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8

You can shuffle the Collection and then restore the 7 to the 2nd position : Collections.shuffle(list); list.set(list.indexOf(7),list.get(2)); list.set(2,7); Or shorter : Collections.shuffle(list); Collections.swap(list, 2, list.indexOf(7)); As others suggested, you can also remove the element whose location you wish to preserve prior to the shuffling, ...


6

No, there is nothing bad or inefficient in this. std::random_shuffle only swaps the elements of the cointainer in some random way. std::swap is specialized for std::shared_ptr's, so it is safe and as efficient as swapping two pairs of raw pointers, without lots of reference counts could be going up and down like crazy, impacting performance Even if ...


5

It looks like you forgot the index accessor: string[] newStringArray = new string[10]; for (int i = 0; i < oldStringArray.Length && i < newStringArray.Length; i++) { newStringArray[i] = oldStringArray[i].firstName; // ^ }


5

To easily prevent moving any number of elements simply Remove them from list, shuffle rest of elements, put them back at their original position (start from left to avoid problem with elements shifting to the right).


3

The requirements for std::random_shuffle usage is elements should be ValueSwappable and the container should have a random_access iterator support. std::shared_ptrs are ValueSwappable and std::vector has random access iterators. So it should be safe and it will not make any change in std::shared_ptr::use_count(). ...


3

Your adding an object reference to the list. Think of it as a pointer. Each vec that you add to Matpreferences points to the same instance. Look at this example: >>> vec = [1,2,3,4,5] >>> vec2 = vec >>> random.shuffle(vec) >>> print vec [2, 4, 3, 1, 5] >>> print vec2 [2, 4, 3, 1, 5] >>> As you see, ...


3

Your Permutation constructor takes the engine in by value. So, in this loop: for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) Permutation test(length, generator); You are passing a copy of the same engine, in the same state, over and over. So you are of course getting the same results. Pass the engine by reference instead Permutation::Permutation(int n, ...


3

std::random_shuffle swaps the elements. The default swap, implemented by std::swap, uses both move construction and move assignment. If you don't have a move assignment operator, then the copy assignment operator would be used instead. Since your move constructor does handle d_penalty correctly, it sounds like that your copy assignment operator isn't ...


3

You not checking, if ( 32 - i ) ever gives any value less than 0. The algorithm is called Fisher-Yates shuffling algorithm, which resemble very much like yours: private int [] shuffleMyArray ( int [] array ) { int size = array.length, i = 0; int temp = 0; while ( size != 0 ) { i = ( ( int ) ( Math.random () * size-- ) ); if ( i ...


3

This is going to be long and dry. I have a solution that produces a uniform distribution. It requires O(len(L) * d**d) time and space for precomputation, then performs shuffles in O(len(L)*d) time1. If a uniform distribution is not required, the precomputation is unnecessary, and the shuffle time can be reduced to O(len(L)) due to faster random choices; I ...


3

You can project your FirstName properties using Enumerable.Select, and then materialize them into a new array using Enumerable.ToArray: string[] firstNames = oldStringArray.Select(x => x.FirstName).ToArray();


2

If you change your Card[] into List<Card> instead, you can simply use Collections.shuffle(cards). Otherwise, loop through the array, at each point, swap the current card with a randomly selected card.


2

You can use Random class to create a random value. define a Random variable outside the function. Random r = new Random(); and use it like this if (cb_Shuffle.IsChecked == true) { newIndex = r.Next(dgPlayList.Items.Count); } else { if (newIndex >= (dgPlayList.Items.Count - 1)) { // If the end of the datagrid is reached, set index ...


2

safer shuffle the real keys of an array $keys = array_keys($arr); shuffle($keys); foreach($keys as $i) {


2

There is no method named to_a_shuffle. You need to apply to_a to a range then shuffle that array. @values = (1..number).to_a.shuffle


2

There's an alternative solution which is longer, but probably faster for long lists: public static <T> void shuffleExcept(final List<T> list, final int position) { List<T> view = new AbstractList<T>() { @Override public T get(int index) { return list.get(index >= position ? index+1 : index); ...


