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93

The problem is the linker is looking for libmagic.so but you only have libmagic.so.1 A quick hack is to symlink libmagic.so.1 to libmagic.so


42

As just formulated by grepsedawk, the answer lies in the -l option of g++, calling ld. If you look at the man page of this command, you can either do: g++ -l:libmagic.so.1 [...] or: g++ -lmagic [...] , if you have a symlink named libmagic.so in your libs path


23

You have to distinguish between finding so's at compile-time and at run-time. The -L flag you give at compile-time has nothing to do with localizing the library at run-time. This is rather done via a number of variables and some paths embedded in the library. The best hot-fix for this problem is often setting LD_LIBRARY_PATH to the directory with the .so ...


22

use nm -D --defined-only libname.so to get the symbol names from your dynamic library. The --defined-only switch shows you only the symbol that are defined in these files, and not references to external functions. An alternative is to use objdump, and catch only the symbols in the text section : objdump -T /usr/lib/libjpeg.so | grep text ... 0001b5c0 g ...


21

There are two ways of loading shared objects in C++ For either of these methods you would always need the header file for the object you want to use. The header will contain the definitions of the classes or objects you want to use in your code. Statically: #include "blah.h" int main() { ClassFromBlah a; a.DoSomething(); } gcc yourfile.cpp -lblah ...


21

It is Debian convention to separate shared libraries into their runtime components (libmagic1: /usr/lib/libmagic.so.1 → libmagic.so.1.0.0) and their development components (libmagic-dev: /usr/lib/libmagic.so → …). Because the library's soname is libmagic.so.1, that's the string that gets embedded into the executable so that's the file that is loaded when ...


16

If you are building the code from source that needs the the library, you can put the path that the library is in in the environment variable LD_RUN_PATH before building, and the linker will save that path into the binary, so that it will automatically be looked for in the right place at runtime. Linux specific: Alternately, put the library in /lib, ...


11

I think nm -D is what you're looking for. $ nm -D /usr/lib/libpng.so ... 00000000000058f0 T png_reset_zstream 000000000000d420 T png_save_int_32 000000000000d450 T png_save_uint_16 000000000000d3f0 T png_save_uint_32 0000000000007810 T png_set_IHDR 0000000000007500 T png_set_PLTE 000000000000ce20 T png_set_add_alpha 0000000000006670 T png_set_asm_flags ...


10

In this case, you need to write your Bitmap to a ByteArray (in other words - binary data) before you set your shared object. Then you need to read it from a ByteArray into a bitmap when you retrieve it. Here is a quick sample the hopefully will get you moving in the right direction: http://www.kirupa.com/forum/showthread.php?t=306972


10

I tinkered with this some more, and got lots of goofy results trying to let the serialization "just work", so I finally just implemented the IExternalizable interface, and that fixed it. public function readExternal(input:IDataInput):void { var hashCount:int = input.readInt(); for (var i:int = 0;i<hashCount;i++) { var prop:Object = ...


10

Try: g++ -fPIC -rdynamic -o testexe testexe.cpp -ldl Without the -rdynamic (or something equivalent, like -Wl,--export-dynamic), symbols from the application itself will not be available for dynamic linking.


10

IO.so is the binary component of IO. The modules of this distribution are also part of the perl distribution (i.e. they are dual-lived). This type of error usually occurs when using a binary compiled using one version of Perl is used by an older version of Perl.


9

I highly highly recommend using the LSB app / library checker. Its going to tell you quickly if you: Are using extensions that aren't available on some distros Introduce bash-isms in your install scripts Use syscalls that aren't available in all recent kernels Depend on non-standard libraries (it will tell you what distros lack them) And lots, upon lots of ...


9

One problem is you need to use Process.wait to wait for your forked processes to complete. The other is that you can't do interprocess communication through variables. To see this: @one = nil @two = nil @hash = {} pidA = fork do sleep 1 @one = 1 @hash[:one] = 1 p [:one, @one, :hash, @hash] #=> [ :one, 1, :hash, { :one => 1 } ] end ...


7

As AProgrammer said, while executing setuid programs, $LD_LIBRARY_PATH is ignored. Hence the path has to be hardcoded in the executable itself using this flag while linking gcc -R $home/lib The -R flag builds runtime search path list into executable. Reference: http://www.justskins.com/forums/loading-shared-libraries-from-a-setuid-program-116597.html


7

The string which you initialized with the characters "bye", and whose address you keep taking and assigning to charP, does not get re-initialized after the first time. Follow the advice here: You should be careful, however, not to pass them to functions expecting pointers to mutable memory. If you need mutable memory blocks, ctypes has a ...


7

Java .class files and .jar archives will fulfil this requirement, as will .Net assemblies running under Mono.


7

You've basically bumped into the singleton pattern. For the most part, it's a bad pattern. By allowing any part of your app to access essentially global data like this at just about any time, you end up with a spaghetti mess of code that's hard to maintain, debug, and most of all, test. I think it is better to create a "Context", that contains the current ...


7

The usual solution is to declare the functions extern "C". This not only causes the names to be mangled as in C, but also for the function to use the C calling conventions.


7

No, there is no equivalent to DllMain. For JNI libraries, e.g. on Android, there may be a special entry JNI_OnLoad which is intended to fill JNI function table. GCC defines special attribute constructor to allow some code to run on shared library load. C++ guarantees that the constructors for global and static objects will be performed, no matter if the ...


7

You can use the __attribute__((constructor)) and __attribute__((destructor)) to execute code on load and unload of the shared library.


6

You can store any object in a SharedObject, but you need to register the class first: You can store typed ActionScript instances in shared objects. You do this by calling the flash.net.registerClassAlias() method to register the class. If you create an instance of your class and store it in the data member of your shared object and later ...


6

Assuming your using gcc - Append -Wl,-E when you build the executable calling dlload(). This exports all type info symbols from the executable, which should allow the RTTI (when catching the exception) to work properly. VC++ uses string compares to match typeinfo, results in slower dynamic_cast<> etc but smaller binaries. g++ uses pointer compares. I ...


6

There is no library because using dlsym or GetProcAddress is so simple that it is not worth to be factored out in a separate library. But it is a part of many libraries. Heres a quick Copy&Paste from the FOX GUI Toolkit: void* fxdllOpen(const FXchar *dllname){ if(dllname){ #ifndef WIN32 #ifdef HAVE_SHL_LOAD // HP-UX return ...


6

A universal executable format? No. That's the whole reason for the existence of virtual machines (java) or IL (.Net) - so the same source code can be compiled into a universal intermediate language, that can then be executed by the framework in the underlying system bytecode without the programmer having to know the differences between the systems. In ...


6

What about this, or am I thinking too simple? struct PluginInfo2: public PluginInfo { public: std::string s_License; }; In your application you are probably passing around only pointers to PluginInfos, so version 2 is compatible to version 1. When you need access to the version 2 members, you can test the version with either ...


6

You're looking at the source code of a wrong thing: ld doesn't do program and library loading. Instead, you should look at the source code of dlopen and dlsym functions found in libc. Also, you should look at the source of the dynamic linker: ld-linux.so (the true name varies with the platform; execute ldd /bin/ls to find out where the dynamic linker ...


5

you don't need to write anything on the server side in order to do a chat in as3 and red5; here is an example for you the chat that it is working and it is written in as3/flex3


5

Either your plugin is compiled with the same version of C++ compiler and std library source (or its std::string implementation may not be compatible, and all your string fields will break), in which case you have to recompile the plugins anyway, and adding fields to the struct won't matter Or you want binary compatibility with previous plugins, in which ...



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