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0

POSIX shell script, and paste. paste ifile[12].txt | \ while read a b c d e f g ; do \ [ "$b$f" -eq "$b$f" ] 2> /dev/null \ && echo $(( b - f )) \ || echo '?' ; \ done Output: 3 ? ? 5


0

If two pipelines are separated by `&&', the second pipeline is executed only after the first succeeds (returns a zero status).


0

The same works in ksh too. Consider foo.ksh is : foo() { echo "Bar" if [ "$1" = "die" ] then unset -f foo fi } Consider main.ksh is : source foo.ksh foo die foo # you haven't checked if the function is unset or not Gives you : bar --> first call main.ksh[10]: foo: not found [No such file or directory] --> second call Check ...


0

If you want to take multiple user inputs, put all the inputs into a list, and then print out the list, try this: listX = [] #An empty list for x in range(y): #Where y in the number of times you want the user to enter the input listX.append(raw_input("Your message here: ")) print listX If you want to to print out the members of ...


2

$ awk 'NR==FNR{a[NR]=$2;next} {print ((a[FNR]$2)~/?/ ? "?" : a[FNR]-$2)}' file1 file2 3 ? ? 5


0

This can easily be done by using backspace. Following is the sample code that will print the percentage on the same line. import time print "Work in progress(0%%)", # Python 2 print without newline for work_done in range(10): print "\b\b\b\b\b%2d%%)" % work_done, # Backspace then overwrite time.sleep(1)


2

Try the following: threshold=20 prevLineCount=$threshold while IFS= read -r fname; do [[ $fname =~ ([0-9])\.csv$ ]] # match the last digit before the .csv suffix if (( ${BASH_REMATCH[1]} % 2 == 0 )); then # even sedScript='p;p;p' (( prevLineCount < threshold )) && sedScript='p;p' sed -n "$sedScript" "$fname" else # odd ...


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for python 2.7 you can use, print 2%, 3% # Using comma will print it in same line for python 3.x print('2%', end=" ") Or you can use sys.stdout.write for doing it with sys.stdout.flush() Please check my below code, I have created a demo progress bar. """ProgressBar Module.""" import sys import time class ProgressBar(object): """Main class for ...


1

One approach is to use the ANSI escape-code "\033[F" for going to the beginning of the previous line. The following worked well in all my terminals, just writing to the next two lines from the current terminal position: import time import sys progress_1 = 'Process 1: {}%' progress_2 = 'Process 2: {}%' print print for i in range(100): ...


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You can write a simple loop and break with some specified command. For example break_command = 'q' values = [] while True: i = raw_input("Type a number (or q to exit): ") if (i==break_command): break values.append(i)


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When the user press enter after the 1 raw_input stops reading. Take a look at this question to see how to read multiple lines Raw input across multiple lines in Python


0

A POSIX-compliant shell script is restricted to integer arithmetic using the shell language ("only signed long integer arithmetic is required"), so a pure shell solution must emulate floating-point arithmetic: item=30 total=70 percent=$(( 100 * item / total + (1000 * item / total % 10 >= 5 ? 1 : 0) )) 100 * item / total yields the truncated result of ...


0

raw_input() echos the text entered by an user, including the trailing newline. That means whatever the user has typed will be returned to standard output. Possible solution http://stackoverflow.com/a/36210179/2666859


0

for file2get in a b c d; do do :; until curl --fail $file2get; done Or add an iterator counter to prevent endless looping


0

From the Emacs manual: Emacs sends the new shell the contents of the file ~/.emacs_shellname as input, if it exists, where shellname is the name of the file that the shell was loaded from. For example, if you use bash, the file sent to it is ~/.emacs_bash. If this file is not found, Emacs tries with ~/.emacs.d/init_shellname.sh. So for zsh you would ...


1

POSIX shell, (no bashisms). When the size of the number doesn't matter, (i.e. the number is less than 19 digits or so), use the "-eq" test operator, which fails if a string is not an integer. Here's a "readbetween" script to use that: #!/bin/sh # Usage: readbetween n1 n2 # inputs one line from standard input between (and including) n1 and n2 unset s n ...


0

The following is based upon my second answer, but with expr and back-ticks -- which (while archaic and perhaps abhorrent to most) can be adapted to work in all shells natively: item=30 total=70 percent=`expr 200 \* $item / $total % 2 + 100 \* $item / $total` echo $percent 43


2

You can just run following command periodically: wget -r -nc --level=1 http://mrms.ncep.noaa.gov/data/2D/RotationTrackML1440min/ It will download recursively whatever is new in the directory after last run.


