Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

8

Try Pcap.Net instead. Here is how you build a simple IPv4 packet with specific source and destination addresses and a custom payload in Pcap.Net: Packet packet = PacketBuilder.Build(DateTime.Now, new EthernetLayer { Source = new MacAddress("11:22:33:44:55:66"), ...


7

As the author of SharpPcap I can say that you'll be able to perform all of those operations with the library. Performance was a critical design goal. Packet.Net has a range of packets that it can parse and is the library bundled along with SharpPcap for packet dissection and generation. It's architecture does lazy evaluation anywhere it is possible in order ...


6

SharpPcap is already able to capture packets in the same manner that wireshark does (just in code rather than a GUI). And you can either parse them directly or you can dump them to the drive in the common .pcap file format. The steps to parse a capture are: Pick an interface Open a connection in promiscuous mode Start capture either using a while loop or ...


6

Was simple enough. packet.PayloadPacket.PayloadPacket.PayloadData


5

Personally I would stick to WinPCap. But since you asked, it is possible to sniff packets from the network using for the following code to enable raw sockets. Socket s = new Socket(AddressFamily.InterNetwork, SocketType.Raw, ProtocolType.IP); s.Bind(new IPEndPoint(IPAddress.Parse("<IP Address Here of NIC to sniff>"), 0)); ...


5

What version of SharpPcap are you using? I'm moving a small in-work project from 2.1.1 to 2.4.1, and parts of the library have changed significantly. I struggled with this myself just a bit ago. LivePcapDeviceList devices = LivePcapDeviceList.Instance; foreach (LivePcapDevice device in devices) { // Do stuff here... }


4

When making a call to a control from another thread: if (listView1.InvokeRequired) { listView1.BeginInvoke(new MethodInvoker( () => /*whatever you want with listview */)); } else { /* whatever you want with listview */ } If you know for sure that it will always be on another thread, then just forget the if/else and use the invoke. ...


4

Sorry about the API changes. I'm still trying to get the API named properly. As of v3.0 the API is considerably cleaner and should be a bit more static going forward. If you have any trouble post on the devel list or sf forums and you'll get a quick reply. Chris SharpPcap maintainer/author http://sharppcap.sf.net


4

What I think is happening here is that you're actually only checking every other packet. You don't need the second packet = device.GetNextPacket(); because packet is already being assigned at the top of your while loop. Try this and see if you still get an exception: private void packetCapturingThreadMethod() { Packet packet = null; while ((packet ...


4

A SharpPcap.RawPacket is used to hold the raw data captured over the network adapter but PacketDotNet needs the packet parsed before the GetEncapsulated() methods will work. The step you need will look like: var packet = PacketDotNet.Packet.ParsePacket(rawPacket.LinkLayerType, rawPacket.Data); Then you can extract the encapsulated TcpPacket via the ...


3

Solution: Packet pack = Packet.ParsePacket(packet.Packet); TcpPacket tcpPacket = TcpPacket.GetEncapsulated(pack); DateTime time = packet.Packet.Timeval.Date; int len = packet.Packet.Data.Length; if (tcpPacket != null) { IpPacket ipPacket = (IpPacket)tcpPacket.ParentPacket; IPAddress srcIp = ipPacket.SourceAddress; IPAddress dstIp = ...


3

There is a way to capture incoming/outgoing packets on .NET using just the standard winsocks implementation. I've seen a blog with example of how but I don't have the link anymore. Long story short, it's an extreme edge case because that's not what winsocks (the standard windows networking driver) was intended for. The reason Pcap is usually necessary to ...


3

tcpPacket.PayloadData or PayloadPacket should be what you want. PayloadData is valid if Packet.Net isn't aware of how to parse the data into a sub-packet, and PayloadPacket is valid if it does. I'm not sure any tcp packet parsing occurs today so you should be safe saying tcpPacket.PayloadData. Maybe the api should be changed such that PayloadData is always ...


3

The entire functionality is available in Pcap.Net. Pcap.Net uses C++/CLI to wrap WinPcap, which is considered more efficient than PInvoke. The packet library in Pcap.Net is quite big and complex packets can be parsed and created. This includes recursive layers like IP over IP. Parsing of each layer is done lazily and only when you need it. For your needs, ...


3

The WinPcapDevice class contains a property called Addresses. This property holds all addresses (IP) associated with the device: string localIPAddress = "..."; WinPcapDeviceList devices = WinPcapDeviceList.Instance; foreach(WinPcapDevice dev in devices) { Console.Out.WriteLine("{0}", dev.Description); foreach(PcapAddress addr in dev.Addresses) { ...


3

That exception means that either udp, udp.ipv6 or udp.ipv6.TrafficClass is null. You need to check: if (udp != null && udp.ipv6 != null && udp.ipv6.TrafficClass != null) { MessageBox.Show(udp.ipv6.TrafficClass.ToString(); }


3

According to rfc2616 - Hypertext Transfer Protocol -- HTTP/1.1: The version of an HTTP message is indicated by an HTTP-Version field in the first line of the message So, you could inspect packets and scan for the HTTP version text in message headers, and/or other known fields of the HTTP protocol. Although this method may not be 100% accurate if a ...


3

You need to use Invoke because the packet is coming in on a different thread. UI controls cannot be modified on a thread other than the one they're created on. Invoke will execute the given delegate on the UI thread. For example, you could do this: this.Invoke(new MethodInvoker(() => listViewPackets.Items.Add(e.Packet.ToString())), null);


3

Yep. SharpPcap uses Packet.Net, http://packetnet.sf.net, as it's packet dissector. Most common packet types are being processed. If you find one that isn't just let me know or open a feature request on the Packet.Net sourceforge tracker. Sharppcap and Packet.net are also designed to be as fast as possible. You should be able to capture and process at ...


3

You're absolutely right, Pcap.Net didn't support it. I've just submitted a Change Set to add support for this, so the next version of Pcap.Net will have support for such packets built in. More details in the relevant discussion in Pcap.Net forum.


3

public static void ARP(IPAddress ipAddress , LivePcapDevice device) { if (ipAddress == null ) throw new Exception("ARP IP address Cannot be null"); var ethernetPacket = new PacketDotNet.EthernetPacket(device.Addresses[1].Addr.hardwareAddress, PhysicalAddress.Parse("FF-FF-FF-FF-FF-FF"), PacketDotNet.EthernetPacketType.Arp); var arpPacket = new ...


3

SharpPcap, and the lower level libraries libpcap/winpcap, are designed to observe and capture network packets. They don't have the ability to alter packets before they are transmitted, or to block incoming packets (such as a firewall might do). There may be a way to disable network adapters or networking via c#, a quick serach on google turned up this page, ...


2

Nope. libpcap/winpcap/airpcap provide observation of packets in the system but are not at the level of firewalls in that they aren't given access to the packet stream as it is coming in/out of the network adapter. There are other pieces of software that are likely to provide support for doing just what you want, and you could still use Packet.Net with them ...


2

You just found a bug! WinPcapDevice was creating a new SendPacketArrivalEvent() instead of overriding it. Modified PcapDevice.SendPacketArrivalEvent() to be a virtual and WinPcapDevice.SendPacketArrivalEvent() to be an override and now the correct method is called. The issue was that because WinPcapDevice was creating a new method instead of overriding it ...


2

You should look at using the UDP protocol instead of TCP/IP. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User_Datagram_Protocol Here is the code for the client: using System.Net; using System.Net.Sockets; ... /// <summary> /// Sends a sepcified number of UDP packets to a host or IP Address. /// </summary> /// <param name="hostNameOrAddress">The host ...


2

Doing as you describe is impossible, as Chris Morgan pointed out in his answer. Reasons are as follows: HTTP protocol (for practical purposes - always) works over TCP connection TCP connection must perform a handshake (3-packet mutual exchange - client->server->client->server) before actual data can start flowing Due to the handshake, substituting the HTTP ...


2

I am the author/maintainer of sharppcap/packet.net. I have a few classes that perform tcp reassembly and http parsing that are in use in a complex network monitoring app to identify and follow http sessions. These are fully unit tested and well commented. They are available for licensing either at the binary or source level. Edit: Why vote this down? It ...


2

Decoding a TCP stream into HTTP request/response pairs is non-trivial. Tools like WireShark do this with considerable effort. I wrote a WireShark wrapper for Ruby (not that that will help you), but before I wrote it I tried using tshark (the command-line version of WireShark). That didn't solve my problem but it may work for you. Here's how: You capture ...


2

I would look at the packet detectors in Wireshark, which can decode most common protocols available.


2

If you need an alternative for SharpPcap, you can use Pcap.Net. All you need to do is build an EthernetLayer, ArpLayer and use the PacketBuilder to build a packet and send it. It's simple, straight forward and easy to do.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible