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20

So, first problem is corner order. They must be in the same order in both vectors. So, if in the first vector your order is:(top-left, bottom-left, bottom-right, top-right) , they MUST be in the same order in the other vector. Second, to have the resulting image contain only the object of interest, you must set its width and height to be the same as ...


17

There is a Johnson distribution in the SuppDists package. Johnson will give you a distribution that matches either moments or quantiles. Others comments are correct that 4 moments does not a distribution make. But Johnson will certainly try. Here's an example of fitting a Johnson to some sample data: require(SuppDists) ## make a weird dist with Kurtosis ...


14

All you need to do is to think in 3d: div { width: 300px; height:80px; margin-left:40px; background-image: url('http://rtjansen.nl/images/stackoverflow.png'); -webkit-transform: perspective(100px) rotateX(-25deg); -webkit-transform-origin: left center; -moz-transform: perspective(100px) rotateX(-25deg); ...


13

The problem was the order in which the points were declared inside the vector, and then there was also another issue related to this on the definition of dst_vertices. The order of the points matter to getPerspectiveTransform() and must be specified in the following order: 1st-------2nd | | | | | | 3rd-------4th Therefore, the ...


13

#red .box { background-color: red; transform: perspective( 600px ) rotateY( 45deg ); } then html <div class="box red"></div> from http://desandro.github.com/3dtransforms/docs/perspective.html


13

Skew the box one way, and its contents the other: <aside class="skew-neg"> <div class="skew-pos"> <p>Hello World.</p> <p>@jonathansampson.</p> <p>This box is skewed.</p> <p>In supported browsers.</p> </div> </aside> /* Skew the container one way ...


13

As denoted in a comment by stijn the message "Clock skew detected" is most commonly given if compiling sources located on an NFS mount and the NFS server's clock runs ahead the client's clock doing the compilation.


11

Yes, it's skewed, unless your RAND_MAX happens to be a multiple of 10. If you take the numbers from 0 to RAND_MAX, and try to divide them into 10 piles, you really have only three possibilities: RAND_MAX is a multiple of 10, and the piles come out even. RAND_MAX is not a multiple of 10, and the piles come out uneven. You split it into uneven groups to ...


11

I think you mean webkit transform.. please check this URL out http://www.the-art-of-web.com/css/3d-transforms/ it could help you.


10

CSS: #box { width: 200px; height: 200px; background: black; position: relative; -webkit-transition: all 300ms ease-in; } #box:hover { -webkit-transform: rotate(-180deg) scale(0.8); } #box:after, #box:before { display: block; content: "\0020"; color: transparent; width: 211px; height: 45px; background: white; ...


9

I spent a lot of time working on this today (ran into the same problem) and came up with the code below. Key thing to note, you need to set preTranslate() and postTranslate() to the center (or somewhere else) of your Canvas area. It seems to mean that it uses the center of the image to apply the transformation from, instead of the upper left corner ...


8

I had this thing that it could be done with just one element - and it can be done, I just don't think it's exactly the best solution to do it like this. DEMO HTML: <div class='speech-bubble'>Hello!</div> CSS: .speech-bubble { position: relative; margin: .5em auto; padding: 1em; width: 10em; height: 4em; border-radius: .25em; ...


7

Some time ago I found a blog that had 2 interesting posts on this subject: Detect skew angle Rotation (Deskew) These posts also share the source code.


7

This is an interesting question, which doesn't really have a good solution. I presume that even though you don't know the other moments, you have an idea of what the distribution should look like. For example, it's unimodal. There a few different ways of tackling this problem: Assume an underlying distribution and match moments. There are many standard R ...


6

This should work for the most part for skewing an object with a transformation matrix, in particular using glMultMatrix(matrix) matrix1[] = { 1, 0, 0, 0, tan(a), 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1 }; matrix2[] = { 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, tan(a), 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1 }; matrix3[] = { 1, tan(a), 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, ...


6

Need to tweak the positioning and the size of the container so you can crop it, and apply the backface-visibility rule: .skew { -webkit-backface-visibility : hidden; /* the magic ingredient */ -webkit-transform : skew(16deg, 0); overflow : hidden; width : 300px; height ...


5

You cannot achieve the effect you want with skew(). However, you can use a Camera object and 3D rotations to achieve this effect. The Camera will generate a Matrix for you that you can then apply on the Canvas. Note that the result will not be perspective correct, but good enough for your purpose. This how 3D rotations are done in Honeycomb's Launcher for ...


5

You can use -webkit-perspective and -webkit-transform together. <div style="-webkit-perspective:300;"> <div style="-webkit-transform:rotate3d(0, 1, 0, 30deg);width:200px;height:200px;background:#D73913;"></div> </div> This works only in Safari.


5

I was able to make something very similar.. it works in all modern browsers. Full Screen Demo ---- jsFiddle demo HTML - Pretty simple <div> <p>text..</p> </div> <div> <p>text..</p> </div> <div> <p>text..</p> </div> CSS div:nth-child(1) { background: rgb(122, ...


4

The correct matrix of skewing in only one direction is context.setTransform(1, Math.tan(angle), 0, 1, 0, 0); // ^ With the number at ^ being 1, you are skewing the image in the y-direction by 45° as well. Sample: http://jsbin.com/etecay/edit#html,live


4

For anyone who's interested, here's my temporary solution: live demo. I used this sprite image: html: <div class="container"> <h2 class="sub-heading"><span class="sub-heading-txt">Short title</span></h2> </div> <div class="container"> <h2 class="sub-heading"><span class="sub-heading-txt">A bit longer ...


4

When working with a quadrangle, OpenCV isn't really your friend. RotatedRect will give you incorrect results. Also you will need a perspective projection instead of a affine projection like others mentioned here.. Basicly what must been done is: Loop through all polygon segments and connect those which are almost equel. Sort them so you have the 4 most ...


4

You'll have to fiddle with rotating along all 3 axes, and skewing. Here's an example: div { perspective: 200px; width: 150px; position: relative; color: white; line-height: 2.4; text-align: center; padding-left: 20px; } div::before { content: ''; z-index: -1; position: absolute; background: #7fc552; top: 0; ...


3

You can use Reflector on the SkewTransform class to find out the math. It calls Matrix.Skew, which uses the matrix: 1.0 tan(skewY) 0.0 tax(skewX) 1.0 0.0 Since you want tan(skewY) * 0.766 = 0.321, you get skewY = atan(0.321 / 0.766) = 22.7366108 degrees. Or, going back to your original numbers, skewY = atan(sin(y) * sin(x) / ...


3

I got the same kind of issue and fixed it using OpenCV's homography extraction function. You can see how I did in this question: Transforming a rectangle image into a quadrilateral using a CATransform3D


3

With the combination of CSS shapes, positioning, :before and :after selectors I've managed to make the container expandable to any content. However, this approach only works in modern browsers and it seems that there's no proper solution without js. Also, the use of svg could be really handful in this case but again you're limited to the browser ...


3

It's really easy, you just need to unskew the thing for the children. Unskew means applying another skew transform, but of opposite angle this time. .parent { transform: skewX(45deg); } .parent > * { transform: skew(-45deg); } In general, if you apply a number of transforms on a parent element and you want the child elements to go back to normal, then ...


3

In your example transform, the b & c would respectively represent the horizontal and vertical skew. The transform matrix is arranged like this: context.setTransform(scaleX, skewX, skewY, scaleY, translateX, translateY); The amount of skew is a tangent angle that's expressed in radians. So this will skew 30 degrees horizontally: var ...


2

Use the rsn function from the sn package in R (as I think from another question that R will work for you also): rsn(n=100, location=1.256269, scale=1.605681, shape=5) Will generate 100 (n) random numbers from a skew-normal distribution with the required location, scale and shape. Use higher sample size for plotting, e.g.: hist(rsn(n=10000, ...


2

border detection hough transform (if all rectangles on an image have the same skew) rectangle contour detection (connected component contour, then minimum area bounding rectangle)



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