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3

You could use a custom deleter for the shared_ptr that deletes the object and also removes it from the map: class custom_object_deleter { public: custom_object_deleter(unordered_map<int, custom_object*>* map) : map(map) { } void operator()(custom_object* object) { // Remove object from map. delete object; ...


0

As far as I can tell, the code that you've presented compiles fine: http://ideone.com/06RB2W #include <memory> class Base { public: Base() = default; virtual ~Base() = default; virtual void run() = 0; }; class Derived1: public Base { public: Derived1() = default; virtual ~Derived1() = default; ...


2

unique_ptrs are not assignable but moveable. I reworked your example and now works with unique_ptrs. Notice, that I use std::move in order to move contents from one unique_ptr to another. Also due to the fact that unique_ptr isn't copyable, I pass unique_ptrs in member functions by reference and not by value: #include <iostream> #include ...


2

Template-flavored errors always tend to be horrible, but don't panic ! All these "use of deleted function" are about you trying to copy a unique_ptr, which gets its superpowers from being movable-only. Jump to each of these lines, and analyze the situation : Do you wish to transfer ownership of the pointee ? Then pass the unique pointer by rvalue reference ...


1

You are trying to access the protected method outside of the class hierarchy. You would need to make it a public method for this to work.


0

First, iterators contains only a pointer to container element, not element itself. So no matter it was weak_ptr or not. So if you remove element from a container, iterator can become invalid. This means it can point to trash memory, freed memory, not-your-memory, another element (not which you think) and so on. This is error-prone way and will lead to ...


8

The function's signature isn't shown, but it sounds like it's probably returning shared_ptr<Recipe>&. Returning a reference to a temporary is a big no-no since the referenced object will be destroyed as soon as the function exits. Just return by value instead.


7

When you store the owner in the Recipe using another shared pointer, you create a cyclic reference, meaning, the Recipe will only be deleted when the User is deleted, but the User will only be deleted when all Recipes are deleted. You should use weak_ptr in Recipe to break the cycle. This is because shared_ptr uses simple reference counting to determine ...


5

As said previously by Mike, you'll have to specify your deleter with shared_ptr. For a unique_ptr, however, you'll probably want to create a special type for your deleter so that it can be cleanly used as a template parameter. I used this struct: struct SDLWindowDeleter { inline void operator()(SDL_Window* window) { SDL_DestroyWindow(window); ...


0

shared_ptr has to store the reference counting variable somewhere. It is likely allocated from the heap and the shared_ptr contains a pointer to this variable. It is entirely possible that having to access this variable will cause cache operations unless care has been taken to put them in the same chunks, which is highly unlikely. If you are worried about ...


1

Give myclassptr a constructor (and probably assignment operator too) which accepts a std::shared_ptr: class myclassptr : public std::shared_ptr<myclass> { public: // some special tracking methodes myclassptr(std::shared_ptr<myclass> arg) : std::shared_ptr<myclass>(std::move(arg)) {} myclassptr& operator= ...


5

The A objects are deleted after you print global to cout.


3

libc++ appears to implement the optimization. See the difference between __shared_ptr_pointer and __shared_ptr_emplace in http://llvm.org/viewvc/llvm-project/libcxx/trunk/include/memory?revision=210211&view=markup. libstdc++ also appears to implement it. See the difference between _Sp_counted_ptr and _Sp_counted_ptr_inplace in ...


1

Drew Dormann nicely answered the first few questions. I'm just adding a few things. First, you should really only use shared_ptr if you actually need shared ownership semantics. Reference counting has overhead and if you do not correctly break up cyclic dependencies, it will cause memory leak, so you shouldn't do it unless you actually need it. In this ...


1

Welcome to Stack Overflow! You have a somewhat messy collection of several questions, but I will do my best. What i am unsure about is if either of them creates a new vector on the stack for the caller? This creates an entire new vector. vector<RectangleRef> rectangles() { return rects_; } This avoids the copy. vector<RectangleRef> ...


0

No deep copy is made but the constructor of SampleConsusModel internally calls its setInputCloud method which stores (as expected) the pointer to the cloud and resizes the set of indices of the points to use to the current size of the cloud (to 0 in your case). So the pointer is correct but the model uses 0 indices for the cloud it is pointing to. As a ...



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