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0

Problem arises when working hours overflow one working day. In the case of your code, a day goes from 7am to 7am (morning 7->15, afternoon 15->22, night 22->7). If one works from 22pm to 8am, one works 10 hours the first day and 1 hour the second day. The code propose does not take in account such overflow. A (far form being perfect) fix could be to change ...


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So in the keydrown plugin edit the list under the KEY_MAP, for example add: ,'LSHIFT': 16 LSHIFT+W can be achieved in this way: kd.W.press(function () { kd.LSHIFT.press(function () { //... console.log(); }); //optional... console.log(); }); kd.W.up(function () { kd.LSHIFT.press(function () { console.clear(); ...


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Command: printf "%s %s\n" ${array[@]} Output: d23 d3 d21 d1 d20 d0 d26 d6


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A variation of ooga's version with recursion: a=(d23 d3 d21 d1 d20 d0 d26 d6) pp () { [ $# -lt 2 ] && return echo $1 $2 shift 2 pp $@ } pp "${a[@]}"


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If you have your heart set on using shift note that it only works on the positional parameters, so you could use it in a function: print_pairs () { while [ $# -gt 0 ]; do echo $1 $2; shift 2; done } a=(d23 d3 d21 d1 d20 d0 d26 d6) print_pairs "${a[@]}"


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Just loop through them: a=(d23 d3 d21 d1 d20 d0 d26 d6) $ echo ${#a[@]} 8 $ for (( i=0; i<${#a[@]}; i+=2 )); do echo "${a[$i]} ${a[$i+1]}"; done d23 d3 d21 d1 d20 d0 d26 d6


3

It depends on your context. In all cases, shift removes the element at list index 0 and returns it, shifting all remaining elements down one. Inside a sub, shift without an argument (bare shift) operates on the @_ list of subroutine parameters. Suppose I call mysub('me', '22') sub mysub { my $self = shift; # return $_[0], moves everything else ...


1

It removes the first element from an array and returns it. If @_ contains the elements ("foo","bar",123) then the statement $eg = shift; # same as $eg = shift @_ Assigns the value "foo" to the variable $eg, and leaves @_ containing the elements ("bar",123). This is very much a basic building block of the language. You will frequently see this ...


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Can i solve this way: Let me know if you don't like this solution in comment, I will remove it. ( instead of down-voting ) #!/usr/bin/python alpha = ['A','B','C','D','E','F','G','H','I',\ 'J','K','L','M','N','O','P','Q','R',\ 'S','T','U','V','W','X','Y','Z'] def shift_right(char, shift_inx): dic1 = dict(zip(alpha, range(26))) dic2 ...


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So my way is more basic than TheSoundDefense but it works pretty well when you input three letters like "xyz". (Im guessing you can come up with a check to make sure they did so) The main tool that i use is the index function which will match an item in the list and will give me the placement number for that item. Then I take that number and I add it to ...


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EDIT: I just realized I was probably answering a totally different question, because my brain doesn't understand the word "shift" properly. So instead of generating new letters, I'm generating an entirely new alphabet. Feel free to point and laugh. For handling the out-of-range problem, you'll want to use the modulus function % to make the number "wrap ...


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Python's integers have arbitrary precision, which besides being difficult to spell, means that as you bit shift, it keeps getting bigger. If you want to limit the size, you'd want to do something like temp = long(temp << 1) & (0xffffffff) which should zero out. Edit: Specifically, the & does a bitwise AND; 0xffffffff (8 f's) is 32 1's (in ...


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Use par: #save old settings op <- par(no.readonly = TRUE) #change settings par(mar=c(8, 4, 2, 2) + 0.1) plot(x,y,xaxt="n",main="", xlab ="") axis(1, at=1:40, labels=categories, las = 2, cex.axis = 0.8) #reset settings par(op)


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To get M-> type first the "Alt" key and then the "Shift" key and the "." key at the same time.


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You press those keys as a chord, just like shift-alt-. You can also use Esc as a synonym for the meta key if you prefer that.



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