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50

Actually I found the way to do that. Suppose the two windows are number 1 and 2. Use join-pane -s 2 -t 1 This will move the 2nd window as a pane to the 1st window. The opposite command is break-pane


26

Apparently, the "run as administrator" hack does not work anymore in Visual Studio 2010 SP1. Fabian describes a workaround here: Getting Visual Studio 2010 SP1 to run elevated when launching .sln files To sum it up: Backup VSLauncher.exe From within a Visual Studio 2010 Tools prompt, extract the manifest from VSLauncher.exe: mt ...


25

If you are running Vista or Windows 7 with the UAC enabled and have "Run this program as an Administrator" checked on the Compatibility tab for the Visual Studio exe (devenv.exe), you will get this behavior when you try to open a sln file directly from Windows Explorer. One solution is to go to "%ProgramFiles%\Common Files\Microsoft Shared\MSEnv" or ...


25

I'll answer my own question. Comments to the question by Hans Passant and Luke helped. I downloaded Microsoft Visual C++ 2005 Service Pack 1 Redistributable Package MFC Security Update and installed it on the system where I was trying to run C:\foo\foo.exe. The EXE ran fine after this. The installer placed the CRT DLLs in ...


21

The key is to restructure your html to have middle last, remove the float from the middle and replace it with overflow: hidden. View fiddle example. HTML <div id="left" > left </div> <div id="right" > right </div> <div id="middle"> middle </div> CSS #left { width: 200px; float: left; } #middle { ...


11

You can specify a custom diff command: svn --diff-cmd "diff" --extensions "-y" diff (Or then perhaps even use tools like sdiff)


8

While I'm pretty sure that Christopher's answer and code sample (thank you, Christopher!) is part of a more elegant solution, we were under the gun to get this out the door and found a very similar, but different, solution. The first step is to create a manifest for the assembly: <assembly xmlns='urn:schemas-microsoft-com:asm.v1' ...


8

A starting point for understanding side-by-side assemblies and what they're for would probably be the "Isolated Applications and Side-by-Side Assemblies" reference on MSDN. Essentially, side-by-side assemblies are a way to ensure that a given application will always use a specific version of a DLL, particularly Windows system DLLs (such as the Common ...


8

Yes. MVC 2 and MVC 3 are completely independent.


8

Yes, they're ordered by priority. It's easiest to try that with a simple console app: using System; class Test { static void Main() { Console.WriteLine(Environment.Version); } } Compile that with .NET 3.5, then run it with your current configuration, and it'll show 4.0 - then switch the lines and it'll show 2.0. See this MSDN article ...


7

If you specify that you want to statically link the run-time (/MT or /MTd) you should be good. Project Properties->C/C++->Code Generation->Runtime Library


7

You should be able to get away with just changing the top-level productcode and UpgradeCode GUIDs to make your two products completely unrelated, and use the Productversion to identify the version. You can share component guids between products (that's how merge modules work) so that the guts of your installer (component definitions) needn't be tweaked and ...


6

It does work, but there are things that can break it (as I have found out). Apparently, if your application is a WinForms application, and it uses Application.EnableVisualStyles command to use visual styles provided by the OS, and at the same time uses manifest files to create an activation context, then you are in a pickle. It seems (according to this) ...


6

You have no CRT runtime DLL on the target machine. To avoid this you can install VC9 redistributables or you can link your program with the runtime statically (more info). This question could be helpful also.


6

You definitely can embed a manifest in a .net dll. The contents of an application manifest do not all apply to an assembly, but some do. For example, the UAC entries don't make sense for a component manifest, but assemblyIdentity does. Using the MT.EXE tool, you can embed a manifest into a dll: Embed: mt.exe -manifest filename.dll.manifest ...


6

The assemblyIdentity element is always required, part of the manifest plumbing. You must always provide the comClass element, it substitutes the HKLM\Software\Classes\CLSID registry key and is used to make the client's CoCreateInstance() call work. The file element names the COM server executable file. The rest of the keys are optional, they are needed to ...


5

I found the solution. The encoding specified in the MyCompany.MyProduct.WinUI.exe.Config is not supported. <?xml version="1.0" encoding="iso-8859-1"?> I changed the encoding to utf-8, and everything work fine... <?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>


5

From Microsoft: Applications can control the location from which a DLL is loaded by specifying a full path, using DLL redirection, or by using a manifest. If none of these methods are used, the system searches for the DLL at load time as described in this topic. So yes, if a manifest is present, it will directly go to the SxS folder.


5

sxstrace will tell you exactly what is going on with respect to SxS. It will show what dlls are searched and how they are mapped to actual versions. Now, which runtime is loaded is coming from the manifest file that gets included in your project. Looking at the one you mention, it looks like the one from Visual2005, with no service pack. SP1 changed the crt ...


5

It depends which gets loaded first, because (prior to .NET 4) you can only have one version of the runtime loaded into a process. Either the .NET 1.1 object loads first, and the .NET 2.0 object falls over; or the .NET 2.0 object loads first and the .NET 1.1 object hopefully works. You should probably consider upgrading the .NET 1.1 object to run on 2.0. If ...


5

You need to use sxstrace.exe to determine the actual cause of the error, as the (complete) error message text tells you to do. Here's what it is wrong: INFO: Parsing Manifest File C:\Temp\sxs\Project1.exe.Manifest. INFO: Manifest Definition Identity is Project1.exe,processorArchitecture="x86",type="win32",version="1.0.0.0". INFO: ...


5

This looks like you're runnning a 32-bit compiled Matlab app on a 64-bit Windows machine, and it's not finding the 32-bit Visual C++ runtime it's linked against. (On 64-bit Windows, 32-bit applications run in a 32-bit subsystem and are linked against 32-bit versions of their libraries.) IIRC, the MCR installer for earlier versions may not install all of its ...


5

To add to the already existing answers: with .NET 4.0, it's actually quite simple to consume a C# dll in your VBA project without registering the COM. EDIT: I just tried this with the mscorlib.tlb and mscoree.tlb that are in C:\windows\Microsoft.NET\Framework\v2.0.50727-- loading an assembly compiled in 3.5-- and it worked just fine. So apparently you don't ...


5

Yes. You can install and run multiple versions of the .NET Framework on a computer. You can install the versions in any order. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/y549e41e%28v=vs.90%29.aspx For your first question, you could also take a look at MSDN documentations and compare those, but having .NET 3.5 might not hurt if you are planning on using ...


4

My level of concern is very low. The only way in which the 3.5 framework will interact with existing 2.0 applications is due to the service pack applied to the 2.0 CLR during the 3.5 install. Namely service pack1. So after the install all of your previous apps will start running on CLR 2.0SP1 vs. CLR 2.0. So really this is a question of how much ...


4

I'm not sure exactly what behavior you're seeing for VS2005, but it shouldn't be the case that "most of the Visual Studio used .NET 2.0 but I was able to make use of an assembly targeting .NET 4.0 framework". That config should cause everything in the process to run on v4. If this is not the case, I'd certainly like to know about it because it's likely a ...


4

You will need to rebuild (not exactly true, check update) the .NET 3.5 application to target .NET 4.0 because by default it will start in the .NET 2.0 runtime which will then not support the plugin. If the machine only has .NET 4.0 framework installed the application will not run unless rebuilt to target it specifically. Update: Well, you don't need to ...


4

Found the correct redistributable patch here. This was an update sent to VS2005 users, but not to the general public. sigh, oh well.



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