New answers tagged

0

This is the corrected code after Ctx answer. I also found out THIS that is useful to understan why longjmp is not the right solution with signals. #include <sys/types.h> #include <sys/stat.h> #include <fcntl.h> #include <unistd.h> #include <stdio.h> #include <sys/mman.h> #include <semaphore.h> #include ...


0

a few minutes with the debugger shows the program crashes on the call to sem_wait(). if, after the call to sem_open() insert: if( SEM_FAILED == mutex ) { perror( "sem_open failed" ); exit( EXIT_FAILURE ); } then move the statement: sem_unlink(SEM_NAME); to before the statement: mutex = sem_open(SEM_NAME, O_CREAT | O_EXCL, ...


0

For this to work you need to use a custom allocator that will allocate from the shared memory region, so that the map nodes are all in shared memory, and so that the pointer type of the allocator is not just a raw pointer but can refer to the shared memory region when it is mapped to different addresses in different processes. You also need your std::map ...


1

If you want to proceed if the modification doesn't work, you can install a signal handler for SIGSEGV and use (sig)setjmp/longjmp to continue execution at a defined point: #include <setjmp.h> #include <signal.h> #include <stdlib.h> #include <stdio.h> jmp_buf env; void segvhandler(int arg) { siglongjmp(env, 1); } void ...


2

Per the mmap() man page: Use of a mapped region can result in these signals: SIGSEGV Attempted write into a region mapped as read-only.


3

Manager.dict will give you a dict where direct changes will be propagated between the processes, but it doesn't detect if you change objects contained in the dict (like the list stored under "list_item"). See the note at the bottom of the SyncManager documentation: Note: Modifications to mutable values or items in dict and list proxies will not be ...


1

No. For starters, "shared memory" are actually shared pages. Your malloc call is by no means guaranteed to return page-aligned memory. Furthermore, those shared pages must be created in a free region of your virtual address space, but malloced memory is backed by allocated and unshared pages.


0

My same problem got solved from @anio's answer but I needed to do additional work. As I cannot comment due to low reputation. So I am presenting my pennies, may be someone find it helpful. I am baby stepping everything, so "sorry" if I seem childish. I am using Eclipse on Debian for cross compiling for arm-linux-gnueabihf-g++. So I first found the location ...


0

Easiest way to share members between different c modules is to use headers files. You could add a modulea.h file to your project like: #ifndef modulea_H_ #define modulea_H_ extern int a; extern int b; extern char t[]; #endif Then you can #include "modulea.h" in your moduleb.c source file.


4

Yes, technically it is possible, simply use extern. However, there is no reason why you should ever do that. If you ever come up with a need to access (non-constant) variables in another file, then that means that your program design is broken. And if you go through with extern, it will become even more broken, you'll get complete spaghetti code with ...


-2

How to share existing memory? Don't share existing memory. Get some (small amount of) "fresh" shared memory and use (i.e. fill or read) it later. Assuming you are on Linux, read shm_overview(7). I guess that some of your functions might fail. You should test against failure each call, e.g. int fd = shm_open(SHM_NAME, O_CREAT | O_RDWR | O_EXCL, ...


0

I wrote an open source library for just this purpose: rszshm - resizable pointer-safe shared memory To quote from the description page: To accommodate resizing, rszshm first maps a large, private, noreserve map. This serves to claim a span of addresses. The shared file mapping then overlays the beginning of the span. Later calls to extend the ...


3

Your problem is that interfaceConnection is a local variable in your main function. interface *interfaceConnection; I am assuming you want this at the global scope. Its hard to tell without seeing the other code.


1

Not 100 %, As per your question you want to maintain your own memory region. so you need to go for your own my_malloc, my_realloc and my_free Implementing your own my_malloc may help you void* my_malloc(int size) { char* ptr = malloc(size+sizeof(int)); memcpy(ptr, &size, sizeof(int)); return ptr+sizeof(int); } This is just a ...


0

It is not very hard to implement your own my_alloc and my_free and use preferred memory range. It is simple chain of: block size, flag free/in use, and block data plus final-block marker (e.g. block size = 0). In the beginning you have one large free block and know its address. Note that my_alloc returns the address of block data and block size/flag are few ...


0

Iam using Tasking and I can store data in a specific space of memory. For example I can use: testVar _at(0x200000); I'm not sure if this is what you are looking for, but for example I'am using it to store data to external RAM. But as far as I know, it's only workin for global variables.


1

As best as I understand you need to grow (or shrink) the existing memory mapping. Under linux shared memory implemented as a file, located in /dev/shm memory filesystem. All operations in this file is the same as on the regular files (and file descriptors). if you want to grow the existing mapping first expand the file size with ftruncate (as you wrote) ...


0

to unmap the shared memory mapping from process address space use system call shmdt(shared memory start virtual address) but to delete the shared memory segment use shmctl() with IPC_RMID or ipcs command. Shared memory segment data structures are maintained inside Linux kernel so deleting shared memory segment means removing or freeing the data structures ...


0

Yes. But this was not true when you asked the question. Jemalloc 4 (released in August of 2015) has a couple of mallctl namespaces that would be useful for this purpose; they allow you to specify per-arena, application-specific chunk allocation hooks. In particular, the arena.<i>.chunk_hooks namespace and the arenas.extend mallctl options are of use. ...


2

"[T]he children shouldn't have the permission to open the shared memory on their own" implies that this is a security boundary, so shared memory is probably not appropriate. There are all sorts of odd synchronisation issues involved with shared memory, and you really want all users to play nicely with each other. shm_open() is little more than a helper ...


2

shmdt() reverses the shmat()-operation. shmat: Maps the shared memory segment in a processes address space shmdt: Unmaps it again shmctl (segment_id, IPC_RMID, 0); marks the segment for deletion, this means, it is the counteroperation to creating the shared memory segment with shmget(..., IPC_CREAT). If the reference counter is 0 when deleting, the ...


0

You get v(t) = -A*w*sin(w*t+d) and you know v(0)=-Aw*sin(d) as well as v(t) for t=0.1. v(t) = x'(t) = -A*w*( cos(w*t)*sin(d)+sin(w*t)*cos(d) ) so that -A*w*cos(d) = ( v(t)-cos(w*t)*v(0) ) / sin(w*t) and then conversion to polar coordinates will give you the values for A and d.


0

The very short answer is that just the mere act of using shared memory won't impart a performance improvement. The act of reading from global memory to shared memory, then from shared memory - which is what is described in the question - has no benefit effect on performance whatsoever and is a common misconception (mostly the fault of the programming guide, ...


3

You need to extend the size of the shared memory mapping, at least the first time when you create it. Right now its size is 0, and mmap is not going to allow you to make a zero length mapping. So instead of your fstat() call, do e.g.: size_t len = 4096; if (ftruncate(fd, len) == -1) { perror("ftruncate"); return 1; } And pass this len to mmap().


-3

Your addr parameter is set to 0, which might be reserved. Did you mean to use NULL? This would be different than 0.


0

Between the mmap module and numpy.frombuffer, this is fairly easy: import mmap import numpy as np with open("matrix_file.mtx","rb") as matfile: mm = mmap.mmap(matfile.fileno(), 0, access=mmap.ACCESS_READ) # Optionally, on UNIX-like systems in Py3.3+, add: # os.posix_fadvise(matfile.fileno(), 0, len(mm), os.POSIX_FADV_WILLNEED) # to trigger ...


1

Use both the flags IPC_CREAT and IPC_EXCL when allocating the shared memory or semaphore in the first place. The shmget command will fail if there already is a shared memory segment with the given key. Repeatedly try to get a shared memory segment with new random keys until you succeed. Now you have to figure out the way to communicate the key you used to ...


2

Maybe you know that there is function ftok that let you obtain a key from a filepath. So the problem of having a "personal" key is to find a "personal" file. It is guaranteed to have different keys for different files. An idiom could be to create a temporary file (with the help of tmpnam?), or to create a file hidden in some private directory and use it with ...


0

Have you tried setting the buffer sizes to 0 and/or flushing the pipe after a write?


1

Here is a minimal example: Python import os import posix_ipc import numpy as np x = np.arange(1000, dtype='i4') f = posix_ipc.SharedMemory('test', flags=posix_ipc.O_CREAT, size=x.nbytes, read_only=False) ff = os.fdopen(f.fd, mode='wb') ff.write(x.data) ff.close() # flush doesn't work, but this does. C // shm.c #include <stdlib.h> #include ...


0

When you pass bigset as an argument, it is pickled by the parent process and unplickled by the children processes.[1][2] Pickling and unpickling a large set requires a lot of time. This explains why you are seeing few processes doing their job: the parent process has to pickle a lot of big objects, and the children have to wait for it. The parent process ...


2

As far as I know, there is no way to retrieve the size of an existing file mapping or file mapping view. You are expected to track this information yourself. MSDN states that VirtualQueryEx is capable of doing such thing. No, all VirtualQueryEx can determine is the number of pages reserved for the view. That means that the result is always rounded up ...


3

The QSharedMemory is for creating a shared memory between processes, not for memory mapping a file. (See the official Qt example). For a memory mapped file, you can simply use the .map() function on a QFile, e.g. QFile file("MyFile"); if (!file.open(QIODevice::ReadWrite)) { //handle error } uchar *memory = file.map(0, file.size()); if (memory) { ...


1

QSharedMemory is more suited to attaching to SysV shared memory objects. It sounds like you're looking more for a C++ wrapper around memory-mapped files (judging from the names of the functions you quote - I don't know any Windows APIs). I've had success in the past using boost::iostreams::mapped_file_source (for a read-only mapping of the file): // ...


0

Another solution is to wrap your variable in a "persistent data" class that will automatically restore its data content every time the php script is run. Your class needs to to the following: store content of variable into file in __destructor load content of variable from file in __constructor I prefer storing the file in JSON format so the content can ...


6

You can mmap() shared and anonymous memory region by providing MAP_SHARED and MAP_ANONYMOUS flags in parent process. That memory will be accessible only to that process and its children. As memory segment is anonymous, no other processes will be able to refer to it, let alone access/map it: void *shared_mem = mmap(NULL, n_bytes, PROT_READ|PROT_WRITE, ...


4

The shared seg doesn't belong to a process, it belongs to a user. Effectively settings 0600 only allows that user for RW (and root), however any other process running as this user will have the same access. Create a specific user, to be "used" (logged in) only for this purpose. Is it a good idea to have secret data in a shared memory segment? Think of ...


4

One option is to use IPC_RMID (see this). This options marks the shm segment for cleanup after the last process attached to it disappears. For semaphores, you can look at robust mutexes. It does require you to code for an extra error case (when a process holding the mutex dies). You also have the option of using file locks, which are released if the ...


1

An outline of a possible server initialization: Open pid file w/O_EXCL | O_WRONLY if success write pid close Open shm w/O_CREAT done open pid file w/O_RDONLY read pid Use kill(0) to see if server alive If yes, exit If no, remove pid file Close pid, start at top again Pid files are usually located in the /var/run dir and are named foobar.pid where foobar ...


2

This link contains a detailed analysis of the sequential and the parallel algorithms for parallel prefix sum. http://http.developer.nvidia.com/GPUGems3/gpugems3_ch39.html It also contains a fragment of the C codes for the implementation of the parallel prefix algorithm and a detailed explanation for avoiding the shared memory conflicts. You can either ...


2

Not as such. Sharing memory like this in the general case is very tricky. The CPython interpreter does not relocate objects, so they would have to be created in situ within the shared memory region. That means shared memory allocation, which is considerably more complex than just calling PyMem_Malloc(). In increasing order of difficulty, you would need ...



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