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35

Every so often I see a question on SO which forces me to spend half an hour editing a really bad Wikipedia article. The article is now only moderately bad. In the part that bears on your question, I wrote as follows: In computer science, a function or expression is said to have a side effect if, in addition to producing a value, it also modifies some ...


35

The other answers are looking at it from a technical point of view (i.e. what's the best way to modify a list), but I would say the (much) more important reason people are suggesting e.g. slicing is that it doesn't modify the original list. The reason for this in turn is that usually, the list came from somewhere. If you modify it, you can unknowningly ...


26

First off, as you may or may not be aware, some languages, including Haskell, implement sharing, which alleviates some of the problem that you might think of. While Andrew's answer points at Turing completeness, it doesn't really answer the question of what algorithms are hard to implement in functional languages. Instead of asking what algorithms are hard ...


26

Don't use list comprehensions to perform side-effects - that is not Pythonic. Use an explicit loop instead: for i in range(0,len(a),2): a[i] = 3 Apart the side-effects in list comprehensions being surprising and unexpected, you are constructing a result list that you never use which is wasteful and completely unnecessary here.


22

This has nothing to do with Python; global variables are bad in any programming language. NOTE: *global constants* are not conceptually the same as global variables; global constants are perfectly fine to use. It's just that in Python there is no syntactic difference. The reason they are bad is that they allow functions to have hidden (as in "non-obvious" ...


20

What alternatives are there to monads for I/O in a pure functional language? I'm aware of two alternatives in the literature: One is a so-called linear type system. The idea is that a value of linear type must be used exactly one time: you can't ignore it, and you can't use it twice. With this idea in mind, you give the state of the world an ...


20

Side effects are a necessary evil, and one should seek to minimize/localize them. Other comments on the thread say effect-free programming is sometimes not as intuitive, but I think that what people consider "intuitive" is largely a result of their prior experience, and most people's experience has a heavy imperative bias. Mainstream tools are becoming ...


19

In theory the point of pure in D is that it's supposed to allow guarantees that a function is side effect free regardless of how that function is implemented. There are two kinds of purity in D: All functions marked pure are weakly pure. They may not access any global mutable state (global variables, thread-local variables, static variables, etc.) or ...


19

This answer is a bit of an over-simplification, but if we define side effects as computations being affected by previous computations, it's easy to see that the Functor typeclass is insufficient for side effects simply because there is no way to chain multiple computations. class Functor f where fmap :: (a -> b) -> f a -> f b The only thing a ...


18

No, this is not possible in principle in Scala, as the language does not enforce referential transparency -- the language semantics are oblivious to side effects. Your compiler will not track and enforce freedom from side effects for you. You will be able to use the type system to tag some actions as being of IO type however, and with programmer discipline, ...


18

If I gather in one place any three theorists of my acquaintance, at least two of them disagree on the meaning of the term "referential transparency." And when I was a young student, a mentor of mine gave me a paper explaining that even if you consider only the professional literature, the phrase "referentially transparent" is used to mean at least three ...


17

You can't do exactly that in Python 2.x, but you can use a trick to get the same effect: use a mutable object such as a list. def closureMaker(): x = [0] def closure(): x[0] += 1 print x[0] return closure You can also make x an object with a named attribute, or a dictionary. This can be more readable than a list, especially if ...


17

Most real-world functional programming is not "pure" in most senses, so half of the answer to your question is "you do it by giving up on purity". That said, there are alternatives. In the "purest" sense of pure, the entire program represents a single function of one or more arguments, returning a value. If you squint your eyes and wave your hands a bit, ...


17

The idea is that when a class is auto-loaded, the state of the application should not change. Any state-modifying code (code that actually executes) should be in a different set of files. This makes it predictable and forces you to keep your logic in class methods, and implicit. Remember that coding standards exist so people code in a similar style. The ...


16

This is not a bug, as in nearly all programming languages C# evaluates && lazily - if the left operand is already false, the whole expression can never become true, so it's not required anymore to evaluate the right operand of the expression. Flip the operands or change to success & SynchronizeAccount to force evaluation of both operands. Note ...


16

In von-Neumann machines, side effects are things that make the machine work. Essentially, no matter how you write your program, it'll need to do side-effects to work (at a low level view). Programming without side effects means abstracting side effects away so that you could think about the problem in general -without worrying about the current state of ...


14

The final modifier only means that the reference cannot be reassigned. It does not prevent the object's state from being modified. EDIT: Just for Tom: public void doSomething1(Object arg) { arg = new Object(); // OK. } public void doSomething2(final Object arg) { arg = new Object(); // Compile error. } In both cases both cases you can invoke ...


14

Where does "launch the missiles" come from historically? Good luck with that—it's more of a research question than a programming one. Here are two data points: I have heard Simon Peyton Jones use the exact phrase as an example in talks at least ten years ago. In the early 1990s, maybe even in 1990, Computer Professionals for Social ...


14

This design pattern is called Lazy initialization and it has legitimate use.


14

I think nearly every disadvantage of side-effects is tied to "interaction with other portions of the program". Side-effects themselves aren't bad (as @Gabe says, even a pure functional program is constantly mutating RAM), it's the common-side-consequences of effects (non-local interactions) which cause problems (with ...


14

It is not true that Functors don't have effects. Every Applicative (and every Monad through WrappedMonad) is a Functor. The main difference is that Applicative and Monad give you tools how to work with those effects, how to combine them. Roughly Applicative allows you to sequence effects and combine values inside. Monad in addition allows you to determine ...


14

No, a side effect is not necessarily observable behaviour. Modifying a non-volatile object, for example, is a side effect, but not observable. The difference matters because the side effects may be rearranged or removed altogether by the compiler, so long as the observable behaviour remains the same. int main() { int a; a = 30; a += 2; ...


13

The preprocessor is a dumb beast. It works on a purely textual level, without regard for what it's doing to the code semantically. Let's see what it does in this case: a = XXX * 10; becomes a = ABC - XYZ * 10; which becomes a = 20 - 10 * 10; which is, obviously, -80. What was probably intended was #define XXX (ABC - XYZ) This is one reason why ...


12

The each iterator over hashes uses a hidden per hash variable to keep track of where it is in the hash. My guess is that the code used to generate the $cmd_string hash also uses each but is not iterating to completion. To reset the each iterator, place keys %{$cmd_string->{$desc}}; before your while loop. Calling keys in void context is the standard ...


12

The short answer It's fine for macros to have side effects, but you should make sure that your program doesn't change behavior when it's compiled ahead of time. The longer answer Macros with side effects are a powerful tool, and can let you do things that make programs much easier to write, or enable things that wouldn't be possible at all. But there are ...


11

Yes, you want reject: new_hash = original_hash.reject{|key, _| key == :foo}


11

Python simply contains many different ways to remove items from a list. All are useful in different situations. # removes the first index of a list del arr[0] # Removes the first element containing integer 8 from a list arr.remove(8) # removes index 3 and returns the previous value at index 3 arr.pop(3) # removes indexes 2 to 10 del arr[2:10] Thus they ...


11

Native operator expressions are not equivalent to overloaded operator expressions. There is a sequence point at the binding of values to function arguments, which makes the operator++() versions well-defined. But that doesn't exist for the native-type case. In all four cases, i changes twice within the full-expression. Since no ,, ||, or && appear ...


10

I did a lot of VS project manipulation a few years back. Seems like creating the XmlDocument and using Load directly (versus using Get-Content and casting to XML) worked better for me: $path = "C:\temp\foo.csproj" $proj = new-object system.xml.xmldocument $proj.PreserveWhitespace = $true $proj.Load($path) ... $proj.Save($path) Update - Try setting the ...


10

This is not undefined behavior in C++03 because there is a sequence point after all the function arguments are evaluated. The draft standard that is closest to C++03 and that is publicly available is N1804, there is no public version of the draft standard from before that I can find but the Wikipedia article on sequence points used C++98 and c++03 as ...



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