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9

Consider using Rtree to help identify which grid cells that a polygon may intersect. This way, you can remove the for loop used with the array of lat/lons, which is probably the slow part. Structure your code something like this: from shapely.ops import cascaded_union from rtree import index idx = index.Index() # Populate R-tree index with bounds of grid ...


8

On Ubuntu, to install GEOS, this worked for me: $ sudo apt-get install libgeos-dev


8

Installed shapely using pip, and had the same problem. So I went ahead and installed it like so: sudo apt-get install libgeos-dev And it worked. I'm running Ubuntu, so if you're on Fedora, you should probably run: sudo yum install libgeos-dev


7

I found a solution that works for the specific case given: >>> pp2 = pp.buffer(0) >>> pp2.is_valid True >>> pp2.exterior.coords[:] [(0.0, 0.0), (0.0, 3.0), (3.0, 3.0), (3.0, 0.0), (2.0, 0.0), (0.0, 0.0)] >>> pp2.interiors[0].coords[:] [(2.0, 1.0), (2.0, 2.0), (1.0, 2.0), (1.0, 1.0), (2.0, 1.0)] ...


7

Remember: the world isn't flat! If Google Maps' projection is the answer you want, you need to project the geographic coordinates onto spherical Mercator to get a different set of X and Y coordinates. Pyproj can help with this, just make sure you reverse your coordinate axes before (i.e.: X, Y or longitude, latitude). import pyproj from shapely.geometry ...


6

So, I discovered the trick is to use a combination of the Polygon class methods to achieve this. If you want geodesic coordinates, you then need to transform these back to WGS84 (via pyproj, matplotlib's basemap, or something). from shapely.geometry import Polygon #Create polygon from lists of points x = [list of x vals] y = [list of y vals] some_poly = ...


6

For questions 2-4, you have to have GEOS installed on your system. If you have homebrew you can do the following: brew install geos Install homebrew here if you don't have it: http://mxcl.github.com/homebrew/


5

Although you have already accepted an answer, but in addition to @MikeT's answer I will add this for future visitors who might want to do the same with matplotlib and basemap in mpl_toolkit : from mpl_toolkits.basemap import Basemap from matplotlib.path import Path # Mercator Projection # http://matplotlib.org/basemap/users/merc.html m = ...


4

I originally suggested using the law of cosines in vector form: if your two line segments are given by the vectors b and c, and the angle between them is θ, then b · c = |b| |c| cos θ and so θ = cos−1((b · c) / |b| |c|) But as Alex Wien points out in comments, this gives poor results when θ is close to zero: >>> theta = 1e-6 ...


4

This type of intersection is easily done by the "min of the maxes" and "max of the mins" idea. To write it out one needs a specific notion for the rectangle, and, just to make things clear I'll use a namedtuple: from collections import namedtuple Rectangle = namedtuple('Rectangle', 'xmin ymin xmax ymax') ra = Rectangle(3., 3., 5., 5.) rb = Rectangle(1., ...


4

If you're just after a collection of polygons you don't need to pre-order the point to build them. The scipy.spatial.Voronoi object has a ridge_vertices attribute containing indices of vertices forming the lines of the Voronoi ridge. If the index is -1 then the ridge goes to infinity. First start with some random points to build the Voronoi object. import ...


4

The geometry contains non-closed rings. Looking at the first and last coordinate: -93.577695846689437 40.813390731817726 -93.577695846689437 40.81339073181772 Adding 6 at the end of the last coordinate string will make the two equal, and the outer shell a closed linear ring required to make a polygon.


3

Christoph Gohlke maintains an excellent pool of Unofficial Windows Binaries for Python Shapely for 32- and 64-bit versions of Python, which includes GEOS dependencies


3

You are getting this exception because p1 is not a valid polygon. >>> p1.is_valid False >>> p2.is_valid True The documentation says that: A valid Polygon may not possess any overlapping exterior or interior rings. Keep in mind that since the first and last point of your polygons are different shapely is going to append the first ...


3

Shapely is built on top of a C wrapper around the C++ GEOS library. Somewhere deep inside this C++ library sit the Precision classes which handle roundoff errors. I think we may conclude that your version of Shapely, and the geos libraries, handle this case differently. Unfortunately the code that accesses the precision model is not available in the C api, ...


3

It doesn't make sense to add or remove points from a Polygon's exterior, because you'd want to recalculate poly.area, poly.length, etc. anyway. Instead, create a new Polygon instance from the old polygon's coordinates: coords = poly.exterior.coords[:] coords[1] = (2.0, 6.0) # coordinate to change new_poly = Polygon(coords) Note that this doesn't account ...


3

As previously pointed out, p1 is not valid. On plotting it, I noticed a little 'bowtie' at the lower right. I assume you don't need this in your polygon; if not, you can try Shapely's buffer(0) trick (documented in the Shapely Manual) to fix that: In [382]: p1.is_valid Out[382]: False In [383]: p1 = p1.buffer(0) In [384]: p1.is_valid Out[384]: True ...


3

I actually solved the problem myself. p1 = Polygon(ring.coords) p2 = Polygon(ring2.coords) to make polygons from my rings. then I create an array with those polygons. merge them with cascaded_union and create a LinearRing from the new polygon. pols = [p1, p2] new_pol = ops.cascaded_union(pols) new_ring = LinearRing(new_pol.exterior.coords)


3

According to the Shapely manual, it states that the following for the z coordinate plane for geometric objects: A third z coordinate value may be used when constructing instances, but has no effect on geometric analysis. All operations are performed in the x-y plane. If your calculations require the z coordinate plane, then Shapely might not be for ...


3

Basically, you want to take the difference of your "unioned" polygons with the large square and then polygonize the result to get individual, separate polygons. For example: #-- Get the region not covered by individual squares. uncovered_region = Polygon(bigsquare).difference(union) # In some cases, the result will be a single polygon... if not ...


3

It seems that you will have to arrange your code differently to make it work. The general layout of animation code consits of two parts: 1. Creating of the static content of the plot In this step you create the figure, add the subplots, draw all static content (for example the basemap) and usually add either the first data set or some compatible dummy ...


3

I like the question. I doubt I can give you the best answer, and definitely can't help with OGR, but FWIW I'll tell you what I'm doing right now. I use GeoPandas, a geospatial extension of pandas. I recommend it — it's high-level and does a lot, giving you everything in Shapely and fiona for free. It is in active development by twitter/@kajord and others. ...


3

I would use an R-Tree. But I'd insert all your points (and not the polygon's bounding box) into the R-Tree. use r tree index for example: http://toblerity.org/rtree/ from rtree import index from rtree.index import Rtree idx = index.Index(); // Inserting a point, i.e. where left == right && top == bottom, will essentially insert a single point ...


3

They are inverse relationships: A contains B, and B is within A. >>> A.contains(B) True >>> B.within(A) True +----------------------------------+ | | | +----------+ | | | | | | | | | | | ...


3

Use Rtree (examples) as R-tree index to: (1) index the bounds of the 36k polygons (do this just after reading jsonfile), then (2) very quickly find the intersecting bounding boxes of each polygon to your point of interest. Then, (3) for the intersecting bounding boxes from Rtree, use shapely to use, e.g. point.within(p) to do the actual point-in-polygon ...


3

There isn't any way to represent a polygon in Shapely without discretizing it. At the base level Shapely deals with points. Everything from a LineString to a Polygon is just a list of points. A good example of this is what happens when you take a Point and buffer it out: >>> import shapely >>> from shapely.geometry.point import Point ...


2

Have you tried the SDXF library ?


2

The problem seems to be that you haven't actually installed the required modules. Lines of Python code like from mpl_toolkits.basemap import Basemap Are import statements that tell your script to use modules (or other bits of Python code) that you need to have already installed. For each of the packages mentioned (NumPy, Matplotlib, Basemap) you will ...


2

Locate the line segment in the LineString where the point lies. Then split in two groups the vertices of the LineString accordingly. To locate the line segment, simply apply a point / line segment intersection test to each segment. from shapely.geometry import Point,LineString def split(line_string, point): coords = line_string.coords j = None ...


2

Interior and exterior rings are structured differently. For any polygon, there is always 1 exterior ring with zero or more interior rings. So looking at the structure of a geometry, exterior is a LinearRing object, and interiors is a list of zero or more LinearRing objects. Any LinearRing object will have coords, which you can slice to see a list of the ...



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