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11

The python signal handlers do not seem to be real signal handlers; that is they happen after the fact, in the normal flow and after the C handler has already returned. Thus you'd try to put your quit logic within the signal handler. As the signal handler runs in the main thread, it will block execution there too. Something like this seems to work nicely. ...


4

SIGINT does not kill the script after the handler runs. Here is a small, self contained test case: trap on_sigint SIGINT on_sigint() { echo "caught"; } { sleep 3; kill -SIGINT $$; } & echo "Waiting for sigint" sleep 5 echo "Still running" The output is: Waiting for sigint caught Still running If your observation was correct, the last line would ...


3

I guess that you want to exit after detecting user interrupt (of course after the clean up act in done). If that is so, you need to say exit after the rm -rf ... line in your function. Unless you do so, trap would catch a signal SIGINT for example, perform the tasks in your user_interrupt function and the script would continue to execute. To answer the ...


2

#!/bin/bash ./yourbinary & pid=$! trap "kill -9 $pid" SIGINT wait


2

Bash invokes non-cygwin (windows) executables through an intermediate bash process (bash shell -> bash -> java). When you type Ctrl-C, the bash process gets a SIGINT and kills the child java process, so the shutdown hooks are not invoked. Windows processes are not aware of signals like SIGINT, SIGTERM or SIGKILL. As described in the -Xrs option ...


2

The key to understanding what is going on is the comment you made No. When the threads are all completed then I do...but not during thread execution for all the files they have to upload. and this line of code: q.join() Contrary to what you are probably expecting, a control-C does NOT cause it to stop waiting for the queue - it doesn't accept the ...


2

The reason you see False printed is because it never gets a chance to print it. You killed it before it every hits your print kill_received[0] statement. Think about it. There is probably a small chance that you could hit Ctrl-C between execution of this statement: while True and not kill_received[0]: and this statement: print kill_received[0] but ...


2

Here's an example of how to do what I think you want to do. #include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> #include <signal.h> #include <ctype.h> typedef void(* sig_func_t )(int); volatile sig_atomic_t keep_looping = 1; void sig_handler(int sig_number) { switch (sig_number) { case SIGINT: keep_looping = 0; break; ...


2

I actually found an elegant solution. I put this in my .bashrc: alias p="trap '' 2; ipython;trap 2;" that way, ctrl-c signal (which code is 2) gets trapped before launching it, and untrapped when exiting ipython.


2

The short story is that sleep() will be interrupted and return when a signal is caught. The return value of sleep will tell you how many seconds it had left before it should have returned were it not interrupted. Certain functions get interrupted and returns when a signal is caught. This varies with your platform, and how a signal handler is installed. (And ...


2

On receiving a signal the call to sleep() is interupted. To visualise this modify the code as follows: unsigned seconds_left = 10; while (0 < (seconds_left = sleep(seconds_left))) { printf("Woke up with still %us to sleep, falling asleep again ...\n", seconds_left } From man sleep (Italics by me): RETURN VALUE Zero if the requested ...


1

I think you used the wrong function. It should be sigsetjmp and siglongjmp when you use signal.Because they can restore signal context. #include <signal.h> #include <stdio.h> #include <setjmp.h> #include <unistd.h> jmp_buf jbuf; void handler(int sig); int main() { sigsetjmp(jbuf,1); signal(SIGINT,handler); while(1){ } ...


1

Make it sleep, so you have a chance to type ctrl-C. Then it works fine: #include <signal.h> #include <stdio.h> #include <setjmp.h> #include <unistd.h> jmp_buf jbuf; void handler(int sig); main() { setjmp(jbuf); signal(SIGINT,handler); sleep(15); } void handler(int sig) { if(sig==SIGINT) { printf("Program ...


1

Solved it. The problem was a bit subtle. After using fork(), child processes apparently inherit their parents signal handlers, even if you use the exec() system calls afterwards. So the child process for sleeper was using the ignore handler. The solution was simply to add the default handler signal(SIGINT, SIG_DFL) between the calls to fork() and exec().


1

As long as the job is running in the foreground, keys will not be passed to the shell. So setting a key binding for killing a foreground process and starting it again won't work. But as you could start your server in an endless loop, so that it restarts automatically. Assuming the name of the command is run_server you can start it like this on the shell: ...


1

int timeEnd = t.tv_sec + t.tv_usec; That won't work because tv_sec and tv_usec are different orders of magnitude. If you want microsecond accuracy, you'll have to store the value in a larger type (e.g. int64_t) and convert the seconds to microseconds. if(check if under 3 seconds) { // How to deal with these two problems? Well, what have you tried? ...


1

Try this: while true do xterm -e wine theprogram || break sleep 3 done The trick is done by using another xterm to start the wine. That way the wine has a different controlling tty and won't be affected by the Ctrl-c press. The drawback is that there will be an additional xterm lingering around on your desktop. You could use the option -iconic to ...


1

if this is a homework, i'd guess the request was to catch the signal and print a message in your signal handler. The default action of SIGINT is terminating a process so i'm guessing 'ignore' means to not exit..., rather than SIG_IGN.


1

It is not a bug - calling execve has replaced the running binary image. The function handler2() (and any other function of your binary) is no longer mapped in the program memory having been replaced by the image of "foo" and therefore all signal settings are replaced to a default. If you wish the signal handler to be active during "foo" run, you have to: ...


1

When the SIGINT is sent to your process, it is delivered to the only thread that has it unblocked, your Ctrl_C_handler thread. Signal delivery means taking whatever action is associated with the signal, and the default action for SIGINT is, as you know, process termination. But why doesn't sigwait() calmly intercept the signal, as you intend? sigwait() is ...


1

However, one of the games can only gracefully stop by pressing the 'ESC' key. How can I interpret this into a signal or something similar? You can't. You're trying to cover for a design error in a child process which I suspect grabs its own input and doesn't use the stdin which would allow you to to send an Esc. Let me know if this assumption is ...


1

What you are doing is specifically prohibited: Shutdown hooks should also finish their work quickly. Joining random threads cannot be described as 'quick'. Obviously those threads should close their own streams when they exit. If they don't exit, how will calling join() accomplish anything?


1

System.exit if successful does not return even via throwing an exception, so the thread will never complete. This wasn't an issue before shutdown hooks. Workaround would be to usual standard locks (or even just hack it with new Thread(new Runnable() { public void run() { System.exit(0); }}).start();).



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