2

You have to declare the new array with the same size as the old one. string[] newStringArray = new string[oldStringArray.Length]; Then use the indexer to set the elements of the new array. for (int i = 0; i < oldStringArray.Length; i++) { newStringArray[i] = oldStringArray[i].firstName; }


2

There are many pseudo-random number generating algorithms that use a seed. You can't assume that the one in the Java standard library uses exactly the same algorithm as srandom/random in Objective C. The Java random generator uses: The class uses a 48-bit seed, which is modified using a linear congruential formula. (See Donald Knuth, The Art of ...


2

It might be better to figure out if there is another underlying issue, but the below will do what you want...rather round about way to do it, but it sounds like it will fit your bill: myRDD.map(a => (a._2._1._2, a._2._1._2)) .aggregateByKey(Set[YourType]())((agg, value) => agg + value, (agg1, agg2) => agg1 ++ agg2) .keys .count Or even ...


1

I found this variant hanging out in the "deleted by author" answers on a duplicate of this question. Unlike some of the other answers that have many upvotes already, this is: Actually random Not in-place (hence the shuffled name rather than shuffle) Not already present here with multiple variants Here's a jsfiddle showing it in use. ...


1

Your algorithm is pretty easy to understand, and I believe it is correct. It can be made a little easier to read using Python's built-in Counter collection. from collections import Counter def careful_shuffle(lst): '''Returns a new list based on a given iterable, with the elements shuffled such that the number of duplicate consecutive elements are ...


1

Sort them in order of frequency, then put them into a new array at alternating positions, first working from left to right then from right to left. So in the example you gave, sorted is {b,b,b,b,b,b,a,a,a,c}, then the "every other place" operation takes it to {b,_,b,_,b,_,b,_,b,_}, then we continue to fill in the blanks from the right (or from the left ...


1

In short, the list that should be shuffled gets ordered by the sum of index and a random number. import random xs = range(20) # list that should be shuffled d = 5 # distance [x for i,x in sorted(enumerate(xs), key= lambda (i,x): i+(d+1)*random.random())] Out: [1, 4, 3, 0, 2, 6, 7, 5, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 14, 13, 15, 19, 16, 18, 17] Thats ...


1

My idea is to generate permutations by moving at most d steps by generating d random permutations which move at most 1 step and chaining them together. We can generate permutations which move at most 1 step quickly by the following recursive procedure: consider a permutation of {1,2,3,...,n}. The last item, n, can move either 0 or 1 place. If it moves 0 ...


1

Okay, so the updated requirements are: Fetch all items Ordering is random other than the first item, which should be the last one added Firstly, get rid of your Skip call. You're not trying to skip anything. Just fetch all the products (possibly ordered - see below) into a list. For the randomness part, I'd do that in the calling code, using a modified ...


1

I am not sure how good it is, but maybe something like: create a list of same length than initial list L; each element of this list should be a list of indices of allowed initial indices to be moved here; for instance [[0,1,2],[0,1,2,3],[0,1,2,3],[1,2,3]] if I understand correctly your example; take the smallest sublist (or any of the smallest sublists if ...


1

This is the best practice shuffling method around http://datagenetics.com/blog/november42014/index.html Here's a very rough snippit from my program ArrayList cardsArray = new ArrayList(); cardsArray.Add(0); //generate deck for (int i = 1; i <= 52; i++) { cardsArray.Add(i); } // shuffle object t = ...


1

For starters, I think there's a bug in the pseudocode. In line 4, I believe that there's a bounds error when i = n, since that would ask for a random number between n+1 and n. In what follows, I've corrected this by assuming the code is the following: 1 PERMUTE-WITH-ALL-IDENTITY(A) 2 n = A.length 3 for i = 1 to n 4 swap A[i] with A[RANDOM(1,n)] ...


1

random.shuffle shuffles a list in place, so after each call, contents of vec gets shuffled. Note that vec is a reference to a list, so when you append vec 10 times in a list, it contains the same reference 10 times. All of them holds the same list. That's why you see the same list. vec is indeed shuffled 10 times, but you only see the last permutation when ...


1

You need to make a copy of vec before you shuffle it: import random vec=[1,2,3,4,5] for i in range(5): vec.append(10) Matpreferences=[] for i in range(10): v = vec[:] random.shuffle(v) Matpreferences.append(v) Explanation From your code: a=vec Matpreferences.append(a) Here, a points at the same data that vec points at. Consequently, ...



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