Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

22

Use the /d command line argument with the required program name when executing signtool to sign the msi. It appears that the windows installer creates a temporary copy of the msi file and assigns it a generated name before running it. If you don't use /d with signtool, you get to see the temporary filename which isn't very useful for your users.


15

I just ran into the same issue. Running the build from a Visual Studio 2012 Command Prompt worked, but it was failing in the IDE. Looking for a detailed or diagnostic log led me to What is the default location for MSBuild logs?, which told me that Visual Studio can't give the diagnostic information I really needed. Here's what I finally did to fix it. Open ...


14

On your verify command add in the /pa option to tell it to use the Default Authentication Verification Policy instead of the Windows Driver Verification Policy, meaning it will look at your certificate stores instead of the limited set of CAs Microsoft trusts with drivers. Look here for more options: ...


12

i figured out the problem, the path to the certificate must be relative to the installer output path, not the current working folder. In this case, it would be "..\cert.pfx"


9

Using self-signed certificates for digitally signing your binaries pretty much goes against the concept of using digital certificates with programs. The basic idea is to prove the code was created by you (authenticity) and has not been modified since you released it (integrity). This must be done by using a signed certificate that is signed by a trusted ...


5

Your file is signed. Windows declares the publisher as unknown because it does not trust the publisher identification in the signature. Remember that in the world of digital signatures, you always need to verify at least two things at once or the whole exercise is meaningless. You must check the name on the signature, and you also need to find a trust ...


4

You can find an answer in the latest version of the MSDN signwizard: This command is not supported. Windows Vista and earlier: Launches the signing wizard. Only a single file can be specified for the file name command-line parameter. As I understand, it means that the parameter no more exists in the Windows SDK 7.0.


4

I finally found the answer on an obscure blog. When the MSI is compiled, it does not pull from the bin directory, it pulls from the obj directory. Basically, I had been signing the wrong executable.


4

Turns out that this year we were given a new private key. Well, you're not given a private key, the certificate+key is fetched through the browser and stored in a certificate store. From there we can export a .PFX (A pfx contains a certificate and a private key). With this PFX exported from the browser's certificate store, we can use it directly to sign ...


4

So apparently, you can't just take any temporary key and sign the APPX with it. In particular the certificate subject lines must match(the "publisher name"). I do not know of a better way of determining what the subject line much actually be so bare with me. First, try to use signtool and sign the APPX file with any temporary key. Now go to Event Viewer. ...


4

Because the folder isn't in the system PATH. (From the command prompt, type PATH and hit enter to see what the current PATH contains.) You can add the folder by adding the folder to the existing PATH from the command prompt (of course, replace the folder with the proper location for the SDK version and location on your system): set PATH="C:\Program Files ...


3

I strongly suspect a failing connection to the timestamp server being responsible for occasional failures. Perhaps you check your system event log for lost connections at the time in question.


3

If you want to be a "Known Publisher" you need a certificate from an authority like Verisign, etc. It's not cheap (Verisign charges ~$400/yr). https://www.symantec.com/verisign/code-signing/microsoft-authenticode/buy See also : http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms247066 http://stackoverflow.com/a/1191152/327083 Basically there are two things you ...


3

I had the same issue but only when I'm trying to sign it under IIS/PHP script. When I run PHP from the console it's OK. And here there were no issue with account. Only one thing helped me - changing Anonymous Authentication Credentials for Site/application from Specific USER to Application pool identity.


3

I'm assuming you've scoured the .NET Framework docs and didn't find what you needed. The answer to this StackOverflow question has a link that describes how to use the native Windows CryptQueryObject function to verify a signature. So all that's left is to check out PInvoke.NET to see how to bring that function into .NET.


3

SignCode (for .Net 1.0 and 1.1) uses Authenticode signing, which as far as I'm aware, lacks a .Net Framework managed interface. You will likely need to use P/Invoke to call routines in Win32 API such as those found in this KB article: How To Get Information from Authenticode Signed Executables. Likely you'll need to use CryptQueryObject which will get you ...


3

The developer license just allows you to deploy and run Windows Store apps on Windows RT, while such apps are still being developed. If you are building a Store app, you should not worry about signing your binaries yourself. The Store signs all the contents of your app package before it is distributed to the end-users. Desktop apps is a different story ...


3

I not sure that this could help, but I remember that if you are copying thumbprint from snap-in field, there is an "invisible" symbol in first position. So this thumbprint with that non-printable can't be located in your store. Try to remove 3-5 symbols from beginning of certificate thumbprint (including quotes) and type them manually. Also take in ...


3

I've found an article about signing files using Thawte's certificate: http://codingexpedition.wordpress.com/2011/04/21/thawte-code-signing-pfx/ It seems that /ac signtool option is always required. So, i've extracted Thawte certificates into .cer file and apply it with /ac parameter. openssl pkcs12 -in company.pfx -out company_ca.pem -nokeys -cacerts ...


3

There are a couple of problems. First of all you are using self-signed certificate, so you should define it explicitly by adding -r key to makecert command or you'll get an error "The signer's certificate is not valid for signing" at sign step. Next, at this step signtool.exe sign /f "App-O.pfx" /p fess "C:\Output\setup.exe" you are trying to open pfx ...


2

Try something like that: Assembly.GetEntryAssembly().GetName().GetPublicKey() I used GetEntryAssembly in that case, but of course you can call the method on any loaded assembly.


2

If it's a py2exe issue, maybe give the newer PyInstaller a shot to build your executable. It's in active development, unlike py2exe which apparently hasn't been updated since 2008-11-16.


2

You can find a working C# code here: Determining if a file has a valid digital signature


2

I have managed to crack this nut and signed CAB with test certificate. First I have changed makecert call by adding -r parameter that stands for self-signing: makecert.exe -sv "Demo.pvk" -n "CN=Gregor Primar SP,E=gprimar@gmail.com" "Demo.cer" -r Next step was creating pfx using makecert not pvk2pfx any more: makecert -sk GpSolutionsKey -iv "Demo.pvk" -n ...


2

None of the suggested answers worked for me using Windows 2008 R2 and IIS 7.5. What did work was to change a setting for the application pool. Here is what works on IIS 7.5. Select your application pool and click Advanced Settings Under Process Model, change Identity to LocalSystem This is the only thing that worked for me, hopefully it will help ...


2

A very useful article can be found here. Answers: The expiration date is part of the file. So you'll get a new file. No. When your file is signed and timestamped, the signature will not expire when the certificate expires (explained in the linked article). .snk files are for strong naming assemblies. These are generally signed using self-signed ...


2

I had the same problem. It happens because MS antimalware process MsMpEng.exe check the binary and don't let anyone access it. To solve the problem, I build binary on RAM disk and it worked.


2

If the key holder is ok with the builds being signed automatically rather than with his actual permission, then you could set up some kind of server program on his machine that does the signing, and change the command in Inno to hand the build off to that program over your network rather than calling signtool directly. That way only his machine will know ...


2

For timestamping is a connection to the internet required. How should the remote server verify your signature it without getting any data from you? You cannot download that dll file, it's just a bad url. It's a webservice where you can query for signing your signature.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible