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0

The variable is not initialized when used inside the initializer list. Look what happens: #include <memory> #include <string> #include <vector> #include <iostream> using std::shared_ptr; using std::string; using std::vector; struct Rule { string name; vector<vector<shared_ptr<Rule>>> rules; Rule(string ...


4

The value shown for weak is not the number of weak_ptr objects that exist, it is the "weak count". The typical shared_ptr implementation (originating in Boost) stores two counts in the control block, a strong count, S, which is the number of active shared_ptr objects and a weak count, W, which is the number of active weak_ptr objects + (S != 0) So if there ...


3

You should copy the class directly, i.e. EventPacket eventPacket; // Do stuff EventPacket copy = eventPacket; as your class can be copied without any further operation. Indeed, the compiler generates a copy constructor (aptly called implicit) when you don't specify one, if possible (i.e. if your class can be trivially copied, which is the case here as ...


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but I'm not sure whether the shared pointers were copied properly such that they remain shared pointers in the copied object They were. Copying a shared_ptr increases it reference count by one, so in your example deleting copy will not release the events yet, but once ep also gets deleted they will. Keep in mind that a cloned EventPacket ...


1

Copying the list will copy the shared pointers, sharing ownership of the Event objects. They will be deleted when removed from both lists. The implicit copy constructor and assignment operator will do this. In your code, that happens via assignment in *copy = *this. In more sensible code, EventPacket copy = ep; the copy constructor copies all the shared ...


5

Most likely because glfwCreateWindow allocates the data using malloc, and std::shared_pointer free the memory using delete. Those are two different memory allocation systems, and should not be mixed. Besides, you can't just free the pointer returned by glfwCreateWindow, you need to close the window properly, because you have no idea what other data may have ...


0

To expand on what others are saying, when you give a raw heap allocated pointer to a shared_ptr, you are giving the shared_ptr control over the lifetime of the resource. shared_ptr keeps a reference count of how many shared_ptrs are pointing to a resource. When that count is 0 the resource is cleaned up. adaptee (std::shared_ptr<Adaptee>(a)) Here, ...


0

The principle of the shared_ptr is to manage the deletion of the pointed object when it's no longer used. When you create the shared_ptrin your adapter, it takes ownership of the object and sets the use count to 1. When the adapter is deleted, so is the shared pointer. THe use count (that you can display with use_count()) is hence automatically ...


1

In the first case, the line delete adapter; did nothing to adaptee. It is still a valid pointer. In the second case, the same line calls the destructor of the shared_ptr, which deallocates the memory pointed to by adaptee. Hence, adaptee is not a valid pointer and you can expect undefined behavior if you dereference it.


3

Because in the second case Adaptee instance is deleted by the destructor of shared_ptr when you delete adapter as it's the last shared_ptr owning that object. See the doc. If you want to keep the adaptee alive after you delete adapter, you should wrap it into shared_ptr from the start: class Adapter { private: std::shared_ptr<Adaptee> ...


4

I can find no rationale for the warning. Nor can I replicate the warning with clang/libc++. In general, given a shared_ptr<Bar>, without seeing the construction of shared_ptr<Bar> that takes a Bar*, and optionally a deleter, there is no way to know for sure if ~Bar() is ever called. There is no way to know what deleter was stored in the ...


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No; the warning cannot safely be ignored. Your code creates a shared_ptr object. The shared_ptr constructor is a template that creates and stores the deleter. By adding code to create a shared_ptr in your header, you wound up prematurely instantiating the template constructor. The deleter trick used by shared_ptr allows you to declare them before ...


3

With C++11, one possible way to do that now is to use aliases (which are cleaner imo than macros). E.g. for shared pointers, you could do: template<typename T> using Shared = std::shared_ptr<T>; Then, use it like the following: Shared<int> myInt; // Is in fact a std::shared_ptr<int> EDIT: Live example.


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Without more code, it's hard to say, but one clear possibility is that you have a cycle. Just using std::shared_ptr everywhere is going to lead to problems sooner or later; it's a useful tool for specific cases, but it isn't going to solve all of your problems.


1

There is nothing wrong with constructing a shared pointer in the way you showed. Looks like the leak detector is reporting fake leaks or you are using it in the wrong way. As a side note consider using std::make_shared instead of explicit new and shared pointer constructor - it is generally more efficient and safer.


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The first version of GetSelection is better for the vast majority of cases. This version can be const and doesn't need extra synchronization code to be thread-safe. In generic library code where the exact usage pattern cannot be predicted in advance, the first version is still preferred. However in a situation where synchronization code is already in place ...


4

It should be noted, first off, that the emplacement strategy of std::make_shared is optional, i.e. the standard does not mandate that implementations perform this optimization. It's a non-binding requirement, which means that perfectly conforming implementations may elect to forego it. To answer your questions: Given that you seem to have only one ...


7

Both of these cases are invalid uses of std::shared_ptr. You cannot pass the same raw pointer to two std::shared_ptr constructors and expect well-defined results. Both std::shared_ptrs will believe that they own that pointer, and will attempt to delete it when they go out of scope. This is a double free, and is invalid. If you want to have two ...


3

This is undefined behavior, we can see this by going to cppreference section for std::shared_ptr constructors says this (emphasis mine): Constructing a shared_ptr using the raw pointer overload for an object that is already managed by a shared_ptr leads to undefined behavior, even if the object is of a type derived from std::enable_shared_from_this ...


3

All this stuff about shared_ptr is just a red herring. You have pointer to a const object that has a pointer to a non-const object. You can of course modify the latter object.


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I think you're misunderstanding how const works with pointers. const T * doesn't declare a const pointer, it declares a pointer to const. I.e. the pointer is mutable, but the thing(s) it points at are not. When you add const to a pointer, you actually get T * const, which is a const pointer to mutable object(s), i.e. you can still change the pointee ...


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You can do: boost::shared_ptr<char[]> sp(new char[100]); But you'll need to manually keep track of the size (100 in this case).


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Weak pointers don't claim ownership of a resource, but only refer to it. Thus, they don't allow you to operate on a resource in any way except claiming the ownership once again (with the weak_ptr::lock() method). IMHO, the most frequent real-life situations where such a behaviour is desires are cyclic dependencies and (less frequently) caching. Cyclic ...


3

See also: When is std::weak_ptr useful? for why and How does weak_ptr work? for how. I'll provide an example of how I've seen it used, though the sample code I whipped up is a bit convoluted so bear with me: #include <vector> #include <memory> #include <ostream> int main() { // Fill container with values 1-50. This container OWNS these ...


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No, remember that weak_ptrs are just observers rather than an actual pointer to the object they are not designed to return their counts.


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No it is not. The layout of boost::shared_ptr<T> might not be the same on both sides of the DLL boundary. (Layout is influenced by compiler version, packing pragmas, and other compiler options, as well as the actual version of the Boost source code.) Only "standard layout" (a new concept in C++11, related to the old "POD = plain old data" concept) ...


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Not in C++11, and not in this draft of C++14.


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Down in the guts of the implementation, the std::atomic ctor you're calling must be assigning its internal pointer with something like: std::atomic(T* ctorInput) { memcpy(myPtr, ctorInput, sizeof(T)); } What this means is that it doing a direct copy on the bytes, bypassing any real copy constructor "T(const T&)". That's why it only works correctly ...


6

You are using pointers to shared pointers. That doesn't make sense. Replace all std::shared_ptr<Element>* with std::shared_ptr<Element> and you'll be fine.


3

Your code is undefined because after the call to deletion of the raw pointer, the shared_ptr is left with a dangling pointer reference. You then proceed to dereference the already freed memory (undefined behavior 1). When the shared_ptr goes out of scope, it will call delete on the pointer it was told to manage, which is freeing already freed memory ...


2

sharped_ptr is no magic. It simply calls delete once the last shared_ptr to an object is destroyed. Thus, your code calls delete twice, once when you delete str_1 and then when str_ptr goes out of scope. Thus, using a shared_ptr doesn't change anything in comparision to calling delete twice explicitly: The result is undefined behaviour. shared_ptr was ...


0

Scoped_ptr has little in common with shared_ptr, weak_ptr, or unique_ptr because it is only doing very special case of "reference counting". It isn't something you will need very often in well-designed code, but it is a good tool to have available. Basically, a scoped_ptr isn't a reference-counted thing at all. Rather, it is an object you create on the ...


1

The canonical approach to store a file would be a std::vector<uint8_t>. If your program operates on a single dataset at a time that should be sufficient. After construction of your MainWindow class the vector would just be empty until you decide to load a file (I think that's what you wanted to express by saying a normal member seems difficult to ...


3

The code at the bottom of my example is obviously wrong The code there is not obviously wrong, the bug is in getLinkedList which gives ownership of this to a shared_ptr causing it to be deleted when the printList returns and the last shared_ptr object goes out of scope. So the last line of the example is rather non-obviously wrong, because the previous ...


3

So, Martin has one option for fixing a destructor problem. You could add a virtual destructor. However, because you're using std::shared_ptr, which employs a bit of type erasure, you could do a smaller fix: std::shared_ptr<CrossSection> Factory::create(const std::string& type) { if (geom == "circular") return ...


2

You definitely need to define a virtual destructor in your CrossSection base class in order to use polymorphism, i.e. in order to declare derived classes and use them in place of the parent class (so generally almost everytime you want to use derived classes ...) class CrossSection { public: virtual ~CrossSection() { /* Nothing to do here ... */ } }; ...


1

Possibly the simplest solution. Based on the previous answer by Mohit Aron and incorporating dlf's suggestion. #include <memory> class A { public: static std::shared_ptr<A> create() { struct make_shared_enabler : public A {}; return std::make_shared<make_shared_enabler>(); } private: A() {} };


0

The whole point of a shared pointer is that its ref counted, and destructs what it points to when the last one go out of scope. You don't want that to happen to a member object of another class, since that is undefined behaviour. in short; don't do that.


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If you can guarantee that h will live longer than b_ptr, then you can use the borrowing constructor of shared_ptr, together with a cast: Holder h; std::shared_ptr<B> b_ptr(std::shared_ptr<B>(), &static_cast<B&>(h.getSomething())); Now b_ptr shares ownership with the temporary, empty shared pointer, which ...



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