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19

Generally speaking a sliding window is a sub-list that runs over an underlying collection. I.e., if you have an array like [a b c d e f g h] a sliding window of size 3 would run over it like [a b c] [b c d] [c d e] [d e f] [e f g] [f g h] This is useful if you for instance want to compute a running average, or if you want ...


10

I wrote an extension to do most of what you're after - BufferWithInactivity. Here it is: public static IObservable<IEnumerable<T>> BufferWithInactivity<T>( this IObservable<T> source, TimeSpan inactivity, int maximumBufferSize) { return Observable.Create<IEnumerable<T>>(o => { var gate = ...


10

Use a deque. http://docs.python.org/2/library/collections.html#collections.deque >>> import collections >>> d = collections.deque(maxlen=7) >>> d.extend([12,2,4,67,8,9,23]) >>> d.append(45) >>> print d deque([2, 4, 67, 8, 9, 23, 45], maxlen=7)


9

The short answer: %# nx = length(x) %# nwind = window_size idx = bsxfun(@plus, (1:nwind)', 1+(0:(fix(nx/nwind)-1))*nwind)-1; idx will be a matrix of size nwind-by-K where K is the number of sliding windows (ie each column contains the indices of one sliding window). Note that in the code above, if the last window's length is less than the desired one, it ...


9

This is possible by combining the built-in Window and Throttle methods of Observable. First, let's solve the simpler problem where we ignore the maximum count condition: public static IObservable<IList<T>> BufferUntilInactive<T>(this IObservable<T> stream, TimeSpan delay) { var closes = stream.Throttle(delay); return ...


9

This is my favorite MySQL hack. This is how you emulate the lag function: SET @quot=-1; select time,company,@quot lag_quote, @quot:=quote curr_quote from stocks order by company,time; lag_quote holds the value of previous row's quote. For the first row @quot is -1. curr_quote holds the value of current row's quote. Notes: order by clause is ...


8

Your approach is correct, but as you note, it is way too slow for the task at hand. Consider how large your task is in the numerically best implementation (not bothering about boundary values): def kurt(X, w): n, m = X.shape K = np.zeros_like(X) for i in xrange(w, n-w): # 5000 iterations for j in xrange(w, m-w): ...


7

You can use LAG and LEAD to access the previous and next rows. SELECT *, LAG([Percentage]) OVER (PARTITION BY [IP_Country] ORDER BY [ds]) - [Percentage] AS diff, ([Percentage] - LEAD([Percentage]) OVER (PARTITION BY [IP_Country] ORDER BY [ds])) ...


7

Here is a solution that returns what you want in MySQL SET @a :=0; SET @b :=2; SELECT r.id, r.value, r.value/r2.value AS 'lag' FROM (SELECT if(@a, @a:=@a+1, @a:=1) as rownum, id, value FROM results) AS r LEFT JOIN (SELECT if(@b, @b:=@b+1, @b:=1) as rownum, id, value FROM results) AS r2 ON r.rownum = r2.rownum MySQL 5.1 doesn't like a self join against a ...


6

Data generation: N <- 1e5 # rows M <- 200 # columns W <- 10 # window size set.seed(1) intensities <- matrix(rnorm(N*M), nrow=N, ncol=M) coords <- 8000000 + sort(sample(1:(5*N), N)) Original function with minor modifications I used for benchmarks: doSlidingWindow <- function(intensities, coords, windsize) { windHalfSize <- ...


6

SELECT *, ( SELECT SUM(value) FROM mytable mi WHERE mi.tstamp BETWEEN m.tstamp - '2.5 minute'::INTERVAL AND m.tstamp + '2.5 minute'::INTERVAL ) AS maxvalue FROM mytable m ORDER BY maxvalue DESC LIMIT 1


6

What you could do is add a processing step to find the locally strongest response from SVM. Let me explain. What you appear to be doing right now: for each sliding window W, record category[W] = SVM.hardDecision(W) Hard decision means it return a boolean or integer, and for 2-category classification could be written like this: hardDecision(W) = bool( ...


6

Adapted from @Jaime's answer here: http://stackoverflow.com/a/14314054/553404 import numpy as np def rolling_sum(a, n=4) : ret = np.cumsum(a, axis=1, dtype=float) ret[:, n:] = ret[:, n:] - ret[:, :-n] return ret[:, n - 1:] M = np.array([[0., 0., 0., 0., 0., 1., 1., 0., 1., 1., 1., 0., 0.], [0., 0., 1., 0., 1., ...


5

How about this: SELECT changes + changes1 + changes2 + changes3 changes28days, login, USEC_TO_TIMESTAMP(week) FROM ( SELECT changes, LAG(changes, 1) OVER (PARTITION BY login ORDER BY week) changes1, LAG(changes, 2) OVER (PARTITION BY login ORDER BY week) changes2, LAG(changes, 3) OVER (PARTITION BY login ORDER BY week) changes3, ...


5

Here is an attempt with Rcpp. The function assumes that data is sorted according to time. More testing would be advisable and adjustments could be made. #include <Rcpp.h> using namespace Rcpp; // [[Rcpp::export]] NumericVector rollAverage(const NumericVector & times, NumericVector & vals, ...


5

The BigQuery documentation doesn't do a good job of explaining the complexity of window functions that the tool supports because it doesn't specify what expressions can appear after ROWS or RANGE. It actually supports the SQL 2003 standard for window functions, which you can find documented other places on the web, such as here. That means you can get the ...


5

A quick search shows that you do change your stepSize on line 110: stepStart = int(L[1]) stepStop = int(L[2]) stepSize = int(stepStop-(stepStart-1)) stepStop and stepStart appear to depend on your files' contents, so we can't debug it further.


5

Here is one very simple and fast way to do it: >> min([A(1:(end-2)); A(2:(end-1)); A(3:end)], [], 1) ans = 2 2 2 3 3 3 5 8 EDIT: Since you want a full function... function running_min = running_min(x, k) xrep = repmat(x, 1, k); xrep = reshape([xrep zeros(1, k)], length(x)+1, k); running_min = min(xrep, [], 2)'; ...


4

Trying to design a "generalised" implementation which could accommodate just about any operation you might want is going to be an enormous trade off in an architecture like CUDA. For your concrete dot product example, which is a typical reduction operation, this is a pretty useful implementation: __constant__ int ldaX[3]; __constant__ int ldaY[3]; ...


4

create table aa (id number(5), stat number(2), username varchar2(20), d date); insert into aa select 1, 1, 'USER1', to_date('18.08.2010 13:10:14', 'DD.MM.YYYY HH24:MI:SS') from dual union all select 2, 2, 'USER1', to_date('18.08.2010 15:15:40', 'DD.MM.YYYY HH24:MI:SS') from dual union all select 3, 1, 'USER1', to_date('18.08.2010 ...


4

Sounds like you're not looking to spend a lot of time delving into audio processing/engineering, and hence you want something you can quickly understand and just works. If you're willing to go with something more complex see here for a very good reference. That being the case, I'd expect simple loudness and zero crossing measures would be sufficient to ...


4

The post you mentioned gave a general solution for building sliding windows (you could control: overlapping vs. distinct, slide step, overlap amount, windows size) In your case, it is much simpler and can be easily performed with the HANKEL function: x = [13 14 2 14 10 3 5 9 15 8]; idx = hankel(1:3, 3:length(x)) min( x(idx) ) If you want to build a ...


4

If you want a sliding window of n words, use a double-ended queue with maximum length n to implement a buffer. This should illustrate the concept: mystr = "StackOverflow" from collections import deque window = deque(maxlen=5) for char in mystr: window.append(char) print (''.join([c for c in window]) ) Output: S St Sta Stac Stack tackO ...


4

data.table doesn't have any special features for rolling windows, currently. Further detail here in my answer to another similar question here : Is there a fast way to run a rolling regression inside data.table? Rolling median is interesting. It would need a specialized function to do efficiently (same link as in earlier comment) : Rolling median ...


4

You can use Seq from Data.Sequence, which has O(1) enqueue and dequeue at both ends: import Data.Foldable (toList) import qualified Data.Sequence as Seq import Data.Sequence ((|>)) windows :: Int -> [a] -> [[a]] windows n0 = go 0 Seq.empty where go n s (a:as) | n' < n0 = go n' s' as | n' == n0 = toList ...


4

Say A is the longer vector and B the shorter one. You can use hankel function to create a matrix where each row is a window of length 3 over A >> hankel(A(1:3),A(3:end)) ans = 4 5 7 5 7 8 7 8 9 Now you just need to call bsxfun to do the desired action on each row: L=numel(B); bsxfun(@plus, B, ...


4

Try this query: SELECT d1.date date1, d2.date date2, d1.pair, d1.open open1, d1.high high1, d1.low low1, d1.close close2, d2.open open2, d2.high high2, d2.low low2, d2.close close2 FROM table1 d1 JOIN table1 d2 ON d1.pair = d2.pair AND d1.date = d2.date - interval 1 day Demo: ...


4

"Why does the sending entity in TCP need to consider the size of the congestion window when determining the sliding window size? " This is because the size of the congestion window represents the possible congestion in the network. This is one of the key features offered by TCP. This window is updated in three stages. In the first stage, when TCP ...


4

Always use strict and use warnings at the start of your program, especially when you are asking for help with it. It will save a lot of time by finding many simple mistakes for you. From where did you get the idea to use typeglobs in this way? *ARGV is always true so it is useless for testing whether @ARGV is empty, and using *first as a filehandle will ...


3

#include <iostream> #include <thread> #include <chrono> #include <mutex> #include <condition_variable> using namespace std; condition_variable cv; int value; void read_value() { cin >> value; cv.notify_one(); } ...



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