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18

What to protect against and what not to protect against: Keep in mind that people will always find a way to get around your trial period. So you want to make it annoying for the person to have to get around your trial period, but it doesn't matter if it's impossible to get around you trial period. Most people will think it's too much work to try and get ...


16

This is a standard feature in most licenses. A few samples from various Free- and Open-Source licenses: GNU GPL v3: THERE IS NO WARRANTY FOR THE PROGRAM, TO THE EXTENT PERMITTED BY APPLICABLE LAW. EXCEPT WHEN OTHERWISE STATED IN WRITING THE COPYRIGHT HOLDERS AND/OR OTHER PARTIES PROVIDE THE PROGRAM “AS IS” WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, ...


12

Allan Odgaard - using openssl for license keys is one way to do it.


12

Look at this blog post, it's a survey made by Andy Brice on small software vendors. Here you can find the trial types and its % of use. http://successfulsoftware.net/2009/04/23/the-truth-about-conversion-ratios-for-software/ I recommend you the Business Of Software Forum: http://discuss.joelonsoftware.com/default.asp?biz Regular posters there seem to ...


9

Probably not what you want to hear, but I wouldn't do it that way. There is nothing more annoying than a timer-based nag screen when you're evaluating software. And I don't mean annoying as in "it will give me a reason to buy a non-nag version of your software". I mean annoying as in "I'll never touch that application again". I've done software for ...


8

AquaticPrime is a simple, easy Cocoa licensing framework. It uses securely signed plist's as it’s “license key”, which makes it simple to embed arbitrary information into the license. With AquaticPrime one would generally distribute the license as a small file, rather than as a text string, which may be an advantage or disadvantage for your application. ...


7

Trust your customers to pay the bill. If they want to run your program on two computers at the same time, they will find a way. Make it as easy as possible for your users to use the software. Often, a pirated version of a program is more user-friendly than the legal version. For one thing, the pirated version just keeps working if the license server is ...


6

There are two options: A separate demo and full version. Your ecommerce provider will send the full version to people who buy it. A demo that is unlocked by a registration key or online activation process. Registration keys can be generated on the fly (or taken from a pre-generated list). Ecommerce providers can then send the keys to customers immediately ...


6

It's true that using Google Adsense would be against TOS, but you could roll your own ad-engine. For instance, you could create an Amazon affiliate account, and show books that match keywords in your little advertising space. (anyone who clicked on the book and bought would earn you money per sale) Anything affiliate-based (assuming your keywords lend itself ...


6

Limit to number of uses is the fairest way. As for stopping circumvention... Anyone who wants to crack your software will, and most people are too lazy to circumvent anything but the most trivial usage. I'd argue that you want to get those people who regularly use your software to happily pay for it. They're most likely to happily pay for it if they've ...


6

Why not just hard code an expiry date into the trial program so that you don't have to continue to support it? You could put this in main(). // Die after October 1, 2010 Calendar expireDate = Calendar.getInstance(); // January is 0 (y, m, d) expireDate.set(2010, 9, 1); // Get current date and compare if (Calendar.getInstance().after(expireDate)) { // Die ...


6

You could probably come up with a system that requires an internet connection, but without something that the user can't tamper with, I don't see a solution. Any solutions that rely on an untrusted element (an element of the protection that is under the user's control) is critically weak. The simplest way I can think of to protect against the user moving ...


5

With regards to a random-generated key, how will you verify a key is legit or if a key is bogus if it is actually random? Have a look at the article "Implementing a Partial Serial Number Verification System" as it is quite good and is easy to implement in any language. With regards to time trials, as basic solution would be to compare your main executable ...


5

There is no effective way to lock down an application, period. You can make it more difficult for users to use the program without a valid license from you, at the risk of creating false negatives, which can become a PR nightmare very quickly in the Internet age. There are two ways to go about doing this. You can create some sort of DRM lock built into ...


5

Speaking of Wil Shipley, he has made his in-application payment and registration framework available for licensing under the name of Golden % Braeburn. I believe that Delicious Library and SousChef both use this framework.


5

Many people will only need this tool once in a lifetime for an import of some data. So you will definitely have to go to a limited version instead of a time version.


5

My preferred method of limiting trial versions is through watermarking. This method works great for software that is used to produce content. E.g. my own HelpScribble and DeployMaster are used to produce help files and installers. The trial versions of these products create help files and installers without any restriction in time or functionality. But ...


4

Probably the only way is an Internet-based "software as a service" application. If you don't provide access, they're not using the software. If it is a desktop-based application, then some key piece of functionality would still have to be on an online server somewhere. If the hacker has the entire application on their local machine, it can be reverse ...


4

You can query the uptime of the computer through WMI. See here for more info. And here is how to do it in C#.


4

It is common for software during the trial period to lack (or limit) some significant feature, such as printing or saving. I've tried (and bought) a panorama assembly tool that put a large watermark across the finished image. It allowed the quality of the tool to be evaluated, but put a real limit on further use of the images created during the evaluation ...


4

The reason it uses license files is to make it cryptographically hard to make up licenses—you can't just write a keygen like you can with license numbers. You can make this easy by making a custom file type for license files in your application's Info.plist. (This must be app-specific. When you begin your second product, you'll need to make a new type.) ...


4

I created a "self-modifying" EXE by appending a data record to the end of my compiled application. The first thing my application did was get the machine id and the bios date from the computers memory. I would then compare these to the machine id and bios date stored in the appended data record. Seek to end... back up XX number of bytes... read to end. This ...


4

I would just do something really simple and just hard enough such that non-programmers wouldn't be able to figure it out. I would something like write to a file the number of milliseconds when the program was first installed in a 64-bit long in binary to a file. And have your main class check and enforce the time limit. Yes people can change their clocks ...


4

The problem with trying to limit the dates is that the naive solution of just checking the date is easily fooled if the person sets back their system clock. I worked with a guy who kept a VMWare virtual box just for running time limited software. A better approach would be to record the time of the last time it was run, and if the time ever goes before ...


4

Here is an idea: Create a database (such as a SQL Server database) that is publicly available on the web. It will keep a list of "trial version" license keys. You can use the same system for full-version license keys when your product is purchased. When your Java software is first run, it'll cause a trial license to be created which will be stored in the ...


4

If this is an app that will be used for a long time, go with 30 days non-nag (show "trial" in the titlebar and AboutBox, etc., but nothing that needs clicking), then nag for 7 days, then use an escalated crippling. Maybe some watermarking of the output. You probably do not need to fully disable the app. In order for the purchase/abandon decision to tip in ...


4

Here's a discussion on Shareware trial enforcement with Delphi: Best Shareware lock for Delphi Win32 Along with discussions on various 3rd-party solutions, techniques for DIY, etc.. IMO, DIY is feasible if your app produces data that the user will want to keep around, then you can simply embed a copy of the usage/day counter in the database in such a way ...


3

Don't ship your full product as a demo that can be activated. This way you don't eliminate piracy (which will still be something you will have to deal with) but at least you remove the possibility of someone just downloading the demo, cracking it, and spreading it around (or even just a cracked executable). They would at least have to buy the full version ...


3

This has been asked already in many places: 1) http://stackoverflow.com/questions/109997/how-do-you-protect-your-software-from-illegal-distribution 2) http://stackoverflow.com/questions/104291/trialwarelicensing-strategies


3

Whatever you do, keep a keen eye on the system date. The oldest trick in the book is to install an application at some point in the future and then return to the real date once the application stored the silly date on first run. Maybe synchronise the key with a online repository ?



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