Hot answers tagged

17

Here's one way to implement something similar to what you ask about. Nat First note that you define Nat as a class and then use it as a type. I think it makes sense to have it as a type, so let's define it as such. data Z data S n data Nat n where Zero :: Nat Z Succ :: Nat n -> Nat (S n) LessThan We can also define LessThan as a type. data ...


16

As you describe, singleton types are those which have only one value (let's ignore ⊥ for the moment). Thus, the value of a singleton type has a unique type representing the value. The crux of dependent-type theory (DTT) is that types can depend on values (or, said another way, values can parameterise types). A type theory that allows types to depend on ...


13

This works as written as of the most recent shapeless 2.1.0-SNAPSHOT.


11

Nullary constructors are allocated only once. All their uses are then shared (in GHC; this behaviour is not dictated by the Haskell standard). The () is a nullary constructor of the unit type (). So using () all over the place hardly costs any memory. If you instantiate a type parameter to (), you will still pay for the presence of that parameter, though. ...


7

Singleton types can only refer to AnyRef descendants. See Why do String literals conform to Scala Singleton for more details. The argument the application id(BigInt(9)) can't be referred to via a stable path, so consequently doesn't have an interesting singleton type. scala> id(new {}) res4: AnyRef = $anon$1@7440d1b0 scala> var o = new {}; id(o) o: ...


6

I think this is a sound approach, it's just that .. sometimes you need to help the type system out a bit. Firstly, the way you write the All predicate matters a lot (if it reduces at the proper times) and I don't know which All you are using. Also, you are using symbolVal on the name but there is no proof that it is a KnownSymbol - you must add this proof ...


4

I'll try to present here an "idiomatic" singletons solution (if such a thing even exists). Preliminaries: {-# LANGUAGE RankNTypes, DataKinds, PolyKinds, ConstraintKinds, GADTs, TypeOperators, MultiParamTypeClasses, TypeFamilies, ScopedTypeVariables #-} import Data.Singletons.Prelude import Data.Proxy import GHC.Exts (Constraint) -- SingI constraint ...


4

The keys will all be (represented as) pointers pointing to a single allocated () constructor.


2

If you think of a type as a set of values, the singleton type of a value x is the type which only contains this value ({x}). Usage examples: Pattern matching: case _: Foo.type checks that the matched object is the same as foo using eq, where case Foo only checks that it's equal to Foo using equals. It's needed to write down the type of an object (as a type ...


2

I post another answer as it is more direct, editing the previous won't make sense. In fact using the trick (popularised if not invented by Edward Kmett), from reflections reifyNat: {-# LANGUAGE GADTs #-} {-# LANGUAGE DataKinds #-} {-# LANGUAGE KindSignatures #-} {-# LANGUAGE TypeOperators #-} {-# LANGUAGE ScopedTypeVariables #-} {-# LANGUAGE ...


2

I believe the problem is that there are two natural number singleton types both called SNat. The one you seem to have found goes with GHC typelits. Its constructor is not exported from the defining module, but it's an Integer underneath. You can access that integer, but the whole thing seems to be pretty much useless for proofs. The other SNat version deals ...


2

The following program prints false and then true. To my mind, there should be no material difference between these two cases (though that's really more of an opinion; I can't really say if there's a reason or not): import scala.reflect.runtime.universe._ object Test2 extends App { def foo(): Type = { object a typeOf[a.type] } println(foo() ...


2

This is a known quirk of scalac. Singleton types are a compiler internal and they've been there for a long time, but they've never been meant to be exposed to the users. So, there's no guarantee about their "API" and as a matter of fact scalac tries to make them "disappear" whenever it can. This is pretty much the reason why Miles had to use a Witness type ...


2

I feel like I should be able to just use singI here and let the type family do both of the work. This can't be done. The reason why we have the many TH facilities in singletons is that data and function definitions must be duplicated in the current state of affairs. The idiomatic usage would be defining everything on the term level once, and ...


1

You can construct structural types inline: scala> val a = new {def hello = null} -> 1 // by the way hello is accessible in a (but scala uses reflection for that) a: (AnyRef{def hello: Null}, Int) = ($anon$1@68e2da47,1) scala> var b = new {def hello = null} -> 2 b: (AnyRef{def hello: Null}, Int) = ($anon$1@77147ad6,2) scala> b = a b: ...


1

So, three months later, I have been going back and forth on good ways to accomplish this, but I finally settled on an actual very succinct trick that doesn't require any throwaway newtypes; it involves using a Dict from the constraints library; you could easily write a: natDict :: KnownNat n => Proxy n -> Dict (KnownNat n) natDict _ = Dict triple :: ...


1

Looks like in class definition for scala it's not enough information for types inference. What about defining Kniption parametrized: case class Kniption[T](a: T)(implicit ev: Applicable[T])


1

At least, this gonna solve your problem with passing this: object Demo { trait C[+A] trait Item extends SourceOf { type T = C[this.type] } trait SourceOf { type T <: C[Item] } } Example (you'll have to compare Ts instead of SourceOfs here): scala> val i = new Item{} i: Demo.Item = $anon$1@c70cb4c scala> implicitly[i.T =:= ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible