(a) since sin(x) + cos(x) is always 1.0


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I got tired of my conditionals being ignored so I just made a another kernel and did an override in c execution. If you need it to be accurate all the time I suggest this fix.


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Since your using a texture as a height map, you should make sure that: heightText.magFilter = THREE.LinearFilter; // This is the default value. so that the values you receive are smoothed texel to texel.


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as I wrote before your log is not GLSL compilation/link log you have messed it up somewhere. When I put your shaders into mine engine here is the log for nVidia Environment: [Vertex] OK [Fragment] OK 0(9) : warning C7533: global variable gl_FragColor is deprecated after version 120 [Program] Linker error Fragment info ------------- 0(9) : warning C7533: ...


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You have just single sampler2D which means you have just single texture at your disposal regardless on how many of them you bind. If you really need to pass the data as single block then you should add sampler per each texture you got not sure how many objects/textures you have but you are limited by gfx hw limit on texture units with this way of data ...


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If I'm understanding your question correctly, you cannot access the variables in a shader directly, you have to use the methods on the material object. Try the following code to get your renderer component and set the value of (for instance) a float in its shader: Renderer rend = GetComponent<Renderer>(); rend.material.SetFloat("_fooVal", 2.0f /* Your ...


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How is this correctly linked with the cosinus and sinus variables? You can send data to a shader uniform variable via glUniform function. For example: in your vertex shader, you have 2 float values, so you will call glUniform1f twice each time with different location and different value. Or you can stick the float variables to one vec2 variable like so: ...


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I don't get good results with this code. I guess it has something to do with the mvMatrix applied in the vertex shader and then using it again in right and up vectors. I come up with a new code that works relatively well: Vertex shader: #version 150 core attribute vec4 vertex; varying vec3 vert; uniform mat4 projMatrix; uniform mat4 mvMatrix; uniform ...


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The critical value here, lightPos, was being set as a function of vertexPos, which you have expressed in screen space (this happened because its original world space form was multiplied by modelView). Screen space stays with the camera, not anything in the 3D world. So to have a non-moving light source with respect to some absolute point in world space ...


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The projection matrix should not be applied to the vertex shader, I would do this all in view-space and then transform the final result into clip-space in the geometry shader. This avoids having to divide everything by W in the geometry shader. You want to screen-align each of your triangles, which is very easy to do in a geometry shader (this is ...


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Since Android 4.0 (actually 3.0 but Google/Android never released the code as distinct product) OpenGL ES 2.0 has always been part of the spec required to get Android Market/Google Play. See: Android 4.0 Compatibility Definition Document and Android Compatibility Definition Document Archive for the other versions. Since OpenGL ES 2.0 uses shaders written in ...


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Transformations look good imho. Maybe it's due to the fact that 'XMMatrixTranslationFromVector' takes only 3d-vector as the documentation (msdn) says. Also make sure that RotateAround function and camera view/proj matrices give correct results. Best regards.


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OK, the solution was of course a very small detail: the division of simd::float3 behaves absolutely nuts. In fact, if I do the perspective divide in the fragment shader like this: float4 targetIntensity = intensityRight.sample(s, inFrag.warp.xy * (1.0 / inFrag.warp.z)); it works! Which lead me to find out that multiplying by the pre-divided float is ...


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I can't debug your code now,but based on what I see here you forgot to enable second attribute array.See this example for reference. But even if I am wrong,I would like to point you to some bad practices you have in your code.You are using GL 3.3 which is good.This is modern OpenGL baseline.But you are still mixing old API (pre 3.3) with the new one.From the ...


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normal/bump maps provide fine details without increasing complexity of geometry that means more details at very low performance cost normal/bump maps are optional of coarse normal shading (fragment shader) normal is vector perpendicular to fragment/face/primitive there are 2 use for it: dull surface illumination lets have: color - per ...


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position , y lol. You have a comma instead of a period. it should be position**.**y.


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From what I see You are binding all textures as separate texture unit that is wrong what if you have 100 objects and each has 4 textures ... I strongly doubt that you have 400 texture units at your disposal Texture ID (name) is not Texture unit ... I render space bodies like this: First pass renders the astro body geometry I have specific texture ...


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Short answer On Windows, it will work. On OS X and Linux/Mesa it will not work. Long answer If you are using the compatibility profile, yes, it will work. If you are using the core profile, then GLSL versions before 1.40 will not be supported. OpenGL implementations on Windows tend to have strong support for legacy applications, including the ...


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OpenGL and GLSL versions Every OpenGL version since 2.0 has been released with a corresponding GLSL version. However, the GLSL version numbers were not always in sync with the GL version. Here is a table: > OpenGL Version GLSL Version > 2.0 1.10 > 2.1 1.20 > 3.0 1.30 > 3.1 1.40 > ...



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