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16

G++ and Clang are for the vast majority completely ABI compatible. Furthermore, ABI incompatibilities for Standard containers are properties of the standard library implementation (libstdc++ or libc++), not the compiler. Therefore, there is no need for any re-compilation. Clang could never have gotten off the ground if it was not ABI compatible with g++, as ...


16

even for things as core as standard containers Standard containers are not all that "core". (For typical implementations) they are implemented entirely in valid C++ in headers, and if you compile the same headers with G++ and Clang++ you'll get ABI compatible output. You should only get incompatibilities "even for things as core as standard containers" ...


13

This is the only method that works for me. pip install pygame==1.9.1release --allow-external pygame --allow-unverified pygame -- These are the steps that lead me to this command (I put them so people finds it easily): $ pip install pygame Collecting pygame Could not find any downloads that satisfy the requirement pygame Some externally hosted files ...


8

You can do it that way, but it may give you headaches if you ever want Project 1 and Project 2 to use two different versions of the Shared components. Imagine that you need to release Project 1 with the latest shared components, but Project 2 still relies on a previous version of the shared components. What a mess. Some other options: Make the shared ...


6

3. Create multiple exception subclasses: one for each possible occasion an exception can be thrown. This seems like a neat idea but I think it's too excessive to create a subclass for every possible error. This, for the reason you stated: your users can then catch exactly what they want to catch. In short, use exceptions as they were intended to be ...


5

JNAerator has an -arch option designed just for that, although the doc is currently terribly vague about it: java -jar jnaerator-0.12-shaded.jar \ -arch win32 win32/test.dll \ -arch win64 win64/test.dll \ -arch darwin_universal mac/libtest.dylib \ -arch linux_x86 linux_x86/libtest.so \ -arch linux_x64 linux_amd64/libtest.so \ test.h \ -mode ...


5

But if I load the module with an application written in C, it crashes. The C application won't have code to call the initialization routines for the C++ library: streams such as std::cout will be uninitialised. See the FAQ here, specifically: • You must use your C++ compiler when compiling main() (e.g., for static initialization)


5

Yes, a C++ executable can be linked (both statically and dynamically) to a C library. This is completely deliberate. The C++ ABIs are designed to be backwards compatible. You will have to ensure that the declarations of functions and so on of the library symbols, as written in your C++ program, are marked extern "C" to denote that you are crossing a ...


5

You should use assignment operator y=x; std::shared_ptr::reset() expecting a raw pointer as parameter std::shared_ptr::swap() exchange the ownership of shared_ptrs without changing the std::shared_ptr::use_cout() of either.


5

A header-only library, as the name hints, is only made of headers. That actually means you don't have to link against binaries, because the whole code of this library is contained in headers, and this code will be compiled when you include them in your project. This kind of libraries is sometimes the only way, for example when dealing with templates.


5

But, When I set a static variable in libGetData.so library from Application A. Its is not reflecting in Application B. Correct. My goal is if I use a shared library in any Application and if I set any static variable in that library. Same thing should reflect on an-other application which is using same library. No, that's not how shared libraries ...


5

As keltar saied, LTO doesn't affect shared libraries. But... LTO works with static libraries Just replace ar by gcc-ar and add the option --plugin gccpath/liblto_plugin.so. This LTO plugin will copy the declarations, types, callgraph and GIMPLE representation from LTO-compiled objects into the static lib. (same for ranlib to be replaced by gcc-ranlib) In ...


5

Difference Between .o, .a, .lo and .so. Executive Summary .o is typically a non-PIC object file emitted by the compiler (before linker stage) When linked with an exe, the code will be included in the executable -- we bind at link time. .a is typically an archive library containing one or more .o files [non-PIC]. When linked with an exe, the particular ...


5

The Sum extension method uses a double to accumulate the result and only casts to float to return it, so it's more precise than using float: public static float Sum(this IEnumerable<float> source) { if (source == null) throw Error.ArgumentNull("source"); double sum = 0; foreach (float v in source) sum += v; return (float)sum; }


4

The problem is that by default, the absolute path to any dynamically linked libraries in non-standard locations is not included in the final build. Assuming you are using Linux and gcc, you can either fix the problem at compile time by passing additional flags to the linker to store the full path: prefix the configure command above with ...


4

This might clarify it (from here): (Update: I didn't include the exact same link to be snarky. I missed the link in the original question. :P) /* The rather clumsy cast above is necessary because the ISO C standard does not require that pointers to functions can be cast back and forth to 'void *'. (See TLPI pages 863-864.) SUSv3 TC1 and SUSv4 ...


4

.a is an "archive". Although an archive can contain any type of file, in the context of the GNU toolchain, it is a library of object files (other toolchains especially on WIndows use .lib for the same purpose, but the format of these is not typically a general purpose archive, and often specific to the toolchain). It is possible to extract individual ...


4

I have an app that does this too (pulls data from multiple APIs) so I can tell you what I would did (or in some cases what I would do now if I was to start over). Data Storage First off if you are already persisting the data pulled from those into a Rails app, then you will have models representing the data themselves. So that's what you would refer to in ...


4

Neither Perl nor Neko are going to help you consume this 32 bit library in your 64 bit process. Were you to try to use either Perl or Neko you would just be injecting even more layers in between your two modules. You will need to use IPC of one form or another. There are many ways to do that. You could create a 32 bit C# host process for the 32 bit library, ...


4

You can use an option: option(MYLIB_BUILD_STATIC "Build libraries as static libraries" ON) # add/create library if (MYLIB_BUILD_STATIC) add_definitions(-DMYLIB_STATIC_BUILD) add_library(${PROJECT_NAME} STATIC ${SOURCE_FILES}) else (MYLIB_BUILD_STATIC) add_library(${PROJECT_NAME} SHARED ${SOURCE_FILES}) endif (MYLIB_BUILD_STATIC)


4

You could implement your 'different prefix' solution by excluding extmod.c from your your build and instead treating it as header file in a way. Use the C pre-processor to effectively modify the file without actually modifying it. For example if extmod.c contains: void print_hello() { printf("hello!"); } Exclude this file from your build and add one ...


4

If you are on Linux then possibly you should use ldd --unused: $ ldd --help Usage: ldd [OPTION]... FILE... -u, --unused print unused direct dependencies This is an example: $ ldd -u ./a.out Unused direct dependencies: /u01/app/oracle/product/11.2.0/cl11203/lib/libclntsh.so.11.1 ...


4

Okay. I spent a entire day on it. Basically, the link between /dev/raw1394 and /dev/null is not permanent. You can bash into your VM, call ln /dev/null /dev/raw1394, but it will last only until you re-start your container. What I had to do, that seemed to be the simplest, but not the perfect approach, is to place the linking during the startup of the ...


4

It is not possible to link shared library into kernel code (ELF shared objects are a user-space thing, using ld-linux(8)...) You should consider making a kernel module (and use modprobe(8) to load it). Read Loadable Kernel Module HowTo. kernel modules *.ko are conceptually similar to shared objects *.so but the linking mechanism is different. Also, the API ...


4

It is not always about the compilation flags, I have the same error on gentoo when using distcc. The reason is that on distcc server is using a not-hardened profile and on client the profile is hardened. Check this discussion: https://forums.gentoo.org/viewtopic-p-7463994.html


4

How this can be achieves depends on whether you just want it to be thread safe when accessed by Java level threads, or you need to synchronize native threads with Java threads. There are two ways to synchronize only Java level threads: 1.The easiest way is to add the synchronized keyword to the native methods that be accessed by multiple thread, i.e. ...


4

It's a Supplier<T> - it takes nothing, and supplies with T. And the abstract method it defines is nice to be called get() interface Supplier<T> { T get(); } Note that in Java8, this (@FunctionalInterface) already exists (it's called Supplier), so if you run your code under Java8, there's no need to define a custom interface. Also, if you ...


4

In file Makerules of glibc: # Give libc.so an entry point and make it directly runnable itself. LDFLAGS-c.so += -e __libc_main And in csu/version.c extern void __libc_print_version (void); void __libc_print_version (void) { __write (STDOUT_FILENO, banner, sizeof banner - 1); } This is called by __libc_main(). In file elf/interp.c a program ...


3

My answer came somehow late. I have already build a windows static library from nginx source and using the configuration file delivered with. You have to remove nginx.c file from Makefile build rule. Then you must make sure your MAIN function does the same as nginx.c main function. It's a little awkward to integrate Nginx in other project because it was ...


3

This is just one of those things that Windows does better.. You don't need a tool and it gives more information about and it's easy to retrieve.. There isn't much use case in "knowing" whether a specific module was loaded or not. It's either you loaded it, or you didn't. #include <windows.h> #include <tlhelp32.h> #include <vector> ...



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