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5

Modifying constant objects is Undefined Behavior. Anything may happen. In your case, you might have become unlucky because GCC does not yet pool all constant variables and literals, it did not put it into a read-only section (Define more of them and it might happen), and your main() is the first and last code accessing that external constant object (though ...


3

Is this a feasible solution or is there a better solution? This is not a good solution. You are setting yourself and your users up for dependency hell. Below is an alternative that can work. It is related to the idea of plugin libraries. You can build the optional features in a shared library that exposes a C interface. Your application/library can ...


3

No. No. Yes. Basically, it's up to the compiler/toolchain/operating system to provide protection for const variables. Some combinations of those go out of their way to make sure that what's supposed to be read-only will be read-only even if it means allocating a whole page (several kB) just to store one variable. Others make different trade-offs and will ...


3

The best solution is to declare that the library's explicit specializations exist. // All in the same header file: template <typename T> F* getF() { return 0; } template <> F* getF<int>(); template <> F* getF<float>(); This satisfies the rule from Standard 14.7.3/6: If a template, a member template or a member of a class ...


3

I believe that I have come across a workable solution. It is based upon techniques for creating -nostdlib executables (such as OS kernels). However, our shared library still links the standard libraries in this case. I found this RaspberryPi forum thread especially useful. The solution is to manually execute the function pointers stored in the shared ...


2

I think the object data is safely stored on the heap, even after dlclose() (unless C++ dynamic space allocator is changed). But surely you'll have a problem calling virtual methods. The virtual table will point to a text area no longer available. And C++ does not provide means to rebind virtual methods; not that I know. If you really need to, you can: ...


2

Inline functions are not externally visible (have no linkage, IIRC), so they are not exportable from a DLL. If they are to be public, then they are fully written in the header file of your library and every user recompiles it. And as you say in the question, since the inlined code is recompiled in every module that uses the library, so for future versions ...


1

Recompile after adding the option -Wl,-M to your CXXFLAGS. Search for 'Archive member included...', The following lines will show what libraries where included in the file, and what functions requested them. An example: gcc -std=gnu99 -O0 -Wall -Wextra -Wunused -Wl,-M -c showmmap.c -o showmmap.o gcc -std=gnu99 -O0 -Wall -Wextra -Wunused -Wl,-M ...


1

If you are upgrading the package that had previously provided P-A.1.0 and the new version of the package no longer provides that version of the library and only provides the P-A.1.1 version of the library then RPM will not allow that upgrade to occur without being forced because it would break P-B.1.0. You have a number of options to handle this sort of ...


1

You can use the files, basename and replace functions to get what you need: LIBS *= -L$$PWD/MYLIBS win32 { SHARED_LIB_FILES = $$files($$PWD/MYLIBS/*.dll) for(FILE, SHARED_LIB_FILES) { BASENAME = $$basename(FILE) LIBS += -l$$replace(BASENAME,.dll,) } } unix { SHARED_LIB_FILES = $$files($$PWD/MYLIBS/*.so) for(FILE, ...


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There is no such thing as memory dynamically allocated from the dynamically loaded libaries. Memory allocated dynamically means it is allocated with a call to malloc. There's only one malloc in your program, and it is of no importance whether the call to it comes from the part of the program code which was loaded with your original executable or with a ...


1

Thanks for the answer. I managed to install OpenCV 3.0.0-dev version by removing my existing OpenCV installation. Although this was not required, I removed my previous 2.4.8 library files and managed to compile it. CCMake helped make the decision for the installation much simpler. Use that to decide which libraries you'd like to compile before running make.


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You system, through ld.so.conf, ld.so.conf.d, and the system environment, LD_LIBRARY_PATH, etc.., provides the system-wide library search paths which are supplemented by installed libraries through pkg-config information and the like when you build against standard libraries. When a library resides in a defined search path, the standard library search paths ...


1

The ld-linux.so library is the one that actually controls which library gets linked in at run time. The -L option to GCC, on the other hand, only affects the compile-time search path for libraries. The man page says: When resolving library dependencies, the dynamic linker first inspects each dependency string to see if it contains a slash (this can ...


1

I decide to add one more solution for any, who got here: personally in my case the information provided by the file and objdump wasn't enough, and the grep isn't much of a help -- I resolve my case through the readelf -a -W. Note, that this gives you pretty much info. The arch related information resides in the very beginning and the very end. Here's an ...


1

Is there anyway to check the relationships between c executable and libraries other than ldd? Any insight why the dependency (libodbc.so.1) is only showing up on linux and how to resolve? 1) If you want to know why there is a dependency, I suggest to try finding common symbols. Unfortunatelly, you must have the libodbc library installed, because ...


1

This is a linker error — ld is the linker program on Unix systems. The linker is complaining because you're using library functions (mhash_get_hash_pblock, etc.) but you didn't provide a definition for them. The preprocessor directive #include <mhash.h> declares functions (and types, etc.) from the mhash library. That's good enough to compile your ...


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big_random_block(), float_to_color (a kernel) and probably all your other duplicate definitions are coming from book.h. This header file differs from (what I consider to be common practice in) other header files in that it does not just include function prototypes, but actual function definitions. Therefore book.h can only be ...


1

I just followed this instructions and it works just fine. http://askubuntu.com/questions/369310/how-to-fix-missing-libudev-so-0-for-chrome-to-start-again sudo ln -s /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libudev.so.1.3.5 /usr/lib/libudev.so.0


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If you want to build a bundle use -bundle instead of -dynamiclib when you're making the file. The most obvious difference between bundles and dylibs is that you can link to a dylib at compile time. e.g. g++ -o testfile testcode.c -lmylib will link to libmylib.dylib, while if you attempt to link a bundle you get: ld: can't link with bundle (MH_BUNDLE) only ...


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ldd shows which shared libraries a library or executable needs. In this case none, because libddv3djava.so is statically linked. The compiler flag -fpic and linker flag -shared enables libddv3djava.so to be used as a shared object which is something else. To make libddv3djava.so depend on the shared library file libddv3d.so it must be added on to the ...


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It means that OpenCV gpu module in Debian repository was built without CUDA and it is just a stub, where each function throws exception "Not available". 400 Mb is a real size of gpu module, which was built with CUDA support.


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First of all, you don't need Binder, you can pass a file descriptor using sendmsg() and recvmsg() through a Unix local socket. For an example, see the SendFd() and ReceiveFd() functions in [1] Second ashmem regions are reference-counted, as long as one file descriptor is opened on an ashmem region, it will not disappear, even if the process that created is ...


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Try this instead jQuery(document).ready(function($){ // You can then use `$` inside this func, // it will not show errors now $('blockquote').quovolver(); }); $.noConflict(true);


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Generally speaking, you can replace a shared library with an other version of the shared library in distribution (without recompilation of the executable, etc.) in case the original library and the replaced library do have same ABI


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The other answers are absolutely correct about this being Undefined Behavior and thus something you should not do. The reason your broken code is "working" for you is a side effect of the way dynamic linking works, namely copy relocations. Basically, what happens is that, since the main executable is not position-independent, it has to have addresses for all ...



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