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7

As a short answer, you need to check which BLAS library your R is linked to. If it is linked to reference BLAS, then the answer is certainly no; If it is linked to optimized BLAS, the answer is possibly yes. I used "possibly", because the example operation you give: element wise product, does not map to a BLAS routine. It might be as well just coded as a ...


5

[Based on the first comment and some edits, the resulting solution is a little different. I will present that first, then leave the original thought below] The main idea here is using multiplication by powers of 2 to accomplish the shifting, since these constants can vary across the vector. @harold pointed out the next idea, which is that multiplication ...


4

With OpenMP, Ifort is using SIMD to vectorize the outer loop (over i), so essentially all the time is spent doing ## set up ymm3 with 4 copies of 1.0/(1.0*i), # and j = %edx = 0 ..B1.5: do { incl %edx # j++ vaddpd %ymm3, %ymm2, %ymm2 # ymm3 + ymm2 => ymm2 cmpl $10000000, %edx ...


4

Thanks to @PaulR and @PeterCordes. Unrolling the loop by a factor of 4 works. void apply_mask(vector<uint8_t> &payload, const uint8_t (&masking_key)[4]) { const size_t size = payload.size(); const size_t size4 = size / 4; size_t i = 0; uint8_t *p = &payload[0]; uint32_t *p32 = reinterpret_cast<uint32_t *>(p); const ...


4

If you need to compile with -O0, then do as much as possible in a single statement. In normal code, int a=foo(); bar(a); will compile to the same asm as bar(foo()), but in -O0 code, the second version will probably be faster, because it doesn't store the result to memory and then reload it for the next statement. -O0 is designed to give the most ...


4

There is no restriction on how you feed the GPU with your vertices. You can customize the input layout to read values from any number of vertex buffers, in your example, you will have at least three elements. In the vertex shader, you receive your three elements as three scalars and swizzle them back. The only real limitation is that each value are at the ...


3

You can do it with SSE2's _mm_sad_epu8 (psadbw), e.g.: inline uint32_t _mm_sum_epu8(const __m128i v) { __m128i vsum = _mm_sad_epu8(v, _mm_setzero_si128()); return _mm_extract_epi16(vsum, 0) + _mm_extract_epi16(vsum, 4); }


2

The XOP instruction set does provide _mm_rot_epi8() (which is NOT Microsoft-specific; it is also available in GCC since 4.4 or earlier, and should be available in recent clang, too). It can be used to perform the desired task in 128-bit units. Unfortunately, I don't have a CPU with XOP support, so I cannot test that. On AVX2, splitting the 256-bit register ...


2

You probably want something like this: complex double * complexScalingSSE(complex double *input, double c, int length) { const __m128d vc = _mm_set1_pd(c); for (int i = 0; i < length; i++) { __m128d v = _mm_loadu_pd((double *)&input[i]); // load one complex double v = _mm_mul_pd(v, vc); // scale ...


2

Yes, the returned value is a bitmask: it is set to all zeroes for false, or all ones for true. 32 bits of ones happen to be encoding of NaN when interpreted as a 32-bit float. Bitmasks are useful because you can use them to mask out some results, e.g. (A & M) | (B & ~M) will select the value of A when the mask M was true (all ones) and the value of ...


2

You are initialising Y incorrectly (reverse order) and very inefficiently. Change: Y = _mm_set_epi32(a[i], a[i+1], a[i+2], a[i+3]); to: Y = _mm_load_si128(&a[i]);


2

Looks like this is a known issue, clang has apparently been modified to show a warning in this case: https://github.com/llvm-mirror/clang/commit/024d9c65e9d3887045c82be09e4f630f19da48b4


2

Intel published a paper on SIMD-accelerating SHA512, in Nov 2012. They say they got ~8.59 cycles/byte for their AVX version, on a Sandybridge i7 2600. They didn't publish results for their AVX2 / rorx (BMI2) version, since Haswell wasn't released yet. I didn't follow the links to the source code; presumably it's C with intrinsics. To implement it in ...


2

Consider using OpenMP4.x #pragma omp simd reduction for innermost loop. Take in mind that omp reductions are not applicable to C++ arrays, therefore you have to use temporary reduction variable like shown below. #define IDX(a, b) ((a * npages) + b) // 2D matrix indexing for (size_t i = 0; i < npages; i++) { my_type tmp_reduction = 0.0; // was: // ...


2

First, EOF is right, you should see how well gcc/clang/icc do at auto-vectorizing your scalar code. I can't check for you, because you only posted code-fragments, not anything I can throw on http://gcc.godbolt.org/. You definitely don't need to malloc anything. Notice that your intrinsics version only ever uses 32B at a time of res[], and always ...


1

Use SSE4.1 pmovsxbd or pmovzxbd to sign or zero extend a block of 4 bytes to a 16B vector of 32bit integer elements. Note that using pmovzxbd (_mm_epi8_epi32) as a load seems to be impossible to write both safely and efficiently, because there isn't an intrinsic with a narrower memory operand. To do the comparison part, use pcmpeqd to generate a mask of ...


1

Some compilers are pretty good about doing optimization of vectors. Did you check the generated assembly of optimized build of both versions? Isn't the "naive" version actually using SIMD or other optimization techniques?


1

Well, there is little-known R distribution from Microsoft (artist, formerly known as Revolution R), which could be found here It comes with Intel MKL library, which utilizes multiple threads and vector operations as well (you have to run Intel CPU though), and it really helps with matrices, things like SVD, etc Unless you're willing to write C/C++ code ...


1

The problem comes just from the fact that a Vector4 contains 4 longs and DirectX Vector4 contains 4 Floats. In each case passing vectors only to add Xs makes the code much more complex because W, Y and Z have to be copied even if unchanged. The vectors are copied during each "new SomeWrapper(v)" and outside the function a last time to affect the result to ...


1

I solved it: public struct Vector4D { public double X, Y, Z, W; private unsafe Vector<double> vectorXY { get { fixed (Vector4D* ptr = &this) { return SharpDX.Utilities.Read<Vector<double>>((IntPtr)ptr); } } set { fixed ...


1

Depending on the target architecture I was able to get the compiler to vectorize with a directive. !CDIR$ IVDEP do ii = 1, N if (diff(ii) .le. M ) then i = i0 + ii - 1 rbuf( irb ) = i irb = irb + 1 end if end do and -xMIC-AVX512 or -mmic will give vector instructions for those architectures. e.g. vpcompressd %zmm0, ...


1

The main argument to use a typedef with __attribute__ ((__vector_size__... is, that it produces easier sourcecode. The main argument to prefer immintrin.h is, that it is less compiler-specific. You can find out more about the limitations of each by web-searching for the combination of immintrin and gcc vector extension. In any case, the rest of your ...



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