1

Give this a try: ( MYVAR=42; export MYVAR ; ./1.sh | 2.sh | 3.sh | ... | n.sh ) The shell creates a first subshell to execute scripts in the ( ... ) MYVAR is then only defined inside the subshell, and it is visible to all scripts. Its lifetime is the same as the first subshell. Anychange to MYVAR during execution of one of the 1.sh... n.sh script is not ...


1

$ cat tst.awk BEGIN { FS=",[[:space:]]+"; OFS="," } function dt2secs(dt) { return mktime(gensub(/[-:]/," ","g",dt)) } function secs2hms(s) { return sprintf("%d:%02d:%02d hrs",s/(60*60),(s/60)%60,s%60) } { print $1, secs2hms(dt2secs($3)-dt2secs($2)) } $ awk -f tst.awk file P1,4:25:20 hrs P2,4:25:11 hrs


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Put it all into ( ./1.sh | 2.sh | 3.sh | ... | n.sh ) parenthes and set all variables to your taste after the opening ( - ( ) is a subshell and thus after the end, nothing from the environment is left - no need to "remove" anything.


0

sed -nr 's/.*are ([0-9]+) thread.*/\1/p' file -r, --regexp-extended use extended regular expressions in the script. -n, --quiet, --silent suppress automatic printing of pattern space


1

You can use sed to capture the number between "There is/are " and " thread" and remove everything else, like this: sed 's/.*There is\/are \([0-9]\+\) thread.*/\1/' file


0

Everyone just forgot disown. So here is a summary: & puts the job in the background. Makes it block on attempting to read input, and Makes the shell not wait for its completion. disown removes the process from the shell's job control, but it still leaves it connected to the terminal. One of the results is that the shell won't send it a SIGHUP(If ...


1

If you want to print a number of seconds in HH:MM:SS syntax, you'll need to do the computation yourself. Using printf will prove useful if you want to print, for example, 4:02:30 instead of 4:2:30. For example, secs = d2 - d1; printf "%s, %d:%02d:%02d hrs.\n", $1, int(secs/3600), int(secs/60)%60, secs%60


1

Single quotes may be preventing interpolation of the variable. Try this as a sample: export var="http://www.google.com/" curl "$var"


0

I think awk is better suited for this: % cat gen.awk ip && $1 == "DOMAIN_LOCAL" {$3 = '"' ip '"'} dm && $1 == "DOMAIN" {$3 = dm} 1 And all together: env=LOCAL ip=http://127.1.1.2:3000 if [ "$env" = LOCAL ]; then awk -v ip="$ip" -v dm="$env" -f gen.awk a.txt else awk -v dm="$env" -f gen.awk a.txt fi This will however not do ...


0

Your commands seem to work find. The problem with your sed commands is that they will just echo. You need to substitute the change in file. #!/bin/bash env=LOCAL ip=http://127.1.1.2:3000 if [ $env == LOCAL ] then sed -i.bak 's~DOMAIN_LOCAL = .*$~DOMAIN_LOCAL = "'$ip'";~' a.txt sed -i.bak 's~DOMAIN = .*$~DOMAIN = '"$env"'~' a.txt # Now this will ...


0

The command sed 's~DOMAIN_LOCAL = .*$~DOMAIN_LOCAL = "'"$ip"'";~' a.txt writes to stdout. When it is finished, you are starting again with the original, unchanged, a.txt. The output of the second statement is the same as the command in the else-clause: sed 's~DOMAIN = .*$~DOMAIN = '"$env"'~' a.txt You can combine the two sed statements in any of ...


0

I was trying with awk in below file : $cat test.txt code;Name;Surname xyz;n1;s1 abc;dd;ff xyz;w;t abc;ft;op It will print the lines that is going to delete .But I am not able to figure out how to delete the line from awk after printing the info . $var=xyz | awk -v var="$var" -F ";" '{ if ($1 == var ) print "FOUND " var " And Going to delete the line" NR ...


0

Combine the 2 sed command into one sed 's~DOMAIN_LOCAL = .*$~DOMAIN_LOCAL = "'"$ip"'";~; s~DOMAIN = .*$~DOMAIN = '"$env"'~' a.txt


1

There's no spaces or odd bits to parse, so sed needs no single quotes here: read var sed -i /"$var"/d file.txt And a demo -- make a list from 1 to 3, remove 2: seq 3 > three.txt; var=2; sed -i /"$var"/d three.txt ; cat three.txt Outputs: 1 3


0

You can have $var or ${var}expanded with read var sed -i '/'${var}'/d' file.txt But what will happen when $var has a space? Nothing good, so use double quotes as well: read var sed -i '/'"${var}"'/d' file.txt


0

The following used awk to search and remove lines which first column is $code. If a line is removed then awk will exit successfully and break will be called. file="input_file" while :; do echo "Enter valid code:" read -r code [ -n "$code" ] || continue awk -F';' -v c="$code" '$1 == c {f=1;next}1;END{exit(f?0:1)}' \ "$file" > "$file.out" ...


0

Also avoid spaces after the backslash \ (trailing spaces), somehow it causes problems with my Cygwin.


1

Try with this header #!/usr/bin/env amm.


0

As @Ansgar mentioned, [[ is a bashism, ie built into Bash and not available for other shells. If you want your script to be portable, use [. Comparisons will also need a different syntax: change == to =.


5

globstar only enables the ** pattern. The extglob option allows !(...). Somewhere in your interactive shell, that has already been enabled (perhaps in your .bashrc, perhaps you typed shopt -s extglob earlier). However, it needs to be enabled explicitly in your script, since such settings are not inherited from the shell that starts the script. ...


1

You can use a pattern: #!/bin/bash unset input shopt -s extglob # For bash < 4.1. until [[ $input == @(0|[1-9]*([0-9])) && $input -le 10 ]]; do read -r input done @ means one of the alternatives must be present, i.e. either 0, or a positive number positive number starts with a non-zero [1-9], followed by any digit (or none) *([0-9]).


0

To allow just numbers for $primeranota : read primeranota [[ $mavar =~ [0-9]*[0-9] ]] && echo numbers To allow numbers in range 1 to 10 : shopt -s extglob # you may have to set extglob to 'on' until [[ $primeranota == @(0|[1-9]|10) ]]; do echo -n "Escribe una nota del [0-10]:" read primeranota done


0

You can use [[ ... ]] in bash: read -r input if [[ "$input" =~ ^[a-zA-Z0-9]+$ ]]; then echo '$input contains 0-9, a-z and A-Z only' fi This allows 0-9, a-z and A-Z one more more times.


0

could you please provide the information which webserver you're using ? If you are using apache you might install libapache2-mod-php7.0 for php7. ToDo this apt comes in handy: apt-get install libapache2-mod-php7.0 or try to activate it sudo a2enmod php7.0 Make sure that the php files are marked executable for webserver user (e.g. www-data) sudo ...


0

transfer testing with tar gzip compression, ssh default compression. using PV for as pipe meter (apt-get install pv) testing on some site folder where is about 80k small images, total size of folder about 1.9Gb Using non-standart ssh-port 2204 1) tar gzip, no ssh compression tar cpfz - site.com|pv -b -a -t|ssh -p 2204 -o cipher=none root@removeip "tar xfz ...


1

I was looking for something like this: http://man7.org/linux/man-pages/man1/time.1.html This is how I used it: $/usr/bin/time -f "%E %M" *<command>* That gave me: %E - elapsed real time (in [hours:]minutes:seconds); %M - maximum resident set size of the process during its lifetime, in kB.


0

I have found that ps -af works the way I want


0

How about random=$(printf "%02x\n" $((RANDOM % 256))) # zsh and bash ? BTW, if you do not need a leading zero for hex numbers less than 10, and if it is OK to use Zsh instead of bash, you can also do in the following way, which doesn't need a $(...) subprocess: random=$(( [##16] (RANDOM & 16#FF) )) # zsh only


1

Use: ps a -o pid,tty,etime,cmd,user From ps manual: SIMPLE PROCESS SELECTION a ... An alternate description is that this option causes ps to list all processes with a terminal (tty), or to list all processes when used together with the x option. STANDARD FORMAT SPECIFIERS Here are the different keywords that may be used to ...


0

The documentation of the shell function (cf. C-h f shell RET) says explicitly: If a file `~/.emacs_SHELLNAME' exists, or `~/.emacs.d/init_SHELLNAME.sh', it is given as initial input. So, you could get what you want by creating a file named ~/.emacs.d/init_*foo*.sh and containing: cd devel/foo source setup.sh And so on for the other files. Beware of ...


1

Just to add to what ritesh has commented: If you are passing parameters at the function call inside your script :- function_name param1 '' param3 '' you can still access positional parameters(function arguments) $2 and $4 inside the function but they will be NULL.


0

I had got same problem and i removed the .gitconfig file from local repository .The prroblem is resolved.